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Thread: fasciation

  1. #1 fasciation 
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    what main reasons fasсiation in plants?


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    • #2  
      Forum Professor arKane's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Valya View Post
      what main reasons fasсiation in plants?
      Hi Valya and welcome to the forum. I don't have an answer for you but thought some pictures of fasciation in plants might help.













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    • #3  
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      Thank you, I've seen some pictures before.
      I found the post, 1954.1967 years


      I can not find studies of this topic for the last 20 years
      maybe someone has the data?
      thank you
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    • #4  
      Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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      Hello Vayla,

      Perhaps these links will be of some assistance.

      Fasciation in Vegetables and Fruits Weekly Crop Update

      Plant patterning : structural and molecular genetic aspects (Book, 2007) [WorldCat.org]

      Fascinating Fasciation

      The causes:
      Bacteria: Rhodococcus fascians (Tilford) Goodfellow [previously known as Corynebacterium fascians (Tilford) Dows.] is reported in some literature to cause fasciations.
      Goodfellow reclassified Cornybacterium fascians as Rhodococcus fascians in 1984. Previous names assigned this bacterium were Phytomonas fascians (Tilford, 1936), and Bacterium fascians (Lacey, 1939).
      Crespi (1992) reported fasciation due to bacterial infection was the result of the transmission of a linear plasmid (an extrachromosomal piece of DNA) containing a gene that synthesizes cytokinin. Root meristems are the major sites of cytokinin synthesis, moving through the xylem into the stems. Cytokinin is thought to function as a signal regulating when and where cell proliferation occurs in the plant. Cytokinin appears to have the ability to stimulate the proliferation of a wide spectrum of cell types (Fosket, 1994).
      Goethals et al., 2001, report the ability of Rhodococcus fascians to cause fasciations and other plant distortions, while involving a cytokinin-like compound, appears to involve other plant hormones as well. According to these researchers, the exact nature of the signals responsible for the hormonal change in the plant has not yet been identified. For more detail, check out the review by Goethals et al.
      Disease Transmission: It is not known if R. fascians is a true soil resident or simply a tranisient. It is known to be seedborne in some hosts and spread by vegetative vegetation and water (Putnam and Miller, 2007).
      Melodie Putnam, Director, Oregon State University Plant Clinic (personal communique - October 2, 2009) reports "every woody plant we have examined with fasciations have been negative for Rhodococcus fascians. The association of R. fascians with ribbon type (flattened) fasciation is more uncommon than otherwise. Only very few plants that display that type of distortion are actually infected with this bacterium - at least in our experience, and we have tested hundreds of plants."
      Plant Genetics: Many annual plants contain a gene responsible for the fasciation of vegetative or flower stems. Gregor Mendel, the father of modern genetics, demonstrated the gene for fasciation was a heritable trait in peas (Gottschalk, 1977). Fasciation was one of the seven characteristics he chose when illustrating the concept of dominant and recessive traits in his cross breeding of peas. These inherited fasciations are meristematic mutations which impart tumor-like properties to the meristem (Tang and Knap, 1998).
      The cockscomb celosia (Celosia argentea var cristata) is an excellent example of a plant with inherited fasciation. Other fasciated plants are often identified by the descriptive cultivar names of `torulosa' and `monstora'.
      It is not know if the fasciations in most woody plants are inherited. It is known, however, that the tendency toward fasciation is transmissible by budding and grafting once the woody plant develops a fasciation (Geneve, 1990). Growers who cut off fasciated branches often find this condition returns with the development of new branches.
      Miscellaneous causes: Herbicides, insects and physical injury to the growing tip are reported to stimulate the occurrence of fasciations (Geneve, 1990). Fasciations also are reported to come about through spontaneous mutations (Gabillard and Pitrat). Conditions favoring rapid growth also favor the development of fasciations.
      Fasciation Colorado State University Extension
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    • #5  
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      Thanks scheherazada,very useful information
      Left to find out how external agents affect the activation of the CLAVATA genes
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    • #6 ISSR primers 
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      Are used for ISSR- PCR forward primers only?
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