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Thread: Future of the universe

  1. #1 Future of the universe 
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    Is the universe heading towards a big freeze,a big rip,a big crunch,or a big bounce,or is it part of an indefinitely recurring cyclic model.


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    Quote Originally Posted by wikipedia
    The number has received considerable attention in popular culture as a result of its central appearance in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy as the "Answer to The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything".


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    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucky star View Post
    Is the universe heading towards a big freeze,a big rip,a big crunch,or a big bounce,or is it part of an indefinitely recurring cyclic model.
    Current thinking tends, I understand, towards a freeze, or rip. This thinking will likely change a time or two over the next couple of billion years or so. Check in later.
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    The Big Crunch

    In physical cosmology, the Big Crunch is one possible scenario for the ultimate fate of the universe, in which the metric expansion of space eventually reverses and the universe recollapses, ultimately ending as a black hole singularity or causing a reformation of the universe starting with another big bang. Sudden singularities and crunch or rip singularities at late times occur only for hypothetical matter with implausible physical properties.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    42

    Quote Originally Posted by wikipedia
    The number has received considerable attention in popular culture as a result of its central appearance in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy as the "Answer to The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything".
    This isn't funny. You give a flip answer to a serious question. The new member didn't deserve this. Are you trying to scare off new members? Way to go.

    @lucky star

    Rob is our resident troll and should be ignored. I apologize for his behavior.

    (BTW, a mod could move this science thread to a more deserving sub-forum.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chucknorium View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    42

    Quote Originally Posted by wikipedia
    The number has received considerable attention in popular culture as a result of its central appearance in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy as the "Answer to The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything".
    This isn't funny. You give a flip answer to a serious question. The new member didn't deserve this. Are you trying to scare off new members? Way to go.

    @lucky star

    Rob is our resident troll and should be ignored. I apologize for his behavior.

    (BTW, a mod could move this science thread to a more deserving sub-forum.)
    So do you think you can answer that question, what did John say something give us a couple of billion years we might have a better idea. Was his answer better?
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    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    So do you think you can answer that question, what did John say something give us a couple of billion years we might have a better idea. Was his answer better?
    Considerably better, for the following reasons:
    1. My full answer was informative and, within current understanding, accurate.
    2. The sub-text of my post was thoughtful and meaningful.
    3. I carefully designed both format (structure) and content of my post in order to provide maximum information and provocative thoughts with minimum words.
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    ~ Of this subject we can be speculative.. We can guess and extrapolate ideas of the Universes end..
    But., To do so with the best information as yet available.. is the intention of John Galts post..
    ~ He is as correct as current science lets us be, and I agree.. Well said.
    No trend of slowing of the observed expansion is found. So to imagine that the Universe will go on expanding into a eventual
    very sparsely populated void.. Where one can 'imagine' a sky with not a single star visible.. simply because of expansion ongoing.
    It's a image I can only imagine.. That we live in a time where we can see the local group of galaxies and all of this one..
    I find it hard to state with clarity a end. I only imagine a slow long drift towards a cold spars space that will still contain all that it does. Just no longer within lights range to reach us.. ( Can I be understood ?)
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    Quote Originally Posted by astromark View Post
    ~ Of this subject we can be speculative.. We can guess and extrapolate ideas of the Universes end..
    But., To do so with the best information as yet available.. is the intention of John Galts post..
    ~ He is as correct as current science lets us be, and I agree.. Well said.
    No trend of slowing of the observed expansion is found. So to imagine that the Universe will go on expanding into a eventual
    very sparsely populated void.. Where one can 'imagine' a sky with not a single star visible.. simply because of expansion ongoing.
    It's a image I can only imagine.. That we live in a time where we can see the local group of galaxies and all of this one..
    I find it hard to state with clarity a end. I only imagine a slow long drift towards a cold spars space that will still contain all that it does. Just no longer within lights range to reach us.. ( Can I be understood ?)
    I can imagine you writing that thinking how horrible it will be when there will not be a single star in the sky.
    I never thought it would be as bad as that. The Milky Way galaxy will stay together but the other galaxies will be separated and out of view.
    Did I understand that correctly?
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    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    I can imagine you writing that thinking how horrible it will be when there will not be a single star in the sky.
    I never thought it would be as bad as that. The Milky Way galaxy will stay together but the other galaxies will be separated and out of view.
    Did I understand that correctly?
    How can you imagine there will be any stars left?
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    I can imagine you writing that thinking how horrible it will be when there will not be a single star in the sky.
    I never thought it would be as bad as that. The Milky Way galaxy will stay together but the other galaxies will be separated and out of view.
    Did I understand that correctly?
    How can you imagine there will be any stars left?
    Your friend Astromark said "Where one can 'imagine' a sky with not a single star visible..".

    Gravity will hold the Milky Way galaxy together won't it? I don't imagine the stars will disappear altogether, they may stop glowing but they will still be there radiating heat just about forever won't they?
    "Forever" is rather a long time so the ultimate end is harder to imagine but we won't be here to see it, so does it really matter?

    What were you getting at John? I could be wrong but those were the thoughts I had on the topic years ago, maybe they need updating. Please tell me what do you imagine?
    Last edited by Robittybob1; September 27th, 2014 at 09:23 PM.
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    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post

    Gravity will hold the Milky Way galaxy together won't it? I don't imagine the stars will disappear altogether, they may stop glowing but they will still be there radiating heat just about forever won't they?
    "Forever" is rather a long time so the ultimate end is harder to imagine but we won't be here to see it, so does it really matter?
    Not if the Big Rip scenario is right. All gravitationally bound systems will be ultimately torn apart if the accelerated expansion rate continues unabated and ultimately even all forms of fundamental matter itself..........however as you know, what is flavour of the month today will change tomorrow.
    Last edited by Implicate Order; September 27th, 2014 at 11:09 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Implicate Order View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post

    Gravity will hold the Milky Way galaxy together won't it? I don't imagine the stars will disappear altogether, they may stop glowing but they will still be there radiating heat just about forever won't they?
    "Forever" is rather a long time so the ultimate end is harder to imagine but we won't be here to see it, so does it really matter?
    Not if the Big Rip scenario is right. All gravitationally bound systems will be ultimately torn apart if the accelerated expansion rate continues unabated and ultimaely even all forms of fundamental matter itself..........however as you know, what is flavour of the month today will change tomorrow.
    I have never studied that hypothesis, sorry.
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    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    I have never studied that hypothesis, sorry.
    Are you aware of the 1998 astrophysical discovery of accelerated expansion?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Implicate Order View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Robittybob1 View Post
    I have never studied that hypothesis, sorry.
    Are you aware of the 1998 astrophysical discovery of accelerated expansion?
    I was aware of Hubble's work on the expanding universe, and I have heard of Dark Energy but I haven't comprehended an accelerating expansion.
    The most widely accepted explanation for the accelerating expansion is the existence of dark energy, a substance with negative pressure which is spread homogeneously throughout the universe.
    Even with Hubble's discovery the further apart the galaxies were, the faster they were separating, wasn't it? That implies an acceleration, doesn't it?

    It isn't my field of interest so I'm relatively ignorant on these topics.
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    Forum Professor astromark's Avatar
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    Now home and with some time to revisit this for 'Bob'.. Yes The local group of Galaxies we call the 'Vergo' super cluster and now with
    The 'new' Hawaiian word.. for the Larger local group. ( and I can not recall it right now..) These things are gravity bound, but it is thought that at some future point that expansion will overcome the gravity forces.. The eventual drifting apart.. accelerating expansion is the stronger force.. None of that is speculative or guess work.. Tested and as best as can be confirmed as real..
    I used the word imagined when attempting to paint a scene I could see.. The concept is firm. How long will this take ?
    and that we ( humanity ) need not worry unduly.. we are talking of hundreds of billions of years.. Can we imagine billions of billions..
    but we should also understand that future discovery may change this future view..
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