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Thread: Problem with chewing...Can I drink my lunch?

  1. #1 Problem with chewing...Can I drink my lunch? 
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    Hi
    I am having problem with chewing food properly. Period.
    If I was to blend my food, like tuna/broccoli/rice/ egg - whatever, and drink it instead of badly chewing it, am I doing a favor to my digestion system?
    I am currently blending all sorts of fruit with ginger and apples etc. – on daily bases – after sports an so on. Now I want to drink diner and lunch. I know it sounds disgusting but who cares if it helps my stomach digest food better.
    Is purified food better for stomach? Teeth can newer chew food as good as blender can do that for you.
    I need some opinion please.
    Thank you


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  3. #2  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
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    Well I'm not an expert but I see now harm in eating liquidised food. After all, its all mush after you've chewed it anyway. Most people will blend two kind of food in their mouths anyway, it all ends up mush in the stomach so I can't see any harm in blending and drinking it.

    So what exactly is your problem that is causing you to chew food badly? If its something that your'e local GP Doctor or Dentist could have an explanation for then go and see them, they'll have every solution for you that we can't offer you.

    I don't know if this helps. But technically chewing is the first digestive process in the food's journey through the body; saliva breaks down the food to some extent. But even if the food has not been chewed and has been blended instead, it is still going to hit the second digestive process (in the stomach) no different than if you have chewed it. The only downfall I can see to not chewing is your jaw muscles getting weak, and I don't think thats a forward step towards getting your chewing problems better. But then again I don't know the reasons for the problem in the first place. Go and see and expert, they'll help you no problem.


    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  4. #3  
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    Thank you for your opinion – Doctor –
    The main issue I am having with chewing food is the flatulence.
    It appears no matter what I eat. It looks like when I drink the food it’s not as bad.. However, sometimes it happens even then. Maybe it has to do with improper breathing whilst eating?. My teeth are not perfect either as I am missing 3-4 important ones. I am 40, and no known health problems.
    As far as jaws getting weaker, well, maybe. But some chewing gum should help there.
    Thank you again, I shall get some answers from GP as well.
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  5. #4  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
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    If its flatulence your stomach may be creating too much bacteria to break down the food. I'm not sure that breathing may have something to do with it, but it is possible I suppose. I would suspect that it is your stomach creating too many enzymes and bacteria. But I am no expert.

    This website I have just found may be of some use:

    http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/f/flat...sics.htm#types

    I Hope you solve your predicament.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  6. #5  
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    Perhaps you could reduce the problem by identifying foods that are particularly problematic, such as carbonated drinks and anything that classically causes gas. Obviously this isn't the root problem but it might lessen your suffering. You mentioned that liquifying your food seems to alleviate some of the problem. That suggests to me that the liquification process might be releasing air/gas trapped in the food but since I don't know your diet it's hard to say. The only way I can see breathing having an effect on the situation is if you're gulping down air while swallowing, though this would probably be released as a belch rather than.... ahem.

    I agree with 425's idea that excessive bacteria/enzyme production could be the culprit, a byproduct of their reproduction could well be a gas of some kind.
    Dramatisation; may not have happened.
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  7. #6  
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    You discovered that all sorts of fruit blended with ginger and apples, taken after exercise, doesn't give you flatulence. I doubt this has anything to do with whether it's chewed or blended. In other words if you chew those same foods, at that same time of day, you'll get the same result. Try it.

    One difference in chewing is the action of saliva. This helps convert starches into sugars. Chew a cracker for a while, you'll taste the difference.

    Remember that we do need bacteria to properly digest our food. Normal healthy poop is about 30% bacteria. There's a lot going on in there and it will produce some gas.

    Apparently you have some nasty strains brewing in your intestines. An unusual diet or change of diet may have caused this. Also if you've had diarrhea. Diarrhea is the body's way of flushing out bad bacteria so good bacteria (hopefully) can "reboot" your system... from the appendix reserve incidentally. Still got an appendix? You might try shocking things with... I dunno... block of swiss, pitcher of lager, box of oranges. Stuff that might cull the baddies while leaving the good guys that should tolerate that kind of abuse.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree samcdkey's Avatar
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    You might be lactose intolerant. This is the most common cause of food induced flatulence, apart from that caused by beans. Bacteria are normal components of the intestinal system.

    Eating liquid foods can be a problem in terms of volume interfering with the calorie consumption, bloating and constipation due to lack of stimulation for peristalsis and the inability to meet all nutritional requirements especially vitamins and minerals. I suggest you find out what the problem is, rather than resolve it in this manner.
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