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Thread: Best scientists' quotes

  1. #1 Best scientists' quotes 
    ox
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    What are your favourites?
    Most of mine were from Einstein.

    I never think of the future. It will come soon enough.

    If A = success, then A = X + Y * Z, where X = work, Y = play, Z = keeping your mouth shut.

    Only 2 things are infinite: the Universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.


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  3. #2  
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    Immanuel Kant has some good quotes:

    https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/immanuel_kant


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  4. #3  
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    What did Kant actually contribute to science?

    Louis Agassiz (palaeontologist):
    "Every great scientific truth goes through 3 stages.
    First, people say it conflicts with the Bible.
    Next they say it had been discovered before.
    Lastly they say they always believed it."

    "I cannot afford to waste my time making money."
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    What did Kant actually contribute to science?
    Here is an article about Immanuel Kant and his contributions to the philosophy of ethics, metaphysics, and other disciplines.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immanuel_Kant
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Here is an article about Immanuel Kant and his contributions to the philosophy of ethics, metaphysics, and other disciplines.
    Still not sure about this. Metaphysics means beyond physics and so cannot be considered science.

    JBS Haldane (evolutionary biologist) was struck by the abundance of beetles which he mentioned many times in an attempt to doubt God and His creation.

    "God has an inordinate fondness for beetles."
    "J.B.S.H. himself had an inordinate fondness for the statement: he repeated it frequently. More often than not it had the addition: "God has an inordinate fondness for stars and beetles." . . . Haldane was making a theological point: God is most likely to take trouble over reproducing his own image, and his 400,000 attempts at the perfect beetle contrast with his slipshod creation of man. When we meet the Almighty face to face he will resemble a beetle (or a star)"
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Here is an article about Immanuel Kant and his contributions to the philosophy of ethics, metaphysics, and other disciplines.
    Still not sure about this. Metaphysics means beyond physics and so cannot be considered science.
    Metaphysics is considered a branch of philosophy. Is philosophy considered a science? Certainly logic can be applied to philosophy, and logic can sometimes be quantified, which is math, and science often depends on logic and math.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Is philosophy considered a science?
    While science was originally called natural philosophy, and no doubt inspired scientific enquiry, today it cannot be considered science. What problems has philosophy ever solved in relation to knowledge of life and the universe?
    I think you should take little or no notice of philosophers' quotes, and those of scientists are so much better.
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  9. #8 About the theoretical physicist paul dirac. 
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    "Well,well, our friend Dirac has a religion and its guiding principle is - there is no God and Dirac is his prophet."
    From Dirac's brother-in -law, the scientist, Eugene Wigner.
    I meant to put this post into the thread on "best scientist quotes". Done. (Dywyddyr)
    A mistake on my part!
    Last edited by Dywyddyr; August 10th, 2018 at 07:58 AM.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Is philosophy considered a science?
    While science was originally called natural philosophy, and no doubt inspired scientific enquiry, today it cannot be considered science. What problems has philosophy ever solved in relation to knowledge of life and the universe?
    I think you should take little or no notice of philosophers' quotes, and those of scientists are so much better.
    Thanks, I was unsure if philosophy was a science or not. I am not sure if philosophy has ever solved any problems related to knowledge of life or the universe.
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  11. #10  
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    Einstein did not believe in a personal God. Here's why:

    "Scientific research is based on the idea that everything that takes place is determined by laws of nature, and therefore this holds for the action of people. For this reason, a research scientist will hardly be inclined to believe that events could be influenced by a prayer, i.e. by a wish addressed to a Supernatural Being."
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halliday View Post
    "Well,well, our friend Dirac has a religion and its guiding principle is - there is no God and Dirac is his prophet."
    I like the Dirac unit. https://ideaisaacjoking.blogspot.com...nit-dirac.html

    Similar to Einstein's 'If A = success, then A = X + Y * Z, where X = work, Y = play, Z = keeping your mouth shut.'
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Halliday View Post
    "Well,well, our friend Dirac has a religion and its guiding principle is - there is no God and Dirac is his prophet."
    I like the Dirac unit. https://ideaisaacjoking.blogspot.com...nit-dirac.html

    Similar to Einstein's 'If A = success, then A = X + Y * Z, where X = work, Y = play, Z = keeping your mouth shut.'
    The Dirac unit is enjoyable.
    Apparently when Dirac introduced his wife, to another, he often referred to her by saying "this is Wigner's sister"!
    Of course, Dirac was a genius and any odd behaviour on his part would normally be tolerated, and, in fact, usually seen as evidence of his outstanding intellect.
    Last edited by Halliday; August 13th, 2018 at 05:25 AM.
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  14. #13  
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    Dirac didn't like poets but he made the statement ''You pick the flower on Earth and you move the farthest star", which sounds poetic to me.
    The aim of science is to make difficult things understandable in a simpler way; the aim of poetry is to state simple things in an incomprehensible way. The two are incompatible.
    Everything that has mass exerts a gravitational force and so each particle is attracting every other particle of the universe, is what I think he was trying to say.
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    I do not mind if you think slowly. But I do object when you publish more quickly than you think - Wolfgang Pauli.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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    Not sure about the exact quote but paraphrasing Richard Feynman:-
    If scientists are moved out of their field of expertise it is certain they will have the ability to speak as much nonsense as the rest of us!
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  17. #16  
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    Feynman, like Dirac, didn't appear to like poets.
    "Poets say that science takes away the beauty of the stars, mere globs of gas atoms".

    As for Bohr, when Dirac went to Copenhagen: "Dirac seems to know a lot about physics but he never says anything".

    In the US in 1929 the Wisconsin State Journal interviewed Dirac:

    Reporter: Now doctor will you give me in a few words the low-down on all your investigations?
    Dirac: No.

    Reporter: Will it be all right if I put it this way, 'Professor Dirac solves all the problems of mathematical physics, but is unable to find a better way of figuring out Babe Ruth's batting average'?
    Dirac: Yes.

    Reporter: What do you like best in America?
    Dirac: Potatoes.

    Reporter: Same here. What is your favourite sport?
    Dirac: Chinese chess.

    Reporter: Do you go to the movies?
    Dirac: Yes.

    Reporter: When?
    Dirac: In 1920, perhaps also in 1930.
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  18. #17  
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    "We build too many walls and not enough bridges." -- Isaac Newton
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  19. #18  
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    Attributed to Isaac, but may have been Joseph Fort Newton, or both.

    I'm sure this was Isaac:
    "I do not know what I may appear to the world; but to myself, I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself now and then in finding a smoother pebble or prettier shell than ordinary, while the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me."

    Similar to Plato's Cave Analogy?
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Attributed to Isaac, but may have been Joseph Fort Newton, or both.

    I'm sure this was Isaac:
    "I do not know what I may appear to the world; but to myself, I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself now and then in finding a smoother pebble or prettier shell than ordinary, while the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me."

    Similar to Plato's Cave Analogy?
    What is Plato's Allegory of the Cave about and how exactly does it relate to your quote?
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  21. #20  
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    For me Plato's Allegory of the Cave is about opening up from one's original narrow reality into the true nature of reality.
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  22. #21  
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    Lawrence Krauss is an admirer of Plato's cave analogy (or allegory). The occupants can only understand reality from what they observe. Whatever is outside is hidden from view. There is always going to be an ocean of truth waiting to be discovered. In our case, the deeper we look more wonders are likely to be known.
    What is a universe and why should it exist at all? Can't answer this at the moment and it probably requires a new mathematics (smoother pebble or prettier shell).
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Lawrence Krauss is an admirer of Plato's cave analogy (or allegory). The occupants can only understand reality from what they observe. Whatever is outside is hidden from view. There is always going to be an ocean of truth waiting to be discovered. In our case, the deeper we look more wonders are likely to be known.
    What is a universe and why should it exist at all? Can't answer this at the moment and it probably requires a new mathematics (smoother pebble or prettier shell).
    It sounds like Plato is saying that what we learn is limited by the constraints of our senses, current knowledge, and reasoning, and as we begin learning and reasoning we discover an endless ocean of knowledge sitting before us waiting to be explored.
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