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Thread: Please help me with identification of this

  1. #1 Please help me with identification of this 
    Forum Freshman kimboley's Avatar
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    I have an old microscope I would like to sale.
    Hours of research has given me no information on the manufacturer of this microscope ever making microscopes.
    So, I can not simply enter a model number and get the specific details.
    I am uncertain if this is a stereo microscope or just a binocular microscope.

    This is how I am going to list the ad, based on what I have been able to conclude from research.
    I am asking if you could look at the photos and tell me what appears to be incorrect.

    Or if you have seen or used a microscope by this manufacturer any info would be wonderful.
    And if there is some way I can look at the head or something to know the difference between a binocular vs stereo.

    All intel will be very much appreciated

    Frieseke & Hoepfner Binocular Microscope
    The ocular lenses can be pulled out and each eyepiece has it's own focus
    There are 2 ocular lenses that are X6
    This item has a diopter adjustment

    The objectives sit in a turrent that holds 4 objectives
    Objectives included:
    10:1 0,30 170 (5966)
    43:1B 0,65 170 (5840)
    100:1 Oel 1,30 170 (5219)
    5:1 0,11 (5114)

    The observation table has two adjustments that will move left/right as well as forward/back
    There is a coarse adjustment that raises/lowers the observation table and condenser to zoom in and focus
    This microscope also has a fine focus adjustment
    Lever to raise and lower the condenser
    Adjustments to move the condenser left/right and forward/back as well

    Two sided adjustable mirror

    The microscope is aprox 14 inches tall











    If more photos will help, I will be happy to post them. Thank you in advance for all responses.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
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    Please show us a picture of the objective turret and one from farther away so we can see the complete scope.

    When I started looking for Frieseke & Hoepfner I got a lot of military and nuclear looking stuff showing up on my browser.


    Last edited by dan hunter; February 14th, 2014 at 07:47 PM.
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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman kimboley's Avatar
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    IMG]http://i1283.photobucket.com/albums/a545/Cerberus5150/22079_zpsdb5867ed.jpg[/IMG]

    I found they have several patents including the fine adjustment on the microscope. (If I understood what I was reading)
    The division of their company was purchased by another company...
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  5. #4  
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    I found this page and used Google translate to get an English text.

    Kennst du Erlangen (KDE) - Straße anzeigen: Frauenauracher Straße - Geschichte von Friesecke & Hoepfner

    Machine translations usually read a bit odd, but maybe it helps.

    History of the work Friesecke & Hoepfner / FAG
    In 1900, a cigar factory was created on the site at the Tennenloher road.
    In the firstWorld War, this factory was then converted by the former owners in an armaments factory.After the war, they then made in the halls temporarily lighters, flashlights and razors.
    1923 in the wake of inflation parted previous owner Hofmann and game and the site was no longer used.
    Until 1936 the area was then more or less unused.After the nationalization by the Nazis in this year of operation for the Reich Labor Service as an accommodation was used.
    Well started under the leadership of the Reich Air Ministry, the production of air defense equipment. (Headlights for Flakleitgeräte etc.) by necessary new buildings, the factory expanded rapidly to about 90 000 square meters.
    1939 saw the founding of the company Friesecke and Hoepfner in Berlin Babelsberg and at the same time to take over the company Hofmann GmbH in Erlangen.Purpose of the company was now the production of aeronautical equipment.
    After the 2ndWorld War II took the Americans the factory for repair and construction of military vehicles.
    With the June 1, 1948, the return of the work, then began to civilian life of the company Friesecke and Hoepfner.
    The manufacturing operation is now focused on major products hydraulics and control technology - thickness gauges and radiometers.In addition, were cinema, weaving looms (Fa Schönherr) and hobbing (from PFauter), prepared as extruders for the plastics industry.
    In 1952, the Bavarian state bank, the company and led the production continues at current levels.
    In 1954 increased shareholder of FAG Kugelfischer Schweinfurt, the Family Shepherd is a business and conducted the operation as Friesecke and Hoepfner on.
    First Financial problems led in 1981 to the fact that the company Friesecke and Hoepfner was fully incorporated into the FAG and henceforth was considered a plant 11.The product lines were divided into three product areas hydraulics and control technology with winding technology-radiometriche measurement and control technology, as well as radiation measuring and environmental engineering.
    The now dilapidated building fabric of the building, with the exception of 1964 related administrative building, the enormous costs of internal transport in the extensive grounds, the cost of heating and road maintenance in 1988 contrived in a feasibility study for the new building.The decision was quickly made for new construction.
    In 1989, the foundation stone was laid for the new buildings for hydraulic and control technology in Eltersdorf and for radiometry and radiation metrology at the Frauenauracher road.Investment for building DM 70 million
    As early as 1989 was the work in Eltersdorf be obtained of the year, the plants on the Frauenauracher road followed the June / July 1990.
    Financial problems at FAG - Ball Fischer in 1993 and the associated feedback on the core business of FAG in the manufacture and distribution of storage technology, as well as high staff cuts moving FAG all operating parts that do not fit this core area to sell.
    The plant in Eltersdorf continues operation for hydraulic and control technology has been adopted by the U.S. Fa Hale Products, and therefore part Idex Corporation, the industrial winding technique is by MBO an independent business within this unit.
    The works on the Frauenauracher road Radiometric measurement and control technology, as well as radiation metrology and environmental were taken from Electronic Systems USA and continue to operate as independent companies.
    In the meantime, these two areas The building Frauenauracher road 98 are housed together in the building Frauenauracher road 96. Was acquired by Siemens.

    That microscope is a binocular biological microscope. It looks pretty old and I think it must be missing part of the stage. Possibly there was a plate that would have filled the hole where the slides would sit? A replacement part should not be too hard to have made.
    It might date from the war years, maybe even a little bit older. The fact it has the Abbe style condenser and lenses suggest it isn't much older than that.
    I am not an antiques expert though and it could be later. I have a Zeiss Jena that is from the 60s and it has a similar look to it. Heavy, black, binocular.

    One thing about these microscopes is all the lens threads and sizes are standard, so even if the lenses are showing their age they can be exchanged for new(er) ones.

    My Zeiss would sell for at least $400.00 if I wanted to sell it so I think you should expect at least something in that range if you are selling it yourself.
    I very strongly suggest you take it to an antique appraiser and/or to instrument dealer and find out what it is worth before selling it.

    If you had the case and accessories that would increase the price quite a bit.

    Judging from your pictures that scope would still work extremely well as a student scope for biology if you added a light source.
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  6. #5  
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    OH, I almost forgot your other question.
    Stereo scopes will either have one single huge objective lens, like a cyclop's eye. Any change of magnification in the objective is through a zoom mechanism like in a camera lens

    Or if they are the older style they will have two objective lenses together, usually in a block that can be slid of the frame and swapped with another set to change magnification.

    Stero microscopes are usually faily low power and have a lot of space between the objective and the stage which is why they are often used as disecting scopes. Stages are usually solid white or black and the lighting is above the stage instead of underneath it.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman kimboley's Avatar
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    Thank you so much for your help. The information about the manufacturer is helpful, as well as how I can tell the difference in microscope types. I also have a Jena, that I am planning to sell, but finding information on it will just require my time. I have 6 objectives and 4 eyepieces for it. I would often interchange the objectives between the two microscopes, mostly using the monocular Jena. Between the two I have 10 objectives and 4 eyepieces from Jena I have the wood box and the key, lock still works.
    Was going to list it for 300.00, it has the 4 objective turret, and extra eyepieces and objectives. Not really sure just what came with it originally.
    But thank you again for finding that info.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman kimboley's Avatar
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    If I can find the site that said that said that one of these guys (in the name) patented the fine tune of the microscope, since there is really no information that this company made microscopes, could this be a prototype or something they made to test the patent? Not sure if I explained that correctly. But if I could establish this, would it be more valuable?
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  9. #8  
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    I can't help you there.
    You might need to find a local expert (which I think you should be doing with any antiques) who can advise you better on values.
    I would point out that the lack of information about this scope suggests it is a rare item.
    If they were more common like Zeiss or American Optical are you would see them being posted on places like eBay.

    Patents might not mean much, but it might give you a possible earliest time for it. Even if it was a prototype it would not be much older than the patent, and it does not look like a prototype. It looks like a production unit.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman kimboley's Avatar
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    I have listed it for 400.00 and after 7 views got an offer for 250.00 On the 3rd day I got an offer for again 250.00 and a message asking what is the lowest I would go. I do have the plate the goes on the slide table. But had it off in some of the photos. I am going to take your advice and find a microscope shot that will take a look at it. One of my offers was from somebody who actually lives in Germany. Thank you for your help.
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  11. #10  
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    Very good.
    I am glad you are going to have it appraised. I think it is important to have an idea of the fair market value of any item you are offering for sale

    As for the offers, well you have to decide what is a fair value for you on that one.
    The buyer asking for a lowest price is an offer to haggle. Their opening offer was more than half of your asking price so they are definitely interested.
    How well you haggle and what bargain you can get is entirely your business.
    But:
    If they are a dealer they likely have a good idea of how much they could make on it and how much they can pay without losing.
    They are only $150.00 below what you asked for.
    If you say you are firm on price they might pay what you are asking or at least raise their offer to an acceptable level for you, or maybe you could counter their offer with a price of $375.00 to signal you are willing to negotiate and see what they offer back.
    Last edited by dan hunter; February 17th, 2014 at 06:50 AM.
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