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Thread: Waking up suddenly

  1. #1 Waking up suddenly 
    Forum Masters Degree Golkarian's Avatar
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    I've noticed that if I wake up suddenly, usually while dreaming, I feel much more tired than usual. Even if I wake up at the same time as usual. Is this because my brain hasn't registered that I've slept?


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  3. #2  
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    No, you probably woke up suddenly bescause you werent sleeping deeply or were alpha skimming. You were then tired because the quality of your sleep was so poor/light.


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    Forum Freshman BitterSweet's Avatar
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    this happens a lot to me. but it's usually because i wasn't in a deep sleep and i didn't get enough rest. i'm usually tired everyday, so it's not so good....
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  5. #4  
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    yes.. i think much better to ask the help of some health expert so it will give you a good advice regarding on your case.
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  6. #5  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    On the other hand, I am almost impossible to wake up, yet I never sleep well. I don't think it's a black-and-white issue.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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    is sleep more relaxing or better for you if you actually "Dream' because most nights i just sleep like head hits the pillow out like a light and then i wake up.... NO "Dreaming" : is it better if you dream?? because im always tired.... that + year 12 work
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  8. #7  
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    Dreaming generally takes place during REM sleep which is needed for a good nights sleep, so yes.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman34
    is sleep more relaxing or better for you if you actually "Dream' because most nights i just sleep like head hits the pillow out like a light and then i wake up.... NO "Dreaming" : is it better if you dream?? because im always tired.... that + year 12 work
    Barring brain abnormality and abrievated sleep times, sleep doesn't occur without dreaming. Although you may not recall having dreamed upon waking, more than likely you do experience dreams whenever you enter extended periods of sleep. The sleeping brain is predisposed to dreaming as a consequence of the vestigial metabolic processes of the brainstem amid atonic sleep. Your lack of dream recall is probably associated with your prefrontal function during the arousal process. Regarding your fatique after normal sleep, you may be experiencing poor quality sleep that involves brief rather than extended periods of dreaming.

    Dreaming signals the uptake of energy by the brain amid its period of dormancy. If you are not experiencing normal periods of dreaming amid sleep, this may suggest that your sleeping brain is experiencing an energy debt that manifests as fatique when you awake. Also, there is evidence that dream sleep enhances the production of Orexin-A, which has been shown to be effective in eliminating the symptoms of sleep debt when administered to test animals in sleep deprivation studies.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrmDoc
    Quote Originally Posted by Spaceman34
    is sleep more relaxing or better for you if you actually "Dream' because most nights i just sleep like head hits the pillow out like a light and then i wake up.... NO "Dreaming" : is it better if you dream?? because im always tired.... that + year 12 work
    Barring brain abnormality and abrievated sleep times, sleep doesn't occur without dreaming. Although you may not recall having dreamed upon waking, more than likely you do experience dreams whenever you enter extended periods of sleep. The sleeping brain is predisposed to dreaming as a consequence of the vestigial metabolic processes of the brainstem amid atonic sleep. Your lack of dream recall is probably associated with your prefrontal function during the arousal process. Regarding your fatique after normal sleep, you may be experiencing poor quality sleep that involves brief rather than extended periods of dreaming.

    Dreaming signals the uptake of energy by the brain amid its period of dormancy. If you are not experiencing normal periods of dreaming amid sleep, this may suggest that your sleeping brain is experiencing an energy debt that manifests as fatique when you awake. Also, there is evidence that dream sleep enhances the production of Orexin-A, which has been shown to be effective in eliminating the symptoms of sleep debt when administered to test animals in sleep deprivation studies.
    and now in english please.... lol
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous Editor
    Hold on, vestigial metabolic processes of the brainstem? Have you any evidence or papers on this?
    You dont remember the majority of your dreams so lacking dreams is a difficult call to make!

    Regarding uptake of energy by the brain, I think yo should specify/clarify what you mean. This is not the function of sleep in terms of sugar uptake or energy requirement uptake.
    I will not repond to anonymous editors of my comments. If you are a moderator, please identify yourself! Further, if my comments will be edited without my expressed permission, consider this my final post.
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  12. #11  
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    I am a moderator and I wrote that, but I thought it was as a separate comment, I see now that its not there so my bad! Sorry!
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  13. #12  
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    Appropriately, I deleted your comments from my post and place them here for follow-up

    Quote Originally Posted by Robbie
    Hold on, vestigial metabolic processes of the brainstem? Have you any evidence or papers on this?
    You dont remember the majority of your dreams so lacking dreams is a difficult call to make!

    Regarding uptake of energy by the brain, I think yo should specify/clarify what you mean. This is not the function of sleep in terms of sugar uptake or energy requirement uptake.
    Regarding "vestigial metabolic processes of the brainstem", I arrived at this conclusion based on my investigation of the dreaming brain and its evolution for a book I wrote a few years ago. Sleep is mediated by the brainstem and the evidence suggests that sleep evolved as a means to mediate the energy expenditure of resting animals ancestral to humans. Between extended periods of feeding, ancient animals evolved a means to divert energy stores to biological systems more vital to survival. That diverted energy occurs through what we now experience as muscle atonia at the onset of dream sleep. Atonia is the stage of muscle inelasticity that is opposite of the ready-state of muscle tone we experience while awake and during non-REM sleep. The energy used to sustain muscle readiness is freed for use by other bodily systems at the onset of REM or dream sleep. This is the only time during our lifetime that such a release of muscle tone naturally occurs in the body.

    At the onset of sleep atonia, energy usage by the heart, lungs, and brain increase exponentially. This increased usage of energy is the evolved or vestigial nature of sleep amid an extended period of food privation and diminished physical activity. This surge of energy usage by the brainstem amid sleep activates or stimulate those cognitive regions of the cortex associated with dreaming. The sleep process evolved in the brainstem before the cortical structures associated with dreaming evolved. Further still, decortical study (e.g., Jouvet, M. and Jouvet D., "A study of the Neurophysiological Mechanisms of Dreaming." Electroenceph Clin Neurophysiol. (1963): Supplement 24.) suggests the dependency of cortical activation and function on its afferent connections to subcortical structure. Therefore, dreaming is the outcome of a vestigial metabolic process of the brainstem.

    Regarding dream recall, a lack of remembering whether one has dreamed is not sufficient evidence that the experience never occurred. My position is that dreaming always occur, whether or not we are able to recall the experience upon waking.

    Regarding energy uptake amid sleep, non-REM sleep produces diminished brain function and, therefore, diminished uptake of oxygen and blood nutrients amid the early stages of sleep. REM or dream sleep reverses this trend of diminished uptake. As an organ vital to survival, my position is that the brain evolved to dream from the vestigial process associated with sustaining the vital systems of antecedent animals amid extended periods of food privation and rest. I welcome your thoughts.
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  14. #13  
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    My dreams were alot more interesting when I was alot younger and 'magic' still existed. Now they are boring and everyday mudane scenarios, which leaves me to forgot them entirely unless I'm woken in the night for some reason.
    When I do remember them, I am quite saddened by the unbelievably boring nature of them. Perhaps that's why I wake up tired; I can't be bored to sleep since I'm already there.


    Bittersweet, you will probably get alot better of a night's rest if you have a big 'O' just before sleeping. Worx for my chick, and sure as hell worx for me....
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    That's because of your tired everyday so i think you need to get expert to advice of this problem.
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  16. #15  
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    To the OP. Some posters have suggested you had an overall poor sleep, i.e. the entire night. Additionally I suggest that tiredness may be caused by interrupting the deeper part of any one sleep cycle, of which you have several in a single night. For example you might feel better rested after 7 or 9 hours sleep than 8 hours, just because of how your own peaks and troughs work out. Similarly you may have noticed daytime feelings of sleepiness come in waves.
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  17. #16  
    Forum Senior Booms's Avatar
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    It's purely to do with the state of your brain functions upon waking
    if you wake and are still tired even after getting enough hours sleep it's usually because your brain is still largely unactive and partially unconsiouce,
    it's also why 'waking yourself up' with a brisk walk/cold shower etc involves a shock of forms, it's forcing your brain to 'reactivate' faster than if you poodled round the house for an hour



    some good evidence waking states and the tired sensation are unrelated
    I wake most mornings by jolting upright in bed (I actually wake sitting up where I've sat up as I wake) and always feel fully rested

    Izaak Newton (I think, some famous scientist at any rate) took 'power naps' by holding two spoons over trays either side of his chair, when he fell asleep the spoons dropped and clattered waking him up, this actually served to improve his thinking during the rest of the day and kept him feeling well rested (in truth he was tricking his mind into thinking it had slept and suffered quite badly from sleep deprevation eventually)
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