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Thread: in a massage does heat penetrate from the person giving the massage to the person receiving the massage and vice versa?

  1. #1 in a massage does heat penetrate from the person giving the massage to the person receiving the massage and vice versa? 
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    in a massage does heat penetrate from the person giving the massage to the person receiving the massage and vice versa?


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    Malignant Pimple shlunka's Avatar
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    Depends, are you massaging a cadaver?


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    if im posting im not a cadaver
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    Quote Originally Posted by gouberdeen View Post
    if im posting im not a cadaver
    Some days this forum supplies the best stand up comedy material, lol...
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Depends on the relative temperature of the hands of the masseur and the part of the person being massaged they are in contact with, heat will always spontaneously pass from a hotter body to a colder one.
    Is the heat generation resulted from friction in massages negligible? I wonder if oils used coupled with the pressure applied in massages reduces friction in this regard. Any thoughts?
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Depends on how vigorous the massage is . Any heat generated by friction would heat both the hands of the masseur and the part being massaged and I'm guessing this is not what the OP is on about1, oil would reduce friction too...
    I was doing some superficial reading about heat transfer in the human body on wikipedia, but unfortunately it doesn't reveal much in regards to the thread topic.

    Heat transfer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    1. Maybe I'm being cynical but I'm expecting some new age woo about how massage is responsible for some magic/miracle healing/blah blah blah in this thread at some point...
    The best massages can achieve is to help in relieving discomfort if I'm not mistaken. I certainly enjoy an occasional massage now and again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scoobydoo1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Depends on the relative temperature of the hands of the masseur and the part of the person being massaged they are in contact with, heat will always spontaneously pass from a hotter body to a colder one.
    Is the heat generation resulted from friction in massages negligible? I wonder if oils used coupled with the pressure applied in massages reduces friction in this regard. Any thoughts?
    A person can do about 100 watts of work, like pedaling a bicycle, for extended periods. Working moderately hard, I guess it would be possible to produce about 25 watts of work during a massage, and this would be converted to heat. That's about the size of heater that would be used to heat a 5 gallon aquarium. I think you would be able to feel the warmth of a vigorous massage.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    A person can do about 100 watts of work, like pedaling a bicycle, for extended periods. Working moderately hard, I guess it would be possible to produce about 25 watts of work during a massage, and this would be converted to heat. That's about the size of heater that would be used to heat a 5 gallon aquarium. I think you would be able to feel the warmth of a vigorous massage.
    Is the process of heat transference from one body to another dependent on any specific factors? Conductivity, ambient heat loss, etc perhaps?
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    The other issue is that the massage is of living tissue which has its own heat processes. So moving a muscle by an external process can instigate a similar effect to warming that muscle by the person exercising it themselves.

    I'll leave it to someone else to come up with the maths for that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gouberdeen View Post
    if im posting im not a cadaver
    So, someone else is the cadaver, or the masseur.

    Does it matter who? jocular
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    , does this need a NSFW warning or is it going to turn woo?
    Am ignorant. NSFW is....? No Shit ForeWarned, Not Specifically For Women, Non Sequiter Formal Wiggling........?? jocular
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    NSFW = Not Suitable For Work.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scoobydoo1 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    A person can do about 100 watts of work, like pedaling a bicycle, for extended periods. Working moderately hard, I guess it would be possible to produce about 25 watts of work during a massage, and this would be converted to heat. That's about the size of heater that would be used to heat a 5 gallon aquarium. I think you would be able to feel the warmth of a vigorous massage.
    Is the process of heat transference from one body to another dependent on any specific factors? Conductivity, ambient heat loss, etc perhaps?
    If the heat is being transferred by conduction from a warmer body to a cooler body, the conductivity would be a factor, but what I estimated was heat generated by work done. If you are putting energy in as work, that will show up as an increase in temperature somehow, some way. That's just conservation of energy.

    The body is constantly generating heat from metabolic processes, and has to lose this heat to the ambient external environment by conduction and convection, or the temperature goes up. If more heat is added by friction, the surface temperature rises, and the rate of heat transfer increases until a new equilibrium is reached.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    If the heat is being transferred by conduction from a warmer body to a cooler body, the conductivity would be a factor, but what I estimated was heat generated by work done.
    In other words, there will probably be some heat transference from one body to another if there is direct contact. I'm taking a wild guess here so do correct me if I'm wrong; if there is heat transference/loss between the human body and the environment, and similarly between a human body and another body, do our bodies (metabolism) constantly compensates to keep our body temperatures at a moderately consistent and "comfortable" level?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    If you are putting energy in as work, that will show up as an increase in temperature somehow, some way. That's just conservation of energy.
    I'd figured as much after reading all those perpetual motion threads. It goes to show that we can "learn" something from trash bin materials, although not what the OPs was meant to convey.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    The body is constantly generating heat from metabolic processes, and has to lose this heat to the ambient external environment by conduction and convection, or the temperature goes up. If more heat is added by friction, the surface temperature rises, and the rate of heat transfer increases until a new equilibrium is reached.
    Hmm, with regards to the thread question of heat "penetration", does heat behaves in that manner? I figured that a "heated" portion of the body radiates heat to other parts of the body via conduction through a medium. Would heat generated from friction (say by a massage) penetrate oppose to radiate?
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    In other words, there will probably be some heat transference from one body to another if there is direct contact. I'm taking a wild guess here so do correct me if I'm wrong; if there is heat transference/loss between the human body and the environment, and similarly between a human body and another body, do our bodies (metabolism) constantly compensates to keep our body temperatures at a moderately consistent and "comfortable" level?
    Our bodies are trying to regulate our internal temperature to about 98.6 degrees F (37 C). However, if the external temperature is 98.6 F, that feels too hot, because of the internal metabolic heat. To feel comfortable we need to maintain a continuous flow of heat from the inside to the outside. This means there is a temperature gradient that feels comfortable. At rest, for most people, that comfort zone would be a skin surface temperature of about 91.4 F (33 C) and ambient temperature about 72 F (~22C).
    Temperature of a Healthy Human (Skin Temperature)
    In order to regulate our internal temperature, there might be some changes to metabolism, but for the most part it's done by increasing or decreasing skin temperature (by changing flow of blood to the surface), or sweating.

    If two people's bodies come into contact, the portions of skin that are in contact with each other are no longer losing heat to the external environment. This area will feel warm. The thermal equilibrium would be maintained probably by the blood circulating the excess heat to other parts of the body where it can be lost by conduction, convection and radiation.

    Hmm, with regards to the thread question of heat "penetration", does heat behaves in that manner? I figured that a "heated" portion of the body radiates heat to other parts of the body via conduction through a medium. Would heat generated from friction (say by a massage) penetrate oppose to radiate?
    Heat from a massage would be similar to heat from metabolism. It's generated within the muscles that are being massaged. I wouldn't say it penetrates, which would imply movement of heat from outside in. In order to maintain equilibrium internal temperature, that excess heat would have to be carried away by conduction, convection and radiation processes.
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    My apologies to gouberdeen for somewhat hijacking your thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Our bodies are trying to regulate our internal temperature to about 98.6 degrees F (37 C). However, if the external temperature is 98.6 F, that feels too hot, because of the internal metabolic heat.
    So, even if our internal temperature and external temperature are one and the same, we would probably still "feel uncomfortably warm"? Without an in depth knowledge in biology, I'd say that's kinda odd.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    In order to regulate our internal temperature, there might be some changes to metabolism, but for the most part it's done by increasing or decreasing skin temperature (by changing flow of blood to the surface), or sweating.
    So that we may lose or gain heat through the three processes of conduction, convection and radiation to stay comfortable?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Heat from a massage would be similar to heat from metabolism. It's generated within the muscles that are being massaged. I wouldn't say it penetrates, which would imply movement of heat from outside in. In order to maintain equilibrium internal temperature, that excess heat would have to be carried away by conduction, convection and radiation processes.
    The reason I'm curious about this is because I have a low tolerance to low temperatures. As mentioned in my profile, I'm currently residing in Singapore, and I have no trouble wearing a sweater even in this heat. I tend to behave like certain reptiles and like to bask in the blazing sun, often in a sweater. Odd, I know.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scoobydoo1 View Post
    My apologies to gouberdeen for somewhat hijacking your thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Our bodies are trying to regulate our internal temperature to about 98.6 degrees F (37 C). However, if the external temperature is 98.6 F, that feels too hot, because of the internal metabolic heat.
    So, even if our internal temperature and external temperature are one and the same, we would probably still "feel uncomfortably warm"? Without an in depth knowledge in biology, I'd say that's kinda odd.
    The problem is, it wouldn't stay at that temperature for long. As long as you are generating heat internally, it has to be removed or temperature will rise. The only way the heat will be removed is by a temperature difference from inside to outside.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    In order to regulate our internal temperature, there might be some changes to metabolism, but for the most part it's done by increasing or decreasing skin temperature (by changing flow of blood to the surface), or sweating.
    So that we may lose or gain heat through the three processes of conduction, convection and radiation to stay comfortable?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Heat from a massage would be similar to heat from metabolism. It's generated within the muscles that are being massaged. I wouldn't say it penetrates, which would imply movement of heat from outside in. In order to maintain equilibrium internal temperature, that excess heat would have to be carried away by conduction, convection and radiation processes.
    The reason I'm curious about this is because I have a low tolerance to low temperatures. As mentioned in my profile, I'm currently residing in Singapore, and I have no trouble wearing a sweater even in this heat. I tend to behave like certain reptiles and like to bask in the blazing sun, often in a sweater. Odd, I know.
    Your metabolic rate must be unusually low.
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    Your metabolic rate must be unusually low.
    That's what I thought. Get your thyroid checked was my next thought.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gouberdeen View Post
    in a massage does heat penetrate from the person giving the massage to the person receiving the massage and vice versa?
    This is a difficult one!
    As an aside, I am disappointed to learn that someone I have long admired, President Yahya "William" Jammeh of The Gambia has announced his country will leave the Commonwealth.
    The President is not afraid to speak his mind! In 2008, according to the Independent newspaper in the UK, he told gays and lesbians to leave the country or have their heads cut off.
    Getting back on thread, he has also declared he can cure Aids with a herbal body rub, or massage, and bananas.
    I have decided he will no longer be listed as one of my chums.
    I must add that I may have given El Presidente von Superbo the wrong middle name.
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