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Thread: Metallic bonds

  1. #1 Metallic bonds 
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    I know Metal bonds in such a way that electrons flow relatively freely through out the object, so what stoppes metal wire from fusing when you fold it over?


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    You appear to be asking about fusion, really.
    Nuclear fusion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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    Ophiolater Nehushtan's Avatar
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    Fusing is just another term for “melting”.
    Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nehushtan View Post
    Fusing is just another term for “melting”.
    True. But since he asked about atomic movement... Either way, the electrons are exchanged, not fused and the exchange of free electrons does not fuse either atoms or metal.
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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    By fusing, you mean creating bonds, yes?

    You can create new bonds in metal, but you have to apply energy because bonds are simply stored energy. If you hammer metal together enough or heat it up, you certainly can create new bonds. Simply touching the material to itself is not energetic enough to build new bonds in metal.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    sorry, fusing was probably a bad word to use. Thank you Flick, that answered my question.
    that said, would the electrons flow between three or four sheets of say... iron stalked on top of one another?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil87 View Post
    sorry, fusing was probably a bad word to use. Thank you Flick, that answered my question.
    that said, would the electrons flow between three or four sheets of say... iron stalked on top of one another?
    In general, electrons move, or "flow" either from an area having an excess of them, or to an area having a deficiency of them. When they are "on the move", they constitute a flow of electric current. An example exactly like your "stacking" question exists in alternating current transformer cores, which consist of stacks of thin iron sheet, the surfaces of which are intended to LIMIT transfer of electrons between them, which occurs due to the alternating magnetization of the core. The electrons which DO manage to get through, cause the core to be essentially a hunk of short-circuited iron, which condition creates unwanted heat, a loss wished to be minimized.

    jocular
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil87 View Post
    sorry, fusing was probably a bad word to use. Thank you Flick, that answered my question.
    that said, would the electrons flow between three or four sheets of say... iron stalked on top of one another?
    In general, electrons move, or "flow" either from an area having an excess of them, or to an area having a deficiency of them. When they are "on the move", they constitute a flow of electric current. An example exactly like your "stacking" question exists in alternating current transformer cores, which consist of stacks of thin iron sheet, the surfaces of which are intended to LIMIT transfer of electrons between them, which occurs due to the alternating magnetization of the core. The electrons which DO manage to get through, cause the core to be essentially a hunk of short-circuited iron, which condition creates unwanted heat, a loss wished to be minimized.

    jocular
    Edit: The core material is commonly known as "silicon steel".
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