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Thread: Pool table Allergy rash..

  1. #1 Pool table Allergy rash.. 
    Forum Ph.D. Hanuka's Avatar
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    Over many a day I've identified that when I touch the wood coating(lac) with the
    top of my hand the next day it turns red-ish and the skin area gets really dry..

    Question is.. What is the material that I might be allergic to in the wood coating
    (perhaps it's a common one..) and is it an allergy or something else?.. my friends
    seem to be ok after touching it..

    plz halp


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  3. #2  
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    I couldnt tell u specifically what you're allergic to but it does sound like it. As an experiment maybe try touching the back of your hand/arm and seeing if you develop a similar reaction.

    You're friend not developing it is because people develop allergies to different things; so it may not affect him.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    It would likely be something in the stain or finish used on the wood. Which means it could be anything.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Ph.D. Hanuka's Avatar
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    waah, are you sure there's no way to find what I'm allergic to in the wood coating??

    I rly need to knoww...
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  6. #5 Re: Pool table Allergy rash.. 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hanuka
    Over many a day I've identified that when I touch the wood coating(lac) with the
    top of my hand the next day it turns red-ish and the skin area gets really dry..

    Question is.. What is the material that I might be allergic to in the wood coating
    (perhaps it's a common one..) and is it an allergy or something else?.. my friends
    seem to be ok after touching it..

    plz halp
    Were black or dark red 'Chinese lacquers' or 'Vietnamese lacquers' used in finishing any of the wood items? These lacquers conatin urushiol, the same allergen found in poison ivy, and can cause rashes if they are not fully cured, or if they are being subjected to a lot of skin oils.

    article:

    Not every person is allergic to lacquer or subject to ghost obsession.”

    This proverb is widely known in Vietnam. It usually refers to circumstances governed by the laws of fate. Literally, it also realistically and forcefully reflects the mysterious power of “black lacquer.” Lacquer is the resin of certain trees growing only in East Asia whose characteristics vary: Rhus succedanea in Vietnam, Rhus verniciera in Japan and Melanorrhea laccifera in Cambodia. The Vietnamese Rhus succedanea has been known for a long time as the sơn tree, an indigenous name.

    Not everybody can come into contact with the sap of this tree because it could easily result in swelling and an itching rash, particularly on the face. Such a phenomenon is popularly known as “lacquer corrosion”. This will last for several weeks. If, by a stroke of bad luck, someone is attacked by this “invisible” force of lacquer resin, the only way out is … to scratch. However, you will feel a bit of relief if you crumble fresh carambola leaves and rub them on the itchy skin.

    Lacquer resin is noted for its difficult treatment and "caprices": it will wrinkle, dry out and darken instantly when directly exposed to water, wind and sunlight. Lacquer growers can only obtain it between midnight and dawn. The sap thus collected is contained in large bamboo barrels covered tightly by sticking wax paper on their surfaces to make them air-proof. The containers of lacquer are afterwards taken away and left untouched for several months in a cool, dark, well-aired place until the different elements of lacquer settle into three major layers. Only then does the sorting out begin.

    The uppermost layer is lacquer of the first stratum (reddish brown lacquer); it is least sticky, yellowish brown and limpid. The resin is then filtered to completely remove all impurities, put into earthenware or ceramic jars, and continuously and evenly stirred with bamboo or wooden sticks for several hours to get rid of vapour.

    The next layer is lacquer of the second stratum; it is stickier and of darker, yellowish brown colour. Iron containers should now be used. One must stir the resin with an iron rod for several hours to obtain a black, glossy lacquer known as then lacquer. The undermost stratum is very sticky and soft, of muddy yellow colour. It stiffens when dried out and is called hom lacquer.

    Asians have known about the techniques of using lacquer resin from very early times. The Chinese under the Shang dynasty (1384-1111 BC) used lacquer for decorating simple objects made of bamboo and wood because its durability enhanced the use value of these objects. Lacquer also served as an agglutinant in inlay and carving. During several feudal dynasties, lacquer met ornamental needs by highlighting motifs that decorated the palaces of kings, lords and noblemen, as well as other architectural elements, weapons, carriages, musical instruments, and containers and bottles. Hence over time the artistic functions of lacquer became more and more recognized. In Japan, although lacquer was used as early as the 4th century BC, it was confined to items of daily use such as crockery or utensils for making tea. Not until the 4th century AD did the Japanese, along with the Koreans, have contact with the lacquer trade of the Asian continent. They were exposed to the various techniques of inlay, engraving, pumicing and ornamental styles with the basic techniques of making pictures such as drawing on a plane, pumicing, polishing and embossing. Japanese lacquer reached the zenith of its development; its influence grew far beyond the country's borders and spread to European countries.
    ..see link for the rest of the article
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  7. #6  
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    Here is an interesting (and humurous!) article from a person who got rashes from a laquered toilet set and his lacquered mah jong game set:

    http://www.normangoldsteinmd.com/URUSHIOLS.HTML

    it also lists all the possible plant allergins you may come in contact with
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  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D. Hanuka's Avatar
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    THANK YOU VERY MUCH SILYLENE!
    but y'know... I never actually had any problems with lacquer before..
    This is the only case when this rush happens.. maybe its a rare lacquer or a poor
    quality mixture or something?

    There seems to be so many kinds of it.. too difficult to identifyy!!!
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hanuka
    THANK YOU VERY MUCH SILYLENE!
    but y'know... I never actually had any problems with lacquer before..
    This is the only case when this rush happens.. maybe its a rare lacquer or a poor
    quality mixture or something?

    There seems to be so many kinds of it.. too difficult to identifyy!!!
    Yes, look up the subject. Poorly cured natural lacquers cause bad rashes !
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