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Thread: What is your word of the day?

  1. #1 What is your word of the day? 
    ...matter and pixie dust wegs's Avatar
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    This is on the other science forum, so why not here?

    My word of the day is slake - to quench or satisfy

    I love this new word, googled ''word of the day'' and this came up. I'll have to work it into a conversation.


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  3. #2  
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    My word of the day is obfuscate, because you have bewildered me with this.


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    Forum Masters Degree mmatt9876's Avatar
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    My word of the day is onomatopoeia - the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named.
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    I'll give you three: yclept, barriolage and glode.
    The first means "by the name of" (as in "Today I met an old friend yclept Stewart").
    The second originally meant "motley - mixture of colours" and is/ was most used as a musical term (of all things) but more recently the French use it mean a camouflage paint scheme. The broader term "camouflage" (in French military parlance) refers to the "extras" like cammo netting etc.
    The third I discovered a couple of days ago while reading Vince Flynn's Mitch Rapp series of books 1 where the author persists in using the word "weaved". My first thought was "WTF happened to "wove"?". On checking those two words have different derivations and are not interchangeable. That lead to other Old English-derived past participles and the revelation that glode is the past tense of glide. ("He glode the plane in to a deadstick landing").


    1 If you're thinking of going to see American Assassin my advice is wait until you can get it cheap or for free on a TV channel. The book (while not exactly wonderful) is far better and has a considerably less ridiculous finale.
    2 Turns out that "weaved" was the correct word in this instance, but... hey ho3.
    3 Still doesn't excuse the somewhat grating US preference for "shined" over "shone".
    Last edited by Dywyddyr; October 9th, 2017 at 08:36 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    I'll give you three: yclept, barriolage and glode.
    The first means "by the name of" (as in "Today I met a an old friend yclept Stewart").
    The second originally meant "motley - mixture of colours" and is/ was most used as a musical term (of all things) but more recently the French use it mean a camouflage paint scheme. The broader term "camouflage" (in French military parlance) refers to the "extras" like cammo netting etc.
    The third I discovered a couple of days ago while reading Vince Flynn's Mitch Rapp series of books 1 where the author persists in using the word "weaved". My first thought was "WTF happened to "wove"?". On checking those two words have different derivations and are not interchangeable. That lead to other Old English -derived past participles and the revelation that glode is the past tense of glide. (He glode the plane in to a deadstick landing").


    1 If you're thinking of going to see American Assassin my advice is wait until you can get it cheap or for free on a TV channel. The book (while not exactly wonderful) is far better and a has a considerably less ridiculous finale.
    2 Turns out that "weaved" was the correct word in this instance, but... hey ho3.

    3 Still doesn't excuse the somewhat grating US preference for "shined" over "shone".

    Very good. Keep them coming.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    My word of the day is onomatopoeia - the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named.
    Think that is from onoma (name) and poein (to make)-which also gives us "a poem"
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  8. #7  
    ...matter and pixie dust wegs's Avatar
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    There's still no like feature here?

    word of the day -

    anthropocentric
    • viewing and interpreting everything in terms of human experience and values.
    • regarding the human being as the central fact of the universe.
    • assuming human beings to be the final aim and end of the universe.


    We don't know anyone like this, do we?

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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by wegs View Post
    There's still no like feature here?

    word of the day -

    anthropocentric
    • viewing and interpreting everything in terms of human experience and values.
    • regarding the human being as the central fact of the universe.
    • assuming human beings to be the final aim and end of the universe.


    We don't know anyone like this, do we?

    I tend toward misanthropy - it's a far more reliable stance...

    And another1 (possibly my favourite word): concinnity - the skilful and harmonious arrangement or fitting together of the different parts of something, studied elegance of literary or artistic style.
    I first came across this one through reading Neal Stephenson; yclept, if you're interested, was from Roger Zelazny's books, bariolage2 was from a (French language) technical history of the Renault/ GIAT VAB.

    1 Also not recognised by spell checkers.
    2 The number of "r"s appears to vary with writer!
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  10. #9  
    ...matter and pixie dust wegs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by wegs View Post
    There's still no like feature here?

    word of the day -

    anthropocentric
    • viewing and interpreting everything in terms of human experience and values.
    • regarding the human being as the central fact of the universe.
    • assuming human beings to be the final aim and end of the universe.


    We don't know anyone like this, do we?

    I tend toward misanthropy - it's a far more reliable stance...

    And another1 (possibly my favourite word): concinnity - the skilful and harmonious arrangement or fitting together of the different parts of something, studied elegance of literary or artistic style.
    I first came across this one through reading Neal Stephenson; yclept, if you're interested, was from Roger Zelazny's books, bariolage2 was from a (French language) technical history of the Renault/ GIAT VAB.

    1 Also not recognised by spell checkers.
    2 The number of "r"s appears to vary with writer!
    It's actually a lovely word, I like how it sounds. Do you find yourself using this word with others? Some words astound me but they never seem to make it to regular conversations.
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    My word of the day is onomatopoeia - the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named.
    Think that is from onoma (name) and poein (to make)-which also gives us "a poem"
    I believe you are right except for one thing, the Late Latin, originally Greek, word that means "to make" in English and is part of my word of the day is actually written "poiein".
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by wegs View Post
    It's actually a lovely word, I like how it sounds. Do you find yourself using this word with others? Some words astound me but they never seem to make it to regular conversations.
    Assuming you mean "concinnity" , then yes.
    I used it several times (straight after learning it) during architecture class and completely lost everyone until I explained it.
    (I even fitted it into a poem I wrote...)
    Contrariwise I've only ever (so far) used "yclept" in my writing but managed to get away with "bariolage" in conversation (just to be "snooty" while discussing military vehicle camouflage schemes1).
    Bricolage is another good one, and should see far more use than it actually gets.

    1 Far more involved - and constrained - than most people would suspect.
    Last edited by Dywyddyr; October 8th, 2017 at 06:58 PM.
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    [QUOTE=mmatt9876;608102]
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post

    I believe you are right except for one thing, the Late Latin, originally Greek, word that means "to make" in English and is part of my word of the day is actually written "poiein".
    Yes ,I am extremely rusty and I did misspell it. But it is Greek ,not Latin. "Onoma" is also Greek.(unless I have completely lost my Elgin Marbles.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by wegs View Post
    It's actually a lovely word, I like how it sounds. Do you find yourself using this word with others? Some words astound me but they never seem to make it to regular conversations.
    Assuming you mean "concinnity" , then yes.
    I used it several times (straight after learning it) during architecture class and completely lost everyone until I explained it.
    (I even fitted it into a poem I wrote...)
    Likewise I've only ever used "yclept" in my writing but managed to get away with "bariolage" in conversation (just to be "snooty" while discussing military vehicle camouflage schemes1).
    Bricolage is another good one, and should see far more use than it actually gets.

    1 Far more involved - and constrained - than most people would suspect.
    "concinnity" sounds a bit porno** from where I am sitting. Have you considered sponsorship for your insertion of these unusual words into the public arena?

    **a bit Venus de Milo
    https://media1.shmoop.com/images/myt...otticelli.jpeg (more of a scallop shell than a conch ,admittedly)

    EDIT: "Cicciolina" might have been on my mind perhaps:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilona_Staller
    Last edited by geordief; October 9th, 2017 at 07:47 AM.
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  15. #14  
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    Ostrobogulous.

    Bizarre, interesting, unusual, slightly indecent.








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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Shotgun blast: if you like unusual words then read Stephen R. Donaldson's Chronicles of Thomas Covenant1.
    Chlamys - anyone with an interest in ancient history should know this.
    Chary - actually (in the UK) it's not that obscure2.
    Catenulated - a bit of thought may give you this one, especially if of an engineering or mathematical bent.
    Condign.
    Surquedry.
    Cymar.
    Jerrid.
    Extirpate.
    Telic.
    Roynish.

    1 I'll tell you in advance: the first half-dozen or so chapters are very slow-going and "difficult" to get through. The "hero" is an author (from our world) who contracts leprosy. The book(s) not only pick up considerably once he's "moved" to the "fantasy world" but the world-building is phenomenal. IMO it rivals (not copies, not rips off, not "mimics") Tolkien. Spoiler: the second trilogy almost made me cry - he virtually destroys the world he built up in the first one.
    2 "Location" matters with regard to unusual words: on the "other" science forum someone posted a vocabulary test and numerous posters were accused of cheating when they gave their scores. Turns out that, in the USA, "brougham" and "tyro" (among others) are virtually unknown while a link to back issues (only for 5-10 years or so) showed that The Times3 had used each (without having to explain their meaning) freely if not regularly.
    3 That's THE Times, not the New York Times.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Chlamys - anyone with an interest in ancient history should know this.
    .
    Can't get away from the sexual references...It gave us "chlamydia" I see.
    Sounds like "condign" may be more used in the States than here but I am probably wrong.
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post

    I believe you are right except for one thing, the Late Latin, originally Greek, word that means "to make" in English and is part of my word of the day is actually written "poiein".
    Yes ,I am extremely rusty and I did misspell it. But it is Greek ,not Latin. "Onoma" is also Greek.(unless I have completely lost my Elgin Marbles.)
    I made a mistake. Onomatopoeia came into the English language via Late Latin and its constituents "onoma" and "poiein" are indeed Greek.
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    My word of the day is obfuscate, because you have bewildered me with this.
    Your word makes me think of the Pink Floyd Album 1972 Obfusc\Ation!
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  20. #19  
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    Ominous - giving the impression something bad or unpleasant is going to happen; threatening; inauspicious.
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by wegs View Post
    It's actually a lovely word, I like how it sounds. Do you find yourself using this word with others? Some words astound me but they never seem to make it to regular conversations.
    Assuming you mean "concinnity" , then yes.
    I used it several times (straight after learning it) during architecture class and completely lost everyone until I explained it.
    (I even fitted it into a poem I wrote...)
    Likewise I've only ever used "yclept" in my writing but managed to get away with "bariolage" in conversation (just to be "snooty" while discussing military vehicle camouflage schemes1).
    Bricolage is another good one, and should see far more use than it actually gets.

    1 Far more involved - and constrained - than most people would suspect.
    "concinnity" sounds a bit porno** from where I am sitting. Have you considered sponsorship for your insertion of these unusual words into the public arena?

    **a bit Venus de Milo
    https://media1.shmoop.com/images/myt...otticelli.jpeg (more of a scallop shell than a conch ,admittedly)

    EDIT: "Cicciolina" might have been on my mind perhaps:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilona_Staller
    Concinnity sounds like a porn word? lol I'm worried about you, now.
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  22. #21  
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    My word of the day -

    Denegation - meaning, denial

    I could see using this word, it seems like a word that could be used in regular speech with ease.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wegs View Post
    My word of the day -

    Denegation - meaning, denial

    I could see using this word, it seems like a word that could be used in regular speech with ease.
    It seems like "negation" is a big part of your word.
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    "gullible " seemingly derived from the gullet so ,anyone who swallows something easily perhaps -even Corporations .....
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    Arrogate (not to be confused with, although related to, arrogant) - to take or claim (usually without justification) for oneself.
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    Phenolphthalein, an indicator none of my students seem to be able to spell correctly! Although they all know it's effects if you ingest it. (I think my wording in the safety brief was don't get it on your skin or anywhere near your mouth or nose or you might shit yourself!
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    Sciamachy....a fight with an imaginary enemy
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Sciamachy....a fight with an imaginary enemy
    That makes it sound somewhat more delusional than it really (usually) is.
    Skia = shadow, makhia = fighting.
    So it applies to shadow boxing (something, mutatis mutandis, all martial artists do at some point in the learning process) as well as things like the war on terror (combat against shadows = i.e. we can't identify the enemy, thus they're shades/ shaded).
    Possibly also fighting IN the shadows ("ancient teachers taught in shaded public places such as porches and groves") = covert ops.
    Last edited by Dywyddyr; October 11th, 2017 at 10:54 PM.
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    Sanguine - Positivity or optimism in the face of adversity. It comes from the route of the word for blood, this being traditionally associated with courage.
    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. - confucius
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    Wasn't blood one of the elements supposed to make up the body in mediaeval medicine?

    Another was phlegm and so you had phlegmatic characters and sanguine characters -as well as others surely that I don't know.
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  31. #30  
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    Sanguine is a contronym. It can mean peaceful or bloodthirsty, which is bloody confusing.

    https://www.dailywritingtips.com/75-...tory-meanings/
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Sanguine is a contronym. It can mean peaceful or bloodthirsty, which is bloody confusing.

    https://www.dailywritingtips.com/75-...tory-meanings/
    contranym is a new word for me. Yes "sanguine" always confused me for that reason.
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  33. #32  
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    Just suppose you are a speaker of a foreign tongue who is learning English. Not only do you have to learn the contronyms but also the phrasal verbs, where putting a preposition after a verb (normally it goes in front of a noun) completely changes the meaning.

    An Extensive List of Phrasal Verbs | Common Phrasal Verbs

    If I say I'm fed up, it doesn't mean my stomach is full.
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  34. #33  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Sciamachy....a fight with an imaginary enemy
    That makes it sound somewhat more delusional than it really (usually) is.
    Skia = shadow, makhia = fighting.
    So it applies to shadow boxing (something, mutatis mutandis, all martial artists do at some point in the learning process) as well as things like the war on terror (combat against shadows = i.e. we can't identify the enemy, thus they're shades/ shaded).
    Possibly also fighting IN the shadows ("ancient teachers taught in shaded public places such as porches and groves") = covert ops.
    Yes, fighting the shadows is definitely included. Also a psychotic episode in some cases, at least I think I've read that somewhere.

    Ascended: Sanguine is one of my favorite words for some reason. I particularly like it when it has the prefix con attached to it because those three letters signify a warning of sorts. I think that not only is the warning ignored but the word consanguinity is not spoken in Kentucky

    My word for today is: codswallop, meaning nonsense or rubbish. I've used it here a few times.

    I think I got this from Wiktionary re origins: n. said to be from 19c. (but first attested 1963), perhaps from wallop, Britishslang for "beer," and cod in one of its various senses, perhaps "testicles."

    Have to ask: what do they call beer nuts in the Kingdom of UK?
    Last edited by zinjanthropos; October 12th, 2017 at 10:49 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Wasn't blood one of the elements supposed to make up the body in mediaeval medicine?

    Another was phlegm and so you had phlegmatic characters and sanguine characters -as well as others surely that I don't know.
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Wasn't blood one of the elements supposed to make up the body in mediaeval medicine?

    Another was phlegm and so you had phlegmatic characters and sanguine characters -as well as others surely that I don't know.

    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Just suppose you are a speaker of a foreign tongue who is learning English. Not only do you have to learn the contronyms but also the phrasal verbs, where putting a preposition after a verb (normally it goes in front of a noun) completely changes the meaning.

    An Extensive List of Phrasal Verbs | Common Phrasal Verbs

    If I say I'm fed up, it doesn't mean my stomach is full.
    geordief +1 like, ox + 1 like

    Cheers guys, fascinating! I've never heard of any of that before, not even "contronyms".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    geordief +1 like, ox + 1 like

    Cheers guys, fascinating! I've never heard of any of that before, not even "contronyms".
    Greek ,not mediaeval with a bit of digging

    Greek Medicine: THE FOUR HUMORS
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Sanguine is a contronym. It can mean peaceful or bloodthirsty, which is bloody confusing.

    https://www.dailywritingtips.com/75-...tory-meanings/
    contranym is a new word for me. Yes "sanguine" always confused me for that reason.
    "Enervated" is going/ has gone that way. While it actually means "feeling drained of energy" some writers use it to mean "re-energised".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    "Enervated" is going/ has gone that way. While it actually means "feeling drained of energy" some writers use it to mean "re-energised".
    Stop the leximobile ,I want to get off
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  39. #38  
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    Forebode - an act of warning of something bad about to occur

    I've often heard people misuse this word thinking it is the past tense of forbid, but that is forbade.
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    And you can also say "bodes well".
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  41. #40  
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    Enormity and plethora are examples of commonly misused words.

    Enormity doesn't mean big, it means wicked.
    'The enormity of the task ahead' should read 'The enormousness (or magnitude or immensity) of the task ahead.

    Plethora doesn't mean abundant, it means excess. 'There is a plethora of books in the library.'

    A malapropism (from a character by Sheriden) or Dogberryism (after a Shakespearian character) are used to describe words misused in a sentence.
    All the better if they are fun. 'The electric register of voters.'
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    Enormity and plethora are examples of commonly misused words.

    Enormity doesn't mean big, it means wicked.
    But the use of enormity to mean "big" dates back over 200 years, so it's fairly understandable that it does get used in that sense: Sense of "hugeness" (1765 in English) is etymological but to prevent misunderstanding probably best avoided in favor of enormousness, though this, too, originally meant "immeasurable wickedness" (1718) and didn't start to mean "hugeness" until c. 1800.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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    And "wicked" doesn't mean "really bad" ; it means" really good" init?
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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    And "wicked" doesn't mean "really bad" ; it means" really good" init?
    *Slap*.
    (Because of the like button not working).
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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  45. #44  
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    "Contemporaneous" is my word today.
    Also, I have to say I never heard of "redact/redacted" until very recently.
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    My word is "got". Just to share the direction we got from our teacher in Primary school in the 50s.

    He told us not to use words like "got" because they were too Germanic (all that gutterality) and we did not want to be adopting their linguistic mannerisms.

    I don't hold it against him.It was fairly close to the war and he seemed a decent skin
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    Dystopian - relating to or denoting an imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degrading one.
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    'Procrastinating'

    I am keeping busy indoors tending the fire, cooking and baking until the afternoon temps are at their warmest before heading out to do equine sanitation and install the water tank heaters.

    Ice cream made, bell peppers roasted and peeled and bread is baking so at least I am procrastinating productively.
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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    'Procrastinating'
    I thought about posting that word last week but never got round to it....
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    'Procrastinating'
    I thought about posting that word last week but never got round to it....
    You were just thinking about it.

    I am actually doing it, lol.
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  51. #50  
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    Intrapersonal -

    Intrapersonal communication is a communicator's internal use of language or thought. It can be useful to envision intrapersonal communication occurring in the mind of the individual in a model which contains a sender, receiver, and feedback loop.

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    Polymorphism - the condition of occurring in several different forms.
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    Metempsychosis - shifting the soul/ psyche into a different body.
    Psychopomp - an entity that escorts newly-departed souls to the afterlife. Best known example here.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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  54. #53  
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    It is beyond the call of duty to mention this word.

    Supererogatory.

    http://www.dictionary.com/browse/supererogatory

    So superfluous, I just spelt it wrong.
    Last edited by ox; October 18th, 2017 at 11:30 AM.
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    eg "Thou shalt not kill; but needst not strive officiously to keep alive" ?

    "officiously" is a good word too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Dystopian - relating to or denoting an imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degrading one.
    Interesting word!
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  57. #56  
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    Best dystopian novels I've read:

    1984 - George Orwell.
    The Time Machine - HG Wells.
    The Road - Cormac McCarthy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cameron buttle View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Dystopian - relating to or denoting an imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degrading one.
    Interesting word!
    Thanks! Dystopian is the antonym of utopian.
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    Ethereal - extremely delicate and light in a way that seems too perfect for this world.
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    Anatidaephobia - The fear that somewhere, somehow a duck is watching you...
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Anatidaephobia - The fear that somewhere, somehow a duck is watching you...
    whodathunkit?
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    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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  63. #62  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Anatidaephobia
    While we're on the names of phobias, how about:

    hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia - the fear of the number 666.
    There are no paradoxes in relativity, just people's misunderstandings of it.
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  64. #63  
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    Number of the beast is 616.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/616_(number)
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    You have given me GOOSEbumps with your photo Dywyddyr!
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    That is a bit smutty(probably unnatural) ,but we will let it pass
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    That is a bit smutty(probably unnatural) ,but we will let it pass
    Do you mean my joke was smutty? If so I did not intend to be rude. I was just making a play on words joke.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    That is a bit smutty(probably unnatural) ,but we will let it pass
    Do you mean my joke was smutty? If so I did not intend to be rude. I was just making a play on words joke.
    Well goose on duck is frowned upon in some quarters
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Well goose on duck is frowned upon in some quarters
    This duck has been goosed several times in his life!
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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    struthious This adjective is a zoological one that means “ostrich-like,” but it shows up occasionally in less-technical sources to specifically refer to the avoidance tactic we associate with ostriches: sticking one’s head in the sand. (Ostriches, for the record, don’t do this: they lie flat on the ground to avoid detection.) Decry someone’s struthious attitude when you want to avoid saying outright that they are avoiding something.

    I am being struthius about getting started this day. Time to hie me hither and feed my ponies before I indulge in a morning tea. A day off and I am feeling slothful.
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  71. #70  
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    Strewth.
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    Xylophone,

    I was the quizmaster at a pub quiz and was surprised how many people didn't know the literal translation of this was "wooden sound"...

    Although they all got Volkswagon as meaning "peoples car"...

    More people should do classical languages at school!
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  73. #72  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mmatt9876 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    That is a bit smutty(probably unnatural) ,but we will let it pass
    Do you mean my joke was smutty? If so I did not intend to be rude. I was just making a play on words joke.
    Well goose on duck is frowned upon in some quarters
    I assure you that is not what I meant. Funny though!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Well goose on duck is frowned upon in some quarters
    This duck has been goosed several times in his life!
    I did not mean that either. Also funny!
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    oleaginous - Someone who is sickeningly ingratiating, ( “a brownnoser” ). The word first meant “oily” when it came into English and derives ultimately from the Greek word for an olive tree. May be applied liberally to anyone who uses flattery for social or corporate lubrication.

    One encounters much more of these sorts during election time when all are seeking endorsement.
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  75. #74  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    oleaginous - Someone who is sickeningly ingratiating, ( “a brownnoser” ). The word first meant “oily” when it came into English and derives ultimately from the Greek word for an olive tree. May be applied liberally to anyone who uses flattery for social or corporate lubrication.

    One encounters much more of these sorts during election time when all are seeking endorsement.
    Nice word but smarmy is earthier and more immediately understood (as I am sure you'll agree )
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  76. #75  
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    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    oleaginous - Someone who is sickeningly ingratiating, ( “a brownnoser” ). The word first meant “oily” when it came into English and derives ultimately from the Greek word for an olive tree. May be applied liberally to anyone who uses flattery for social or corporate lubrication.

    One encounters much more of these sorts during election time when all are seeking endorsement.
    Nice word but smarmy is earthier and more immediately understood (as I am sure you'll agree )
    Agreed but it can be somewhat entertaining to incorporate vocabulary that leaves them perplexed until I have 'left the building'.
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    There is that other word (well, expression) esprit de l'escalier which can come in handy for smarmy b***ds
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    temerarious
    as in "rash and temerarious youth" applied by Queen Lizz 1 to her close advisor the Earl of Essex

    The Essex Rebellion, Elizabethan treason
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    My wife and I went out for breakfast this morning. There's a little restaurant we like in Chippawa, a small village that's been incorporated into the city of Niagara Falls. (Chippawa was once also the home of a young James Cameron of Titanic and Avatar movie fame). The restaurant contains nostalgia, especially photos, from the village's early days. Saw a poster there today dated 1922 and it contained a word I personally had never seen or heard of before. So I looked it up....

    Calathumpian: (From Wiki) also spelled "callothumpian", "carathumpian" and "calisthumpian", is a term that is used in a non-judgmental way to describe a religion or philosophy in its infancy. The description is of a relatively original belief, held by a small group, personally assembled, or not institutionalized. It can also be sometimes used as a non-specific example of a religious or political persuasion.

    The poster, amongst other things listed on it, was promoting a Calathumpian Race (whatever that is) to be held at some festive event.
    Last edited by zinjanthropos; November 2nd, 2017 at 12:17 PM.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    duplicate post
    Last edited by zinjanthropos; November 2nd, 2017 at 12:16 PM.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
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    Interesting concept that Calathumpian

    My word of the day is "inappropriate".(definition not supplied )
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  82. #81  
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    Sting is my word of the day.

    I've been thinking of all the different uses of this word, for example - if you hit your elbow, it might sting, but if you get sand in your eye, that too may sting. Two very different feelings ...two very different experiences of pain...but the word ''sting'' seems to fit for both.
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  83. #82  
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    apposite



    suitable; well-adapted; pertinent; relevant; apt:


    "an apposite answer"
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