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Thread: Temperature range

  1. #1 Temperature range 
    ox
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    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-57751918

    Temperature range in Canada now between -50C and +50C.

    Any comments on this?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Junior Double Helix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-57751918

    Temperature range in Canada now between -50C and +50C.

    Any comments on this?
    It is a safe bet that this temperature range is going to shift upwardly in coming years.

    Lots of talk about doing something about it. Sadly, there is very little doing anything.

    Which is not surprising. Decades of warnings continue to be met with band-aid solutions, despite all the talk, and continuous warming......


    "Arctic summer sea ice could disappear as early as 2035"

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...e-gone-by-2035


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    Time Lord zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Not denying climate change but just for grins I googled to see if during the last ice age there were temperature swings. Well, there were and it even has a name. No less than 25 abrupt changes occurred during last ice age according to scientists who study this stuff. I’ll provide link but not really sure if it means anything or has similarities to what’s happening today. I only googled this because I figured if there are huge swings during an ice age then why can’t there be huge swings (spikes) when temperatures are moderate?

    https://www.nature.com/scitable/know...-ice-24288097/
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    Forum Junior Double Helix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Not denying climate change but just for grins I googled to see if during the last ice age there were temperature swings. Well, there were and it even has a name. No less than 25 abrupt changes occurred during last ice age according to scientists who study this stuff. I’ll provide link but not really sure if it means anything or has similarities to what’s happening today. I only googled this because I figured if there are huge swings during an ice age then why can’t there be huge swings (spikes) when temperatures are moderate?

    https://www.nature.com/scitable/know...-ice-24288097/

    This is some interesting data regarding temperature swings in the last 80,000 years, before things stabilized in time for us to wreck havoc on the planet. The major shifts in temperature shown by the data are suggested to have occurred by various means, and it would seem that all of them rely on geological, atmospheric and/or oceanic aspects which may no longer be working. And this is why we entered the "modern warm period known as the Holocene", as described in the link.

    If this is the case, wild temperature swings can be ruled out for now, despite their frequency of ca. 3,000-5,000 years a little over 10,000 years ago. Unless of course whatever was causing them to begin with comes back, which seems unlikely as we have entered a new phase and the old cycling appears to have died out. But just because it has taken a pause does not mean that it could not return at any time. With regard to warming, we are already on the upper end of the temperature scale for this time frame (looking closely at the graphic in the link), so going up is clearly an outlier, at least to some extent, and as we all should know, a bad indicator.

    Technically the data shown in the paper is from the last glacial period, which is often called an ice age but is actually a dramatic increase in ice levels expanding from the already frozen polar area of Earth's northern hemisphere during its current, fifth true "ice age," and which is best refereed to as the "Late Cenozoic Ice Age"*. One wonders if the data from earlier glacial periods, which likely occurred during the current ice age, would exhibit similar fluctuations in temperatures. Seems rather likely.


    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Cenozoic_Ice_Age
    Last edited by Double Helix; July 10th, 2021 at 06:26 PM.
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  6. #5  
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    In the 1980's some scientists were telling us that a new ice age was due.

    Now we have record Death Valley temperatures, and we have the world's hottest city - Baghdad, where temperatures rise above 50C.

    Anything above 47C and cell damage occurs.
    We are living on an elderly planet orbiting a mid life star.
    Our activity is just one price to be paid.
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  7. #6  
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    Oymyakon temp range now -50C to +30C.

    https://www.natureworldnews.com/arti...n%20in%20June.
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    Time Lord zinjanthropos's Avatar
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    Are people choosing where to live, with the type of climate one may have to endure in mind? I mean if I choose to live on the leeward side of a mountain as opposed to windward I shouldn’t be surprised to have warmer, drier weather. Then again the rainy side might expose one’s domicile to landslides. Same if I decide to build on a waterfront, there are many calamities associated with that location like floods and ice floes to name a couple. Seems the aesthetically pleasing, most scenic locales are the most exposed to severe weather. Plus there are more of us which means more people building in the bad weather zones. Just a thought, where are the safest from severe weather areas in the world?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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  9. #8  
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    People will live more or less anywhere they can earn a living.
    That includes Oymyakon, but they might take up temporary residence in places even more extreme.

    The British Isles, an archipelago of about 900 islands is safer than most from severe weather, but some areas are sparsely populated.
    Sea erosion off parts of Eastern England is a threat and hilly areas are prone to flooding.
    North West Europe is a fairly safe bet.
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    Have had more rain here than I ever remember in 18 years at this time of the year!!! However if the ocean rises, .......I am glad that we with thoughts of tsunami's didn't want a house right on the ocean....just one where we can see it.........
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  11. #10  
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    More tropical nights this year. I think last year was a record for the UK.
    Few people have air con at home.
    For the last 2 days and nights I've had to use an electric fan for the first time ever.
    Opening windows just lets in more warm air when there is no breeze.

    Also, massive flooding and large loss of life in Germany and Belgium blamed on climate change.
    But what are governments going to do other than make pledges?
    Nothing.

    I think one of the biggest mistakes we've made is ripping down trees.
    They should represent about 97% of the world's biomass.
    Not only do they suck carbon from the atmosphere but they have a cooling influence.
    Some tree replanting has happened but too little and too late.
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