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Thread: Found A Young Sparrow Bird HELP!

  1. #1 Found A Young Sparrow Bird HELP! 
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    Found A Sparrow Baby Bird Seem He Has Most Of His Feathers. But i think something is wrong with him, i dont really know what they eat but i was able to feed him wet bread, and the next day i feed him wet dog food. he seems to be eating ok. he dosent seem to be able to walk right and his head is like upsidedown and he likes to keep it that way. i think he might be "special" or something. i wanted to know what could i feed him. am i feeding him ok? i feed him every hour.IMG_1069.JPGIMG_1068.JPG
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    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
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    You feed it bread soaked in milk. In little pieces.

    And I'm afraid to tell you that the bird most likely has a congenital disease called "Stargazer Syndrome". Like this finch:



    There is nothing you can do to help it.


    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
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    Check your local laws on caring for ophaned wild animals.
    Care of Orphaned Wild Animals
    Legal Requirements
    Anyone interested in caring for injured or orphan wildlife should be aware that specific county, state and federal regulations exist governing their possession and care. Permits, usually given free of charge to qualified individuals, are required to handle the majority of wild species. Degree of protection varies with location and species.
    It is imperative that the veterinary practice inform clients of the legal responsibilities involved in the care of wildlife, especially with the more unusual animals such as birds of prey. These animals require a long-term, well-organized commitment by a knowledgeable individual or group. It would be advisable for the practice to keep an up-to-date list of local wildlife authorities, such as the local conservation officer or game warden.
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    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
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    Is that some kind of inner ear deformity? Rabbits get some kind of weird head tilt as well sometimes, and I was told it had something to do with their ears and balance.
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    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Check your local laws on caring for ophaned wild animals.
    Care of Orphaned Wild Animals
    Legal Requirements
    Anyone interested in caring for injured or orphan wildlife should be aware that specific county, state and federal regulations exist governing their possession and care. Permits, usually given free of charge to qualified individuals, are required to handle the majority of wild species. Degree of protection varies with location and species.
    It is imperative that the veterinary practice inform clients of the legal responsibilities involved in the care of wildlife, especially with the more unusual animals such as birds of prey. These animals require a long-term, well-organized commitment by a knowledgeable individual or group. It would be advisable for the practice to keep an up-to-date list of local wildlife authorities, such as the local conservation officer or game warden.
    Good advice. I once found a very young baby raccoon lying on what appeared to be what was left of its mother. I took it home and cared for it for a couple of months. It didn't even have teeth when I found it. It fit in the palm of my hand. Anyway, I took care of it giving it kitten formula from a tiny bottle. And it became quite the playful pet when suddenly good sense kicked in and I realized it wouldn't be able to go back to the wild and I had no idea how to care for it any further than I had. My dog treated it as if it was her pup and often groomed it and kept it out of trouble. So I called the local wildlife commission and they advised me that technically they could arrest me for poaching or trapping a bear out of season. Apparently raccoons belong to the bear family. But they said they aren't in the business of throwing well intentioned people into jail and considering I likely saved its life they simply gave me the contact information of a wildlife rehabilitater and told me to surrender the animal. They did let me know that they would contact her and let her know to be expecting me. So I did. And I was glad I did too. The rehabilitation specialist said that while I did an excellent job, the young raccoon was just on the verge of coming into heat and apparently female raccoons are vicious when they are in heat. She probably would have caused considerable damage and injury to my home and family. I was assured she would be released as soon as she was taught how to hunt for food and that she would be fine.

    I doubt a sparrow would be as much trouble as a raccoon but at the time, I didn't think a raccoon was that big a deal.

    Birds are extremely delicate though. If that bird has any chance of survival at all, it would be with professionals.
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    Thank you i really appreciate your help. But its sad theres no way to fix it. Im just going to try to maintain him lets see what happens. I dont have the heart to just leave him there -.-
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post

    Birds are extremely delicate though. If that bird has any chance of survival at all, it would be with professionals.
    Good point, and birds can carry disease. Apparently, this is a sick one.
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  9. #8  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    "Stargazing" is treatable. If you're really concerned, you might consult with your vet. Depending upon the cause, it can be corrected. Aside from that, I'm not particularly familiar with it.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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