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Thread: Ovaries , tubal ligations and cysts.

  1. #1 Ovaries , tubal ligations and cysts. 
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    How likely is it for cysts to occur post tubal ligation ? And how quickly does the body presumably re-absorb the released ova that can no longer pass through the fallopian tubes? Are there any serious health risks associated with tubal ligations?


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    Forum Freshman Numii's Avatar
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    http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/ova...ysttalkabo.htm

    Here's something you might find helpful.

    What are the health risks of tubal ligation?

    "Depending on the sterilization technique used, between 800 and 2,000 women per 100,000 can expect a major complication at the time of operation," according to the Alan Guttmacher Institute.5

    Minilaparotomy patients may suffer from such complications as infection, injury to the bladder or bleeding from a major blood vessel, and burning of the bowel or other structures. There also can be anesthesia complications.6

    Laparoscopy has serious complications such as perforation of the bowel leading to massive infection of the abdominal cavity, complications from anesthesia, improper clearance of the windpipe during the operation, even pulmonary embolism.7 Dr. H.P. Dunn noted, "Every operation carries the risk of hemorrhage or infection... Some patients have died from cardiac failure during the inflation procedure. Others have suffered wounds of the bowel, bladder, and large blood vessels. Even intraperitoneal explosions have occurred." 8


    What are the long-term health risks?

    Apart from these immediate complications of surgery post-tubal problems are so frequent they are now called "post tubal ligation syndrome." A review of the literature on post-tubal ligation problems by Drs. Joel Hargrove and Guy Abraham revealed an incidence of long-term complications in as many as 22 to 37% of sterilized women.9

    Dr. Vicki Hufnagel, a surgeon who specializes in restoring women’s reproductive organs, has written "Many post-tubal patients who come to my office seeking relief complain bitterly if more severe cramps, heavier. longer periods, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, pain with intercourse, and pelvic pain or pressure."10

    A study in Britain followed 374 post-tubal patients and found that 43% had subsequent gynecological treatment for such conditions as heavy menstrual bleeding, menstrual disturbances requiring hormonal treatments, cervical erosion, ovarian tumors, and recanalization of the fallopian tubes requiring a second operation.11

    Another British study of tubal ligation found a 40% increase in menstrual blood loss; 26% of the group experienced increased menstrual pain. Women who had used the Pill before their tubal ligation reported more of these complains than other patients.12

    A study by James G. Tappan found a 40.7% incidence of menorrhagia and suggested that cystic degeneration of the ovary may result from interruption of blood flow from the uterine artery.13 A longitudinal study of over 8,000 women five years after their tubal ligations found 49% of them suffered heavy periods and 35% reported an increase of severe menstrual cramping.14 The risk of cervical cancer among a study of 489 post-tubal women was 3.5 times the normal rate.15

    As mentioned previously, many couples attempt to have sterilization reversed, though fewer than half of reversals are functionally successful.16 Women who do achieve pregnancy after the reversal of tubal ligation face anywhere from a 4% to 64% increased risk of tubal pregnancy, a life-threatening and psychologically wrenching experience. The rate of risk depended on the procedure used.17

    Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the health risks involved when women voluntarily forego the benefits of future pregnancies. Greater risks of ovarian cancer18 and endometrial cancer19 are associated with having few or no children.


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  4. #3  
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    [quote="Numii"]http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/ovariancysts/a/ovarcysttalkabo.htm

    Here's something you might find helpful. [quote]

    thanks nummi - pretty comprehensive answer.
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