Notices
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Why shouldn't we be eating insects

  1. #1 Why shouldn't we be eating insects 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3
    Should we all be eating insects instead of the normal meals we have. Insects have a lot more nutritional value than things like beef and pork. Most do the world is being took up by agriculture but we only need a small space to farm lots of insects and a lot of the world is in dire need of clean water but most of our water goes to animals for us to farm but if we farmed insects they would only need a small amount of water as insects can use the food they eat as water so these are the good things about them and it sure does look like we should be eating insects but are there any reasons we shouldn't be????


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Wa
    Posts
    2,299
    Social taboo for western countries in general. In other places certain insects are consumed. The general use of insects as a food source is most probably an inevitability of the near future. My main issue with eating bugs would simply be the hard crunchy shells, manageable with appropriate processing or choice of species. Maybe Paleo will come along and tell us what bug's he would eat (after I hear about using the term "bugs").


    I was some of the mud that got to sit up and look around.
    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
    -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.-
    Cat's Cradle.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4,138
    Quote Originally Posted by Conorwallace123 View Post
    ... Most do the world is being took up by agriculture but we only need a small space to farm lots of insects and a lot of the world is in dire need of clean water but most of our water goes to animals for us to farm but if we farmed insects they would only need a small amount of water as insects can use the food they eat as water ...
    Have you tried farming insects? Have you get an example of farming insects? I have seen maggots and flies in a compost heap but not much else in a farming situation. I think I could eat most insects but maggots and flies really don't appeal.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,444
    When I think of eating insects, I try to convince myself it's like eating shrimp, crab and lobster. No?
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    5,294
    Quote Originally Posted by GiantEvil View Post
    Social taboo for western countries in general. In other places certain insects are consumed. The general use of insects as a food source is most probably an inevitability of the near future. My main issue with eating bugs would simply be the hard crunchy shells, manageable with appropriate processing or choice of species. Maybe Paleo will come along and tell us what bug's he would eat (after I hear about using the term "bugs").
    I'm fine with bugs as a vernacular catch-all. haha

    If your not into lots of exoskeleton, you could go with the grubs from a number of larger wood boring beetles.
    Orthopterans are eaten in a large number of areas in the world and would only require an enclosed farm where the host crops are grown.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Sophomore jgoti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    199
    If well cooked, I don't have much trouble with munching the exoskeleton of shrimps and crayfish, except for the hard tail-ends that I leave at the side of the plate.

    There was a documentary (can't remember the name) in which some kids in the Amazon would roast and eat tarantulas as part of their normal diet. Most city-dwelling adults would piss their pants if they found one anywhere near their lawn.

    It's definately a cultural thing; if you can eat shrimps, you can eat insects. And if you like escargots, you shouldn't mind slugs either.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Quote Originally Posted by jgoti View Post
    ....And if you like escargots, you shouldn't mind slugs either.
    Slugs and snails can carry nematodes that can cause encephalitis.
    Angiostrongylus cantonensis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    So be sure to cook them well done. Too bad that makes them tough.

    Spiders taste nice.
    Spider - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    4,138
    Maybe we should all try something in the insect line and report back!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Wa
    Posts
    2,299
    Me and my buddy, when we were in elementary school, captured dozens of ants from the playground in two empty pill bottles. Then we poured Hershey's syrup on them and swigged the mess down. Chocolate covered ants!
    I was some of the mud that got to sit up and look around.
    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
    -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.-
    Cat's Cradle.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    In the maple woods here there is a large white grub that lives in dying maple trees. The trees are useless for lumber and are used mostly for firewood.
    When the trees are cut and split for firewood the grubs often fall out of the wood.
    It is quite a sweet tasting grub and some of the older wood splitters will gather them in a tin and eat them.

    I am not sure about farming insects or bugs. I have only known a few people doing anything like that and they were just raising mealworms for fishing bait.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    27.4679 S, 153.0278 E
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    In the maple woods here there is a large white grub that lives in dying maple trees. The trees are useless for lumber and are used mostly for firewood.
    When the trees are cut and split for firewood the grubs often fall out of the wood.
    It is quite a sweet tasting grub and some of the older wood splitters will gather them in a tin and eat them.

    I am not sure about farming insects or bugs. I have only known a few people doing anything like that and they were just raising mealworms for fishing bait.
    Good bush tucker. We have a number of wood-eating larvae termed here in Australia 'witchetty grubs' that when pan fried in butter and garlic make for a tasty treat.....well perhaps I am overstating things a bit.......well a lot....but when you are so hungry you could eat the crotch out of a low flying duck (you didn't hear this Dywyddyr), they serve as a delicacy. Less chewwy than koalas /tic :-))
    Last edited by Implicate Order; September 2nd, 2014 at 09:15 PM.
    Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Sophomore jgoti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jgoti View Post
    ....And if you like escargots, you shouldn't mind slugs either.
    Slugs and snails can carry nematodes that can cause encephalitis.
    Angiostrongylus cantonensis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    So be sure to cook them well done. Too bad that makes them tough.

    Spiders taste nice.
    Spider - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Boiling them is the common way of getting rid of anything dangerous. They didn't seem tough to me when I tried them, though. I mean escargots, not bugs.

    Have you tried spiders? They look really crispy in the picture.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Quote Originally Posted by jgoti View Post
    Have you tried spiders? They look really crispy in the picture.
    Yes, once. I fried a few of the local garden spiders to see what they tasted like. I only ate the abdomens. They were OK once I got past the squeamishness of them being spiders and they tasted kind of like chick peas.
    I couldn't imagine raising them for food though because the economics of such an operation seem wrong. Too much expense for the return.

    The maple grubs taste much better, but again the effort to collect them would rule them out commercially so the only people who even see them are the guys splitting firewood.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Sophomore jgoti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    199
    Chick peas? Who would have thought...
    I'm intrigued by the possibility. Last month we had to collect honey quite early because of this invasion of wasps we have in Europe. I could have given some of the bee larvae a try before the wasps got at them as it was mostly larvae and not much else.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Malignant Pimple shlunka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dogbox in front of Dywyddyr's house.
    Posts
    1,785
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    In the maple woods here there is a large white grub that lives in dying maple trees. The trees are useless for lumber and are used mostly for firewood.
    When the trees are cut and split for firewood the grubs often fall out of the wood.
    It is quite a sweet tasting grub and some of the older wood splitters will gather them in a tin and eat them.

    I am not sure about farming insects or bugs. I have only known a few people doing anything like that and they were just raising mealworms for fishing bait.
    My aunt "farms?" crickets for her many reptilian pets. Cheap to feed, cheap to accommodate, though I haven't tried one...
    "MODERATOR NOTE : We don't entertain trolls here, not even in the trash can. Banned." -Markus Hanke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,444
    My question is, when I (or my windshield/windscreen) squash(es) a bug, its innards look like "gunk". How does that cook up? Sheeesh, as if I really want to know! (I'm trying to hold onto the "just like shrimp" fantasy.)
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    5,294
    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe View Post
    My question is, when I (or my windshield/windscreen) squash(es) a bug, its innards look like "gunk". How does that cook up? Sheeesh, as if I really want to know! (I'm trying to hold onto the "just like shrimp" fantasy.)
    Roasting, deepfrying, battering and baking.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    ....
    I am not sure about farming insects or bugs. I have only known a few people doing anything like that and they were just raising mealworms for fishing bait.
    My aunt "farms?" crickets for her many reptilian pets. Cheap to feed, cheap to accommodate, though I haven't tried one...[/QUOTE]

    http://www.insectsarefood.com/recipes.html
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Would you tell me why I shouldn't use number2?
    By nima_persian in forum Education
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: April 23rd, 2014, 05:25 AM
  2. Maybe I Shouldn't Tell About This
    By jocular in forum Health & Medicine
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: September 3rd, 2013, 10:48 PM
  3. Shouldn't Still Exist
    By floor13avenger in forum Art and Culture
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 8th, 2010, 01:51 AM
  4. Spontaneous insects
    By CurrySonic in forum Biology
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: August 13th, 2008, 06:40 AM
  5. Shouldn't we all be agnostics ?
    By Cat1981(England) in forum Scientific Study of Religion
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: June 15th, 2007, 11:26 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •