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Thread: Flying

  1. #1 Flying 
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    I'm a professional flight instructor. I especially enjoy aerobatics and soaring. I am priveleged to be an active CFI, CFII, CFIG, MEI, and A&P in upstate NY USA. I'm restoring a Citabria and Cessna 150 right now, and who knows what else after those are back flying. I would enjoy any aviation-related questions or discussion here if any other propeller-heads are so inclined.


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  3. #2  
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    So how do you know when you’ve entered a no-fly zone?


    Theatre is the laboratory of the human soul. – Peter Brook
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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crimson_Scribe
    So how do you know when you’ve entered a no-fly zone?
    You'll know as soon as you see a R-73 speeding towards you
    PDP, VAX and Alpha fanatic ; HP-Compaq is the Satan! ; Let us pray daily while facing Maynard! ; Life starts at 150 km/h ;
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  5. #4  
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    No-fly zones are well-depicted on charts, in aviation GPS maps/databases, with the exception of Presidential Movements. When the POTUS is traveling, his minders put up aerial dragnets for the unwary not everywhere he goes, but at random times. These can be discovered in time to avoid them by talking to Flight Service, Air Traffic Control, and the AOPA Online website. This would also be helpful information if you are an assassin, stupid enough to think Dubya runs the country, who is curious where he is so that you can position your truck-bomb close enough to the motorcade stops to be effective.

    Anyway, although small aircraft pose little threat to anyone (truck bombs being a much greater threat due to payload, ubiquitousness and inconspicuousness) they are like large aircraft under little threat of shoot-down, even though the Homeland Security charade would lead the public to believe otherwise.

    From airport "security" games to color-coded alerts, America's post 9-11 contortions are almost entirely designed as political window-dressing to help the most child-like of Americans feel safer, and even more importantly, to provide political cover for corporate controllers worried more about the political future of their "public servant" sock-puppets than they are about safety of the public.

    Hot aircraft debris raining into the streets of a city, possibly peppered with the gorily splatting body parts of a lobbyist or financial tycoon, or just a pretty dear-departed face on CNN, well it's not good for the business of controlling government as it has evolved in the USA. It is not desireable for the powers that be to confuse their opiated public with clear indications that government is nearly powerless to protect the public from concerted terrorism, and things will always be so, and more so, as technology advances onward.

    Progressive society is inherently vulnerable to terrorrism, and therefore the only best policy in mitigating the risk is to simply avoid pissing off millions of people in volatile parts of the world, regardless of the mineral resources the hapless non-americans struggle to prosper above, while their post-eurocolonial, and neo-amero-colonial fat-cats disenfranchise them, and while thousands of completely innocent religious comrades are bing killed at Americn hands monthly. If US foreign policy could turn around into policies more respectful of the sovereignties and cultural distinctness of other countries and the persons residing within, we would need fear little in the way of terrorist threat, and we wouldn't be zigging and zagging many miles off course to avoid ludicrous protect-the-Prez no-fly-zones, as we fly over our fruited plains, rich with human and natural resources that are more than enough for Americans o prosper on, without coveting foreign resources, and stirring up long and bitter asymmetrical conflicts.
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  6. #5 Re: Flying 
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypewaders
    I'm a professional flight instructor. I especially enjoy aerobatics and soaring. I am priveleged to be an active CFI, CFII, CFIG, MEI, and A&P in upstate NY USA. I'm restoring a Citabria and Cessna 150 right now, and who knows what else after those are back flying. I would enjoy any aviation-related questions or discussion here if any other propeller-heads are so inclined.
    Thank you for letting us ask you questions.

    Are they still using the E-6B today as they did back in the 50's when I studied for my flying licence?

    How old to you have to be today to get a licence to fly?

    Why do the rudders fall off the Airbus, do you have any ideas?

    What do you think is the best twin turbo prop aircraft, still the King Air?

    What type of aircraft do you own and what is the best aircraft that you've ever flown?

    How can this problem be solved: http://www.justplanesense.com/images/Kid2Work.JPG

    Thank you for taking the time to address these as well as future questions.
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    The E6-B is verry much in use today especially during primary training. Electronic calculators hard-programmed with E6B functions are acceptable, but the rotary slide-rule without decimals forces common sense into every equation- So I prefer the original.

    Best airplanes is a very subjective thing, I have enjoyed flying a Tiger Moth, Stampe, Zlin 526, and various Cubs and other old taildraggers. I have a Citabria 7KCAB and 2 Cessna 150 trainers. I like almost everything that flies, but most enjoy stick-and-rudder simple oldies.

    IMO all twins, turboprops, and jets are great transports, but honestly boring to fly. Except when the stabilizers harmonically vibrate, delaminate, and leave the airplane without warning. The Airbus V.stabilizer failure was a manufacturing flaw, that has been covered up to protect Airbus reputation and trading stocks. Any airplane you can't manhandle, including full rudder deflection at departure and approach speeds, is patently unsafe. The rest of the fleet has long been carefully inspected, but the curing flaw in the ill-fated Airbus is not for public disclosure, but is obvious to aviators.

    I once was a freight pilot, but I find flight instructing far more rewarding and interesting, so that's what I focus on. I love what I do, and with care I can pay all my bills too. I'm 40 years old, and plan to own many more airplanes before I'm through flying some distant day.

    To earn a Private Pilot License in the USA you must be 17. You can solo at 16. Gliders can be solo-ed at 14 years of age. My Private Pilot students usually have spent about $5k over 6 months to 1 year of training, including about 20 hours dual and 30 hours solo training.
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  8. #7  
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    I flew gliders myself for a year. I got rejected at the medical test because of a heart condition they discovered Flight simulators are really great these days. Check out his EUR 1124,55 USB device. Works with MS flightsim:

    http://users.telenet.be/theportablec...tepECmovie.wmv
    PDP, VAX and Alpha fanatic ; HP-Compaq is the Satan! ; Let us pray daily while facing Maynard! ; Life starts at 150 km/h ;
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    Loading the movie... In the USA, no medical certificate is required to fly gliders. Additionally, no medical certificate is required to fly simple light single-engine aircraft under the new Sport Pilot certification category. That's reason enough for a vacation visit. I'm n ot current on European rules, which are evolving significantly right now.

    I'm heading down to the Orlando, Florida area in a couple of weeks to enjoy advancing my soaring skills at Seminole Lake Gliderport.

    As for now, I'm dropping off a friend in the Hamptons on Long Island today, and it's a sparkling, beautiful morning here. I'll be admiring NYC from the air again in less than an hour. Wherever you are, there's no excuse not to fly if it strikes your fancy.
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    I did take a look at the engine cluster- That's the sight and sound of starting, very faithful to what I remember from my air freight days (yawn). Yes, turboprops are technically beautiful, but operationally so simple.

    More to my taste is yelling "CLEAR" and toggling the starter on an aggressive little biplane: Starter whoops, then all together a stacatto roar begins, the airplane/pilot assembly (tightly strapped in) is immediately shaken on the longitudinal axis (inclined to the waiting sky) and a thick blue cloud of smoke passes the cockpit. You can taste that fleeting cloud, and as you push in the throttle for taxi, torque twists the airplane left a bit, and the big radial lopes into a syncopated percussion bit that you can feel in your chest.

    So much better than beginning a flight in one of those boring transport types- Yes, transport planes small and large have a certain elegance, but they just don't raise my pulserate. And beyond watching very predictable starting temp rise, acceleration, and unvarying operational torques and temps, there's just nothing to do with turbines- And their unfiltered song really is too obnoxious for the human ear. But a big old piston radial sings to me, in concert with the flying wires, accompanying the whole sweeping vista of the horizon rolling around my wings, and as green fields or mountain peaks sweep close beneath them to complete the picture. As with sex, "as real as it gets" by simulation just isn't real, or intimate, enough.

    I am, however, intrigued for short periods with FS2002, IL-2 and other sims, and I recommend MSFS to all my students because it can be used to learn a great deal about procedures and physics of flight- So I do have much appreciation for sims. But if the thought of flying gets your pulse up even a tiny bit- then by all means one should occasionally and literally GO FLYING! Logically, the first step is to go to an airport. Money is not always necessary.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypewaders
    I am, however, intrigued for short periods with FS2002, IL-2 and other sims.
    My favorite flight simulator still is A-10 Cuba! That's just such a great plane to fly. Incredible low speed handeling. I refuse to land the aircraft in a normal way. I always cross the runway threshold at a 90 degree angle, close the throttles, push the nose down, full roll and full rudder, lower gear, use the speedbrake and land slipping sideways on the runway
    PDP, VAX and Alpha fanatic ; HP-Compaq is the Satan! ; Let us pray daily while facing Maynard! ; Life starts at 150 km/h ;
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  12. #11  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    How do we prevent this type of thing from happening?

    http://www.justplanesense.com/images/Kid2Work.JPG
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    Well, poverty is a pretty good reason to stay out of the air. My father was a flight instructor, and spent most of the last two decades of his life doing sheetmetal work on airliners. My brother followed him into that business. Good money when you can work, but lots of moving around/slack time.

    My father had his own business recoving fabric skinned aircraft back in the 70's, but he wasn't a very good businessman, so it failed. I was just a kid at the time, but it was interesting to see aircraft stripped down and rebuilt like that. I also got to spend a part of one summer sanding down his friends AT-6 Texan for a new coat of paint.

    I'm a flight sim addict, I spend too much time playing iL2/Forgotten Battles. About the only flying I do.
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    Cosmictraveler, just turn on the wipers to get rid of that problem and hope yah
    dont suck it in a turbin.

    Flying, lets out a big sigh. Fixed wing, or rotary wing, just not a transport. LOL
    Think of wing suits and jet packs in a big air filled cavern on the moon. Float, trike,
    and tail dragger experience, but would give my left nut to fly a hot stunt ship or jet.
    But have settled for thoughts and engineering of flying underwater.
    It's not what you know or don't know, but what you know that isn't so that will hurt you. Will Rodgers 1938
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypewaders
    The Airbus V.stabilizer failure was a manufacturing flaw, that has been covered up to protect Airbus reputation and trading stocks. Any airplane you can't manhandle, including full rudder deflection at departure and approach speeds, is patently unsafe. The rest of the fleet has long been carefully inspected, but the curing flaw in the ill-fated Airbus is not for public disclosure, but is obvious to aviators.
    Airbus made no effort to rectify the flaw ? it is surprising really.
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    On the airbus: nothing so conspiratorial- Composite structures just don't always come out the same, because they have more complex manufacturing processes, with more critical variables like temperature for example. What rankled me was the corporate spin, cooperated with by federal aviation authorities, that announced that pilots should not be making full rudder inputs. That's just bullshit, and they know it.


    On the affordability of flying: I take many people flying gratis on a regular basis, and so do many of my friends. If you approach the wrong crowd, such as a flight school or corporate flight department about the simple joy of flying, then the reality will often be drowned out by human hangups and illusions about money.

    You can own a wonderful and reliable airplane for the price of a car. You can join a partnership for much less. There are airports, usually grass strips, where shared enthusiasm literally lifts everybody, including those who come with little or no money. I have trained and flown with a lot of people, and the amount of money a person has has much less to do with their success rate than their love for flying, and willingness to participate in caring for airplanes. As with anything, will is a much more influential factor than financial standing. But because the most apparent facets of aviation (to the general public) are the jet-set "bling" and the flight schools, the vibrant fraternity of avid aviators from all walks of life is unseen. But we're out there. Go to the smallest airports you can find- spend some time being helpful and friendly- then see what happens.

    On failing in the small airplane business: I suppose I have have "failed" many times but never quit. I have just gone outside of aviation for some added income again, and I'm returning to flying/aircraft maintenance full-time with better business ideas now. I don't give it up, because it is my life. I have 2 airplanes that I must put together now, a Cessna 150 being reborn as a taildragger, and a 7KCAB Citabria just being reborn like before. It's a lot of work, and money gets tight for me. Failure isn't an option because for as long as one is directing efforts toward goals one is passionate about, IMO that's a successful life, immeasurable in monetary units.

    I have less than $15 in my pocket. I don't have a Retirement Plan (othher than accruing a collection of appreciating flying machines), or stock portfolio. I'm leaving right now to haul up some skydivers. If you were to show up when I land today, I would certainly give you a biplane ride for the asking. Cheers!
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypewaders
    I did take a look at the engine cluster- That's the sight and sound of starting, very faithful to what I remember from my air freight days (yawn). Yes, turboprops are technically beautiful, but operationally so simple.
    I'm sure you wouldn't say no to flying this beauty:







    PDP, VAX and Alpha fanatic ; HP-Compaq is the Satan! ; Let us pray daily while facing Maynard! ; Life starts at 150 km/h ;
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    A beauty indeed. Unfortunately the Starships came out hugely overweight, and never performed as intended. Beechcraft is now chopping every one up that they can buy back, because they do not want to support or carry manufacturer liability for them. I've seen a few survivors around still flying, but soon there will be only a very few left flying.

    The Piaggio Avanti has been enjoying something of a comeback- it's not a pure canard, but is also a pretty twin turboprop pusher with the same engines as the Starship. The Avanti has all the performance that was dreamed of with the Starship and then some.
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypewaders
    A beauty indeed. Unfortunately the Starships came out hugely overweight, and never performed as intended.
    The overweight was forced upon them by the FAA because they didn't want to certify the original structural design. Still, even with the extra weight the Starship performs great.

    Beechcraft is now chopping every one up that they can buy back, because they do not want to support or carry manufacturer liability for them.
    Yeah. That's just so sad I have a nice mental picture that would bring swift justice to the people that made this decission. Just put them in an old, ugly aircraft and introduce them to one of the other Raytheon products. Say hello to Mr. Patriot PAC-3 :wink:

    I've seen a few survivors around still flying, but soon there will be only a very few left flying.
    Only four according to Robert Scherer's website. At least the one Bob owns will never be scrapped. Long live the Starship 8)
    PDP, VAX and Alpha fanatic ; HP-Compaq is the Satan! ; Let us pray daily while facing Maynard! ; Life starts at 150 km/h ;
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  20. #19  
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    :? cool ... i wann fly.
    tell me.. waht are there )if any( restrictions to getting a piolets licence?
    (obviously different countrys change laws.. but in your Us Of A will do grand)
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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  21. #20  
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    Be a Pilot is a website with a wealth of information on getting started.

    In the USA, you can begin training at any age, solo at 16 years, and earn a passenger-carrying (Private or Sport Pilot) certificate at 17.

    For the Private Pilot License, 40 hours minimum flight training is required. At about 12 hours most students solo, and from that point about 50% of the flight training is solo (and $30 cheaper, without paying me to come along). Most people take a little longer- the more frequently you can fly, the less reviewing of flight lessons will occur, the better you will retain what you learn, and the less you will invest in earning your license. Students of mine who have flown at least once weekly average around 50 flight hours completing their Private Pilot training, and spend about $5k total on their training- more is spent if training is infrequent, and a bit less if time and budget allow accelerated training. The difference is great enough that financing flight training, if necessary, can be a wise choice that allows a pilot to progress rapidly and save on the total investment.

    The USA is a far less expensive country to learn to fly in than most, and many pilots from around the world earn their wings here, and then convert their certificates (with fees, sometimes tests/additional training) to their home country. This is because all flying expenses are lower in the USA, especially fuel and airport user fees. For most European countries except the UK, the transition from US to Euro licensing is not too difficult or expensive. The British are a little bit tougher on those who begin in America, but it is still cheaper (airfare and lodging included) for Brits to train in America. As for myself, the relative affordability of flying here is the primary factor that keeps me residing in the USA.

    Aircraft rental typically is "wet", meaning that fuel expenses are included with an hourly operational rate. For example, if you rent a Cessna 150 from me for a day, and fly from Cooperstown, NY to Boston, MA and return the next day, your cost would be about $350 for the flight time only ($60/hr * 5hours flightt time). I request that those who take the airplane away for more than one 24-hour period buy at least 4 hours of time per day, so that the airplanes do not sit idle too much. Profit margins in a small flight school are very slim, so I have to be careful about details like this.

    Wherever you live, it is worthwhile if you are thinking about becoming a pilot to visit your nearest small airport and ask around about an introductory flight. But be warned, although quite a safe activity, flying is highly addictive. Good luck!
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  22. #21 Re: Flying 
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hypewaders
    I'm a professional flight instructor. I especially enjoy aerobatics and soaring. I am priveleged to be an active CFI, CFII, CFIG, MEI, and A&P in upstate NY USA. I'm restoring a Citabria and Cessna 150 right now, and who knows what else after those are back flying. I would enjoy any aviation-related questions or discussion here if any other propeller-heads are so inclined.


    What did you think of the last disaster when they converted two biplanes into jet powered aircraft and they collided and killed both pilots?
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    It's sickening for me. I met Bobby Younkin some years back at airshows. I hadn't seen his latest act with "Masters of Disaster" as they were billed. I had heard a lot of talk about it, because they were very much over the top, and very entertaining.

    However chaotic the act appeared, it was like any major airshow act under much FAA scrutiny. Every detail was certainly planned and executed with safety first in mind. However, in multi-airplane aerobatics, it only takes a short miscue to lose the picture, and if luck is against you in that instant, then you can have a midair. Bobby lost sight of Jimmy Franklin probably for an instant, and fate was unforgiving.

    I delivered skydivers, flew biplane aerobatics, attacked toilet-paper streamers, gave kids airplane rides, competed in landing contests, etc. all day long today. Like any situation where there are multiple planes to keep track of while having a gret deal of fun, keeping safe separation whatever we are doing has to be in the forefront of consciousness at all times for pilots who enjoy advancing their skills and letting the public in on a taste of the exuberance and thrill that is possible with the better flying machines.

    The longer we fly this way, and the more friends and mentors we occasionally lose to unforgiving reality, the more vigilant we try to become- all the while knowing that Bobby was certainly thinking intently about collision avoidance through his last routine, but mentally slipped on a banana peel at a highly unfortunate instant, when the penalty was humiliating, unnecessary, and horrifying (but swift) death. I'm a little sad, and a little more vigilant with every tragedy like this.
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  24. #23  
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    Let me put my question another way. The biplanes were converted into jets doesn't that affect them adversly for they were never ment to fly that fast were they? Couldn't that have also been part of the problem for trying to learn a new type of aircraft configuration while trying to perform tricky areobatics is , to me, a very volitile mix.
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    Actually only Jimmy Franklin's Biplane had the addition of a J-85 turbojet on the belly. He was no amatuer as a pilot and builder, and the point of the modification was not at all to go faster- Jimmy's modified WACO had fantastic vertical performance, noise, and uniqueness purely for wowing everyone at airshows. It's highly unlikely that the installation of the turbine on the belly of Jimmy's WACO had anything to do with the collision. As I've already speculated, the most likely cause is a momentary lapse in situational awareness that is always potentially fatal when performing formation flight and multi-aircraft close maneuvering.

    Samson (Bobby Younkin's plane) was a big, beautiful modern elaboration on the biplane theme that was built around the wonderful, proven M-14 radial piston engine from Russia. She was a conventional, but thoroughly modern, strong, and powerful biplane. In the poor-quality video I've seen of the collision, it seems to me that Samson slammed into the WACO from below and behind, relative to the jet-augmented biplane. It appears to me as if the J-85 on the belly of the WACO exploded instantly as contact was made.

    If Jimmy was not completely out of position as they closed on that pass, then it could be that Bobby lost sight at the wrong moment, and picked the wrong piece of sky for the break. In any joining/close pass maneuver, one pilot is lead (just flying the maneuver) and the other has the responsibility of maintaining visual separation making the join or pass. If the joining wingman loses sight even for the briefest instant, then a safe and preplanned break away from the leader's trajectory is executed. This is oversimplifying the entire sequence, because there were probably multiple exchanges of lead/wing on each close pass and join in the very intense sequence they were performing. But on each close pass, one pilot was "just" flying, the other making the approach with constant visual contact essential to safety.

    I strongly suspect that there was a critical miscue and someone slipped out of position. Lead was left in the joiner's blind spot (perhaps behind Bobby's upper wings) at the worst possible instant, and they came together. This error could have the same unforgiving result regardless of what these men were flying, however many wings, and whatever engines were bolted on.
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  26. #25  
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    thank you !
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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