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Thread: Consequences of very Large Structures in our Universe

  1. #1 Consequences of very Large Structures in our Universe 
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    If the Universe is non homogeneous and not Isotropic and the Cosmological Principle has to be abandoned what are the consequences for the Standard Model Big Bang Universe, and what other hypothesis are on the table that require such a result result.


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    There are no direct consequences for the standard model Big-Bang universe itself, there are just consequences in our trying to understand our place in it - the whole picture becomes much more complicated to calculate. If there are very large concentrations of matter that are sparsely distributed throughout the universe (we have only found one such structure in our observable universe so far), then there may well be places in the universe that expand more than others, for instance, due to the gravity local to those structures decelerating the expansion (or slowing the acceleration) more than in other places.

    The cosmological principle itself is an idealisation - it is simply the assumption that nobody inhabits a "special" place in the universe, and that everyone, wherever they are, would see similar effects to the effects we see here. But it all depends on the scale that you are examining.

    There is an obvious difference between the conditions on the surface of the Earth and the conditions in outer space, for instance. But if we zoom out to the scale of the observable universe, everything seems pretty much the same everywhere in comparison with everywhere else - clusters of galaxies, with filaments of galaxies connecting them. So, what we have found is a particularly large cluster of galaxies in one place, but we have no idea how common these large clusters are outside of our observable universe. They might be relatively common, and we just happen to live "near" to one of them.

    But none of the above has any bearing on the Big-Bang paradigm itself - that the universe is expanding. All it means is that it becomes more complicated for us to get a feel of the bigger picture, as the universe seems a bit "lumpy" around here, but we don't know if we can assume it is as "lumpy" elsewhere.


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