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Thread: Herniated Disc c 4-5-6

  1. #1 Herniated Disc c 4-5-6 
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    Hi Folks,

    I am new at this forum, but i have been diagnosed with herniated disc c 4-5-6. This was determined by and MRI and scat scan. The scan was taken after the MRI as they though they saw a tumor on the MRI...

    Now, i am 38 male was in good shape before all this, i was the type of guy to crack my neck alot...now i think that i shouldn't done it so much. I do not have back pain, but my problem is i can not turn my neck. I have loss about 60% of movement in my neck...when i turn left or right it is very sore and painful. Of course, sleeping as been affected because since i can not turn my head, sleeping on my back does not exist any more and many other activities. This issue as been with me now for just under 4 years.

    I have had previous injuries in the past but nothing serious. Now, the doctor that requested the MRI and the scan works with a chiroprator because her way of "fixing" me would be through this decompression process...

    Sure i have seen there brochures and commercials but its all nice and dandy...but i need the real truth. Does any one know if this decompression actually does work and is it perminit. See, the doctor, of course, told me that a regular chiroprator can straight you out, it will feel better but you will be back over and over and over. But, this decompression is a perminit fix.

    Thank you in advance for all your help.


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  3. #2  
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    There are now a variety of surgical approaches to treat disc herniation. Each type of operation is customized to the individual situation and depends a great deal on the condition of the spine around the disc affected. Surgical options include microdiscectomy using small surgical instruments and open surgical repair (either from a posterior or anterior approach). Urgent operation can be necessary when cauda equine syndrome is present.


    herniated disc treatment


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  4. #3  
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    I recently had a pinched nerve, C-6, diagnosed by a neurologist and confirmed by an MRI. It probably has existed for years (stiff neck) but was exacerbated by a rafting trip last fall resulting in severe pain in my left arm. I initially saw the doc because I thought I might be having a stroke but luckily it wasn't that. My neurologist prescribed an anti inflammatory and a muscle relaxant which I took for a few weeks. But what actually fixed me up was a series of visits to a physical therapist located in a hospital complex - NOT a chiropractor - my neurologist warned me in no uncertain terms not to go to a chiropractor. He also said surgical solutions were absolutely not necessary.

    The therapy included mild traction, some manipulation of the back, neck and shoulder, and muscle strengthening exercises for the smaller muscles in the neck. (There was also some ultrasound which I believe was useless.) The result is I am now pain free, but still get a slight tingling on occasions. I'd say the therapy was 90% successful and with continuation of the exercises at home I expect it to be 100%.

    Bottom line is proper physical therapy helped me a lot, and I was very skeptical to begin with.
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  5. #4  
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    Arm pain from a cervical herniated disc is one of the more common cervical spine conditions treated by spine specialists. It usually develops in the 30 - 50 year old age group. Although a cervical herniated disc may originate from some sort of trauma or injury to the cervical spine, the symptoms, including arm pain, commonly start spontaneously.

    The arm pain from a cervical herniated disc results because the herniated disc material “pinches” or presses on a cervical nerve, causing pain to radiate along the nerve pathway down the arm. Along with the arm pain, numbness and tingling can be present down the arm and into the fingertips. Muscle weakness may also be present due to a cervical herniated disc.

    spinal stenosis
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  6. #5  
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    Herniated Disc Pain Relief and Treatments Guide.


    Herniated discs are a major cause of disability in people under 45.
    I am one of those people.
    For the past 3 years I suffer L5S1 disc hernia, the most common type of hernia.
    But each case is slightly different and that makes it very difficult to treat.
    In my case I also have hyperlordosis, scoliosis and spina bifida.
    I have been trying countless treatments and supposed cures. I was often left in disappointment but fortunately found some sources of relief.
    I'm not a doctor, just a student with lots of experience with a mother which is a doctor.
    At this time, despite my efforts, I have reached a point where I need surgery.
    But if I have had the experience and the knowledge I have now I could have avoided this complicated situation for sure.
    That's why I made a PDF with my experience and everything I’ve investigated and used to relieve my pain over the years.

    I offer this guide for FREE to those who ask me by mail to this address.
    dibujantesautocadrb(at)gmail(dot)com


    Since my insurance does not cover this type of operation I'm asking for help through the IndieGoGo platform. Through a donation you can get the PDF, “Herniated Disc Pain Relief and Treatments Guide”. Through this platform I will also answer any questions you may have about the subject.

    If you share this link, make a donation or just give it a like on facebook or tweeter you’d be helping me greatly.
    w w w (dot)indiegogo(dot)com/herniatesdiscrelief

    There I explain who I am and where I come from, watch it if you can and share it if you like it.
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  7. #6  
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    Absolutly do not go to a chiroprator. Chiroparacty is not evidence based healthcare. It is dangerous and makes unrealistic claims for success. Any MD who is recommending them should also be treated with a high degree of caution. Physical thearapists are OK. Research malpractice claims against chiropractors. Not judgements against, look for claims settled out of court. Their standard practice is to settle rather than allow cases to be decided against them.
    adelady likes this.
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  8. #7  
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    I'd say no to the chiropractor.

    A good physical therapist would be your best bet. If you can find a sports injury clinic they sometimes have really good therapists. You should already have a set of mild, easy stretching movements - not "exercises" at this stage - to release some pressure in that area. It will not be quick to get over. You might also have to use hot packs and cold packs - seeing as this has been going on for a while the muscles in that area will also be a bit skew whiff, too tight in some places, too short in others. But you'd need a therapist to work out what you need to do for that.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  9. #8  
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    just take oxycodone man works like a charm.
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