Notices
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Electrical costs.

  1. #1 Electrical costs. 
    Forum Junior Bettina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    264
    I'm trying to save electricity and ease our electric costs. We pay 18.8 cents a KWH and our last bill was $180 (a month.)

    I'm starting to change our bulbs over to CFL's and my dad is writing down all the amps and wattages of the other appliances for me. My question is how do I find out what the clothes dryer actually uses. He says it uses 23 amperes but I don't think it uses that all the time. I know it has a thermostat.

    Any clever way of finding out what it actually uses for power?

    Bee


    Emotionally based life form. The Fword will get you on my ignore list.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman pseudoscientist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    41
    I am writing this pointless sentence to see if you have put me on your ignore list or what, and if you'd temporarily unblock me just in case my post contained the answer to your question.

    Aah, life is good.



    </test>


    "Let's all be friends!" -- Barney (the dinosaur)
    http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u...coexistkf4.jpg

    I'm ashamed of your public display of ignorance.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: Electrical costs. 
    Forum Senior anand_kapadia's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    India
    Posts
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Bettina
    I'm trying to save electricity and ease our electric costs. We pay 18.8 cents a KWH and our last bill was $180 (a month.)

    I'm starting to change our bulbs over to CFL's and my dad is writing down all the amps and wattages of the other appliances for me. My question is how do I find out what the clothes dryer actually uses. He says it uses 23 amperes but I don't think it uses that all the time. I know it has a thermostat.

    Any clever way of finding out what it actually uses for power?

    Bee
    Do you want to reduce your electric bill. Think in some other you can conserve electricity and thus non-renewable resources.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Guest
    There are plenty of 'clever ways' to find out, sadly It is unlikely you will have the 'clever equipment' 23amps at 110Volts = 2.5Kwatt. You could listen to it ticking on and off and work out how much time it's on.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Junior Bettina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    264
    Quote Originally Posted by anand_kapadia
    Do you want to reduce your electric bill. Think in some other you can conserve electricity and thus non-renewable resources.
    I'm trying..


    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    There are plenty of 'clever ways' to find out, sadly It is unlikely you will have the 'clever equipment' 23amps at 110Volts = 2.5Kwatt. You could listen to it ticking on and off and work out how much time it's on.
    My friend is going to help me by clamping on a chart recorder. I'm not familiar with that but I really want to know about that dryer.

    Bettina
    Emotionally based life form. The Fword will get you on my ignore list.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Guest
    The chart recorder will merely record the current or 'on time' of the thermostat, I suspect he will clamp a current sensor around the cable to do this. what it will show is a line which will merely move between two levels, you then work out the ratio of these levels and divide into the maximum current to get the average. So if your dryer is 2KW and on for 25% of the time then the average power will be 500Watts. if you pay 10 cents a killowatt hour then the running cost of your dryer will be 5 cents per hour for every hour you have it switched on.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Junior Bettina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    264
    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    The chart recorder will merely record the current or 'on time' of the thermostat, I suspect he will clamp a current sensor around the cable to do this. what it will show is a line which will merely move between two levels, you then work out the ratio of these levels and divide into the maximum current to get the average. So if your dryer is 2KW and on for 25% of the time then the average power will be 500Watts. if you pay 10 cents a killowatt hour then the running cost of your dryer will be 5 cents per hour for every hour you have it switched on.
    Well, the chart recorder didn't work out. According to the manual we had to connect the clamp meter across just one of the ac lines not the whole cord but we can't do that without making something.

    However, my dad kicked us out because he doesn't want us to mess around with 220V so we have to think of something else. I know the voltage (220) and the amperage (23 amps). I could just sit there and watch the panel light dim when the heater goes on but thats too boring and long. I need another way and I'm not giving up.

    Bee
    Emotionally based life form. The Fword will get you on my ignore list.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Guest
    OK here is another way, (when dad is out!) turn everything in the house off, read the electric meter as accurately as you can, turn the dryer on for 1 or 2 hours then at the end read the meter again, subtract start reading from end reading and divide by the number of hours, now multiply by 1000 for the number of watts used. The longer you do this test for the more accurate will be the result.

    Are you in the US? if so your supply voltage should be 110 not 220V. 220V is mostly europe (& Canada?) UK is 240V.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Senior
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    OK here is another way, (when dad is out!) turn everything in the house off, read the electric meter as accurately as you can, turn the dryer on for 1 or 2 hours then at the end read the meter again, subtract start reading from end reading and divide by the number of hours, now multiply by 1000 for the number of watts used. The longer you do this test for the more accurate will be the result.

    Are you in the US? if so your supply voltage should be 110 not 220V. 220V is mostly europe (& Canada?) UK is 240V.
    quite wrong. they have newly upped the voltage by 10 in both america and canada see chart: http://www.kropla.com/electric2.htm
    I don't suffer from insanity, i enjoy every minute of it

    the road to succes is never paved or clearly marked
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Guest
    No, not quite wrong, slightly out maybe, I suspect it will be +/- 0 % anyway.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Junior Bettina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eastern USA
    Posts
    264
    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    OK here is another way, (when dad is out!) turn everything in the house off, read the electric meter as accurately as you can, turn the dryer on for 1 or 2 hours then at the end read the meter again, subtract start reading from end reading and divide by the number of hours, now multiply by 1000 for the number of watts used. The longer you do this test for the more accurate will be the result.

    Are you in the US? if so your supply voltage should be 110 not 220V. 220V is mostly europe (& Canada?) UK is 240V.
    Hey, that will work. My outside meter is a digital one so its easy to read. I can keep almost everything off and any remaining that may be on would be neglible compared to what the dryer draws. I can do a load of clothes and read a book until their done.

    Thanks. I will do that. BTW.. We have 220 volts coming into the house that the dryer and stove use. Everything else is 110.

    Bettina
    Emotionally based life form. The Fword will get you on my ignore list.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •