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Thread: What is a Ketl?

  1. #1 What is a Ketl? 
    Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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    I'm trying to read some of the interesting stuff written in an old hotel guest book that my grandmother gave to me (my great-grandfather built the hotel and my grandparents owned it until they retired in the late 50's). On one page a guest has written a poem; like most of the entries in the book, the hand-writing takes a long time to decipher. The title of the poem is problematic: "The Twa Ketl's" (I think).


    Being Scottish myself I know that "The Twa..." means "The Two...", but I've no idea what "Ketl's" are supposed to be. Given the context of the poem it might have some connection with fish or fishing. Does any one know what a "Ketl" is? Or have I misread the word?


    Picture of the title and top verse is shown below:



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    • #2  
      Ascended Member Ascended's Avatar
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      Can't find anything on 'ketls', best guess would be some old fashioned way of spelling kettle, or it could be kells, kelts or ketts. The writing is a little difficult to read but you're spot on with the poetry bit as the first and second line clearly rhyme.


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    • #3  
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      Well, stretching a small bit of yarn a very long way.

      It seems that there's some problem from my reading of what you've shown, so ...... anything to do with " a fine kettle of fish".

      Or if you read down this page it might refer to having a feast of fish. Kettle of fish

      Could be either a muddle or a meal. Or neither of these.
      "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
      "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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      Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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      Adelady, I was going for "kettle" myself for a while but it didn't seem right the more I thought about it.
      Chrisgorlitz, yeah I think you could be right. It probably does say "Kelts".


      I found a salmon fishing forum where one person writes the following:


      I think a lot of people mix up ketls/baggots/rawners just through inexperience but your point is valid, we (unfortunately caught) a mended kelt (would have been close on 30lbs when it entered the system)

      Apparently baggots = an unspawned hen fish and rawner = an unspawned cock fish


      The guy on that forum used "Ketls" and "kelts" in the same sentence, so I'm guessing the first usage is a spelling mistake and the title of the poem is supposed to be the "The Twa Kelts" which translates to "The Two (Spawned) Salmon".




      For those interested I've transcribed some of the the top verse as:




      Indeed I think it's __?__ queer,
      That stalwart __?__ is not here,
      The eleventh February's came and gone
      An' in the loch we a hurrian!
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      First line the missing word is 'unco'. Meaning uncanny. unco - definition of unco by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

      Second line looks to be the name Tammas. A Scots version of Thomas.
      "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
      "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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      Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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      Thanks for that.

      I thought it said unco, but figured that wasn't even a word so didn't even bother to look it up, assuming I'd totally misread the word. Dumb assumption on my part.
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      I would have thought it's too cold to fish in February, but apparently the season starts in January or February in those parts.
      Salmon, Sea Trout, Coarse Fishing and Brown Trout Fishing Season Scotland

      It looks like the poet was getting in a bit of a dig at Tammas. Kelts are apparently not fair game, but are sometimes mistaken for fresh run fish by inexperienced anglers.
      http://www.adaa.org.uk/infoKelts.php

      The last word in the first verse is "remain."
      Last edited by Harold14370; October 25th, 2012 at 05:35 AM.
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    • #8  
      Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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      Yes, "remain" would make a lot more sense than what I had. Good spot.
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      Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Zwirko View Post
      Thanks for that.

      I thought it said unco, but figured that wasn't even a word so didn't even bother to look it up, assuming I'd totally misread the word. Dumb assumption on my part.
      Shame on you. Thrice shame and shame again. You claim to be Scottish and you are unaware of the opening stanza of Tam O'Shanter? Shame, shame shame.

      When chapman billies leave the street
      And drouthy neebors, neebors meet
      As market-days are wearing late
      An' folk begin to tak the gate
      While we sit bousing at the nappy
      An' getting fou and unco happy
      We think na on the lang Scots miles
      The mosses, waters, slaps, and styles
      That lie between us and our hame
      Whare sits our sulky sullen dame
      Gathering her brows like gathering storm
      Nursing her wrath to keep it warm.
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    • #10  
      Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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      I'm ashamed to admit that the only Rab I can quote from is Rab C. Nesbit.
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