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Thread: many of which

  1. #1 many of which 
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    Original: -ant also occurs in adjectives, many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English.


    Would you please tell me if I have properly rephrased the above sentence? and what does many refer to?

    -ant also occurs in adjectives many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English.



    In addition, would you possibly write the bold part in another form?

    -ant also occurs in adjectives, many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English.


    Thanks in advance


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  3. #2  
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    ant also occurs in adjectives, of which many are formed from stems which are not current words in English.

    is also possible.

    Examples might be "brilliant" "arrogant"


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  4. #3  
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    I really do appreciate your replies.

    And, could you tell me if we can rewrite the bold part by the word whose?


    And, why is the sentence that geordief has written brilliant?
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  5. #4  
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    "ant " is an ending to "brilli" .Briller is a French word meaning to shine .

    Brilliant in English means - well I am sure you know what it means.

    Give me your complete sentence which contains "whose" and I will tell you if it is correct.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by nima_persian View Post
    Original: -ant also occurs in adjectives, many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English.


    Would you please tell me if I have properly rephrased the above sentence? and what does many refer to?

    -ant also occurs in adjectives many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English.
    I don't see that you have rephrased the sentence, except that you omitted a comma.

    In addition, would you possibly write the bold part in another form?

    -ant also occurs in adjectives, many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English.


    Thanks in advance
    The suffix -ant occurs in adjectives. Many adjectives containing the suffix -ant are formed from words which are not current words in English.

    I really do appreciate your replies.

    And, could you tell me if we can rewrite the bold part by the word whose?
    Is this what you mean?
    Original: "-ant also occurs in adjectives, many of which are formed from stems which are not current words in English."
    Revised: "-ant also occurs in many adjectives whose stems are not current words in English."

    And, why is the sentence that geordief has written brilliant?
    Geordief used the word "brilliant" as an example of an adjective with the suffix -ant. The root of this word, "brill" is not a current word in English. It is derived from French and Italian words which mean "to shine."
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  7. #6  
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    thanks Harold .You have a less cluttered mind than I do .
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  8. #7  
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    You cannot use "of which" to precede the object of possession. So they're not interchangeable.
    It was a war the effect of which still continues.
    It was a war whose effect still continues.
    You cannot say
    "It was a war of which effect => wrong"
    Would you please tell me whether or not these are correct explanations? if so, I cannot get them, especially the italic parts.

    I have collected these explanations from a site.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by nima_persian View Post
    You cannot use "of which" to precede the object of possession. So they're not interchangeable.
    It was a war the effect of which still continues.
    It was a war whose effect still continues.
    You cannot say
    "It was a war of which effect => wrong"
    Would you please tell me whether or not these are correct explanations? if so, I cannot get them, especially the italic parts.

    I have collected these explanations from a site.
    I agree with the site you got this from. The object of possession is "effect" because the effect belongs to the war, so you cannot put "of which" in front of effect.
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