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Thread: eating yearling buck or doe?

  1. #1 eating yearling buck or doe? 
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    I watched a doe and yearling buck fawn browse the garden this eve, then just as it was getting dark, an antlered buck came in --kinda dark by then so I couldn't see his rack or size very well.
    anyway
    I would normally shoot the doe and let the yearling grow a bit more, but I was wondering if the young one wouldn't be a tad more tender---
    and, if so, which is the better course of action
    shoot and eat the doe
    or shoot and eat the yearling buck
    ........
    anyone compared the meat?


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  3. #2  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Man...I had a yearing in my scope one year. In the time it took me to ask myself "Is he big enough to take" he bounded over a brush pile and was out of sight. I haven't had much luck with deer hunting. Deer only show themselves to me whenever I don't have a rifle handy. In the five times I've been hunting, I've never sucessfully harvested a deer....but I did get to drink a lot of beer at the campsite at night. Now I have harvested turkey, wild hog, duck, quail, doves, rabbit and squirrels....I just have had bad luck deer hunting.


    Last edited by MacGyver1968; November 2nd, 2012 at 09:54 PM.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  4. #3  
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    Depends on the reason for the kill in the first place.

    If your only interest is in the meat, I fancy it's whether you prefer a strong gamey taste or a young tender texture. Or how much room is left in the freezer might make a smaller animal the better choice.

    If you're interested in culling numbers, you take what a natural predator would take. The young, old, lame, diseased, slow, stupid.

    If you're interested in 'improving' the local herd, you leave those with definitely desirable characteristics (whatever they may be) and take those with the characteristics that are definitely not wanted.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    I'm conflicted:
    more tender seems real good, and from the behaviour, I'm fairly certain the young one is (will grow into) a buck
    more meat, or more tender
    and then
    the good of the herd
    .........
    the way I butcher and cook, it's never "gamey", just a tad tough though, so when I make deer steaks, I cut across the grain of the meat, season well, and broil, or sear the surface over an open wood fire. And often soak in a sweet brine for hours before cooking.

    so far,
    hunting my back yard, I've had 4 times when a doe was browsing with a yearling, and always took the doe.
    I was thinking maybe this time i'd try the younger one and find out just how much more tender it'd be.

    I share the meat, and one friend of my science teacher son, said he didn't want any more unless it was more tender, which got me to wondering.....

    If I fill the smallish chest freezer, I stop fishing and hunting, and work on emptying the thing. When it's low enough, I move all that is left to the refridgerator's freezer, and turn off the chest freezer, let it air and dry out, clean thouroughly, wash down with vinigar, and get ready to fill it again.
    Normally, I work longer hours when we have longer days, and do a lot more cooking when it is cold short days, and I'm down feeding the fire(which is in the bunker under the garage just off the kitchen.

    Right now, I'm leaning toward trying tender this year, and I have other deer tags, so maybe get another doe, or a buck later on???
    (The second year I was working on my greenhouse, we were getting the roof glazing up, and I worked right through deer season, bought 5 deer tags, and didn't use one of them-------------but the previous year, I had filled the freezer, so we didn't run out untill the next summer-----more pasta, less meat-----------And, I lost 15 pounds into the bargain----yippee)
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  6. #5  
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    I think you're all barbaric, like me, which is orrible!

    That said, Would a yearling survive without the doe? As adelady said, in nature the young would more likely get hit than the parent. The parent is in a position to contribute to the population quicker than the yearling.

    If you wanna be in tune with nature why not go and see which one you can wrestle down and bite the jugular of?

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  7. #6  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    In tune with nature?
    (sigh)
    I live in a house, with electricity.
    I have a shop with enough power equiptment to double my electricity bill.
    I wear clothing.
    I have a truck, and rarely walk for any distance for anything but pleasure and exercise.
    I hunt with explosive charges that fire projectiles faster than the speed of sound.

    hmmmmmmm
    "in tune with nature"?
    I'll have to think about that one for awhile
    ..................
    I'm leaning more'n more toward shooting the yearling buck. If my guess that the yearling is indeed a buck is accurate---then does are more likely to produce next year's meat. and, I'll have the opportunity to test whether or not the younger meat comes off as more tender.

    (I'm salivating here)
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