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Thread: Water vapor in your breath

  1. #1 Water vapor in your breath 
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    Hello everyone! Just joined this forum but don't really have the time to introduce myself at the moment. Just quickly want to state my question and then I will introduce myself later.

    So, this may sound ridiculous, but I'm sure some of you have seen the movie Frozen. If not, there is a character named Elsa who has magical ice powers, and when she breathes in the extreme cold, there is no condensation of water vapor, while there is in the characters surrounding her. My friend and I were discussing how this was possible, yet for her to still be living. One thought was that her body temperature is so cool that it prevents the condensation of water vapor, but how cool would this have to be? And wouldn't this hinder not only the function of her lungs as a whole, but her cells as well? What's the lowest temperature an animal cell (any animal cell, as we're assuming her cells may be modified, but still functional) can function to perform all of its reactions? I'm just wondering if there's a temperature she could be where it prevents the formation of water droplets in the cold, but still allows for her to perform all of her cellular functions.

    If you think this is stupid, please try and keep it to yourself, lol. We're trying to make sense of something by making a workable theory. I'm trying to learn something. No harm in that, right?


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  3. #2  
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    yah elsa should be dead unless magic is real......so, if you really want to get scientific the ice coming from her hands would require her hands to be very cold, so her blood would all freeze causing her muscles to stop working, and her brain, and the lowest tempature for an animal is probably some antartctic fish so around -130 F in the waters of death ",,,"


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    Right, but I am assuming the magic is real, and is controlled from the outside of her, leaving her insulated from the cold somehow. My only real question was if it could be possible for her breath to be cool enough where you wouldn't see her breath, but her body could still function. Thanks for your reply, btw.
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chinnie15 View Post
    So, this may sound ridiculous, but I'm sure some of you have seen the movie Frozen. If not, there is a character named Elsa who has magical ice powers, and when she breathes in the extreme cold, there is no condensation of water vapor, while there is in the characters surrounding her. My friend and I were discussing how this was possible, yet for her to still be living.
    Her lungs could be air temperature. There could be a heat exchanger in her throat. She could have a different alveolar lining than everyone else that is permeable to oxygen but not water. She'd have to excrete CO2 some other way. Perhaps she has a lot of gas?
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