Notices
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Has this theory ever been thought of?

  1. #1 Has this theory ever been thought of? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9
    Hey, I was thinking of something while watching something on blackholes on science channel. Maybe the theory was already thought of or it has too many flaws but I will post it anyways.

    Every galaxy is thought to have a blackhole in the middle, sucking matter in. Maybe the black hole could suck all the matter from the specific galaxy and there could be an attraction between all the black holes in every single galaxy. All the black-holes with the matter from each galaxy could join together and keep contracting and eating itself up until it can't hold anymore. When it cannot hold anymore, it would most likely explode, sending atoms/matter all over the empty universe(universe would obviously would be empty because all the matter is in the blackhole). It basically is a combination of the black hole theory and Big bang in one. It would answer one question: Our universe is a cycle - it didn't begin from nothing. Matter was always here but the cycle of black-holes sucking in all matter and then exploding in Big Bang style continued since infinite times. Maybe this kind of theory already exists but I don't know of any.

    It has 2 possible flaws(I am sure there are more but this are the 2 I can think of atm):
    1) How could there have always been matter and energy present, circling around infinitely? It had to have come from something.

    2) There is no way to prove this but if this theory is true then there must have been organisms/organic molecules before all the blackholes sucked each-other+matter in and created the last Big bang explosion. So that means that all complex organic materials will be gone EVEN if we learn how to move away from Earth and learn to live in space. Nothing can resist a blackhole that we know of UNLESS if we find out a way to leave our known universe and get away from blackholes. If we can do that, it just disproves that time and space bends infinitely(I could be wrong but if time/space bends infinitely then we are unable to leave our own universe because we would be going around in circles infinitely, even though it may seem we are going straight infinitely). This isn't exactly a flaw but it would disprove what one genius[einstein] thought. Again, of course I could have a lot of this wrong but I am just speculating. :P

    edit: One kind of energy just turns into some other different form of energy(or solid maybe if enough energy is applied according to E=MC^2) so energy is basically doing a cycle if it cannot be completely removed from existance. That cycle could be applied to this "theory" perhaps and could be one thing to backup this 'cycling' theory.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    London, although I'm often in the land of nod...
    Posts
    9
    Well I don't know enough on astrophysics to comment on the black hole-big bang theory but your first flaw isn't a flaw. Consider this: if there was nothing- how could there be something afterwards anyway? It tends to be impossible for humans to grasp the concept of forever in terms of no beginning and no ending. Or at least that's what a rather clever person told me.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Guest
    The attractive force of an entire galaxay would be the same if all that matter in the galaxy were contained in a black hole, (that it to anything outside tha galaxy). The galaxies appear to be flying apart so they won't all end up together.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    The attractive force of an entire galaxay would be the same if all that matter in the galaxy were contained in a black hole, (that it to anything outside tha galaxy). The galaxies appear to be flying apart so they won't all end up together.
    So you are saying that there would be no attraction between all the black holes? What if the black hole is supermassive and has LOTS of energy, strong enough to pull other galaxies? Isn't there any way it can pull in near galaxies and other blackholes?
    We don't know enough about black-holes yet to answer a lot of those questions. All we pretty much know is that they exist and pull everything in and that it is so strong that even light cannot escape. Everything else is pretty much theory or prediction. Also, our Milky Way galaxy is supposedly going to collide with Andromeda in a couple billion years or something. For all we know, it can perhaps even merge the 2 galaxies due to gravity. If galaxies collide a lot like that, isn't there a way that the blackholes could grow during the collision and eat each other up, forming a gigantic supermassive black-hole(bigger than what we noticed so far)?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Guest
    What I am saying is, that a galaxy has a certain amount of mass, whether it's in a single black hole or 1/2 a trillion stars. This will have a gravitational attraction to other galaxies (we think) but they seem to be moving apart which means, either gravity has some lower quantum limit or there's something we are not aware of (ie dark energy). THere is supposed to be a giant black hole at the centre of our galaxy (about 30,000 Light years away). I suspect even the largest of black holes would not swallow it's own galaxy though quasars may come close to it. Any black hole as big as you propose would have long ago swollowed everything it could IMO.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9
    I understand where you are coming from. I just thought of something else. Perhaps maybe when the big bang took place, it happened with so much force that it kept expanding all the matter everywhere(even gravity wasn't strong enough to resist the energy from big bang. Just think how weak gravity is. We are able to move around and resist earth's gravity as if it's nothing. If gravity was as strong as people think, we wouldn't be able to move at all or even climb mountains or have the ability to jump). Anyways, that force could still not have completely dissapated so the universe still keeps expanding even today. As soon as that force/energy disappates, gravity will be strong enough to be able to pull everything back together - black holes can contribute to that pull back of matter. (That is if the universe has a certain limit. If matter is spread out infinitely then gravity wouldn't be strong enough).
    For example, if you tie a tennis ball to a rubber string and you punch the tennis ball out. Eventually the ball WILL come back, depending on how hard you punched it. The energy of the punch is only so strong that it will eventually lose that movement due to the string slowing down that movement and then be pulled back by the string back to it's starting point(where you originally punched it from). The ball can represent matter, the rubber string can represent gravity and the hand can represent the big bang. I dunno if you understand what I mean by this example.

    "Any black hole as big as you propose would have long ago swollowed everything it could IMO."

    Not if the bigbang was as strong as thought of. The force of expansion from the big bang could force all the blackholes to spread out. Soon as the expansion stops, gravity would be strong enough to pull everything close slowly. If that happens, black-holes would be able to start sucking everything closeby in. I am not sure if you see my point here or not. I just dunno how else to explain it :P
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Guest
    AH but the galaxies appear to be accelerating, if this is the case and gravity is getting weaker then they won't [collapse back in]. Your tennis ball analogy is basically flawed, as the elastic gets longer it's pull becomes greater, gravity is the opposite it gets weaker with distance. If there is a quantum lower limit to gravity then at a certain distance it will simply cease to have any effect.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    London, although I'm often in the land of nod...
    Posts
    9
    Well they still teach the 'big crunch' theory at school at A-level standard, andthey say that because we don't know the mass of the universe, it is still possible that the rate of expansion could slow, stop, and then start contractingback inwards. We also learn the steady state theory which says that the universe will keep expanding forever. As they tell us, it all depends on the mass of the universe- if it is larger than the 'critical mass' then gravity is insufficient to pull everything back and we have the steady state, if the mass is less than this critical mass then we crunch back to a single point...

    WWW
    > <
    MMMM

    (That's us being crunched...)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •