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Thread: Hey hey good lookin'...whatcha got cookin'?

  1. #1 Hey hey good lookin'...whatcha got cookin'? 
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    I like to cook, and I'm always looking for new recipes. I thought I start this thread, so that my fellow members that like to cook can share what they are cooking...and so others who would like to learn a little more in the kitchen can come away with added knowledge.

    I'll start by posting one of my mom's recipes. When mom, from Tupelo, Miss. was in school in Tulsa, Ok., there was a restaurant called "The Brown Derby" who's signature dish was a type of meatballs. She missed having them, so she asked her friend, who knew the owner of the restaurant, and he sent her the recipe. I love the "diablo sauce" (its not hot) that goes on the meatballs...I think it's great with a lot of things including chicken and roast beef.

    Brown Derby

    2 pounds ground beef
    1 beaten egg
    2 teaspoons of dry mustard
    2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1/4 cup water

    Mix thoroughly. shape into 2" balls
    Beat 2 additional eggs
    Make 2 to 3 cups of finely crushed cracker crumbs
    Dip meat balls into egg mix and roll in cracker crumbs.
    Brown in hot oil and place meat balls in a shallow baking pan.
    Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes (45 to 50 if frozen)

    Diablo sauce for Brown Derby

    1 can chicken broth
    1/2 can beef broth
    1/4 cup chili sauce
    2 tablespoons of Mustard
    2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce
    1 tablespoon of soy sauce
    1 or 2 drops of Tabasco sauce
    1 1/2 teaspoons of sweet pickle relish
    1 teaspoon sugar
    2 teaspoons of cornstarch (mixed with 1 tablespoon of cold water)
    1/2 cup of chopped mushrooms (optional)









    Serve with traditional corn pudding:


    Corn pudding

    1 can of creamed corn
    1 can of whole corn (or fresh corn is better, if you got it)
    3 large dollups of sour cream (approx 1/2 cup)
    2 eggs (beaten)
    1/2 of stick of butter (melted)
    1 handful of shreaded cheddar cheese
    1 package of corn bread mix.
    1 cup of crushed Ritz crackers or bread crumbs.

    Mix corn, eggs, butter, cheese, cornbread mix and sour cream in a bowl. Pour into a buttered casserole dish, and top with crushed crackers or bread crumbs.
    Cover with aluminum foil, and bake for 30 minutes at 350F. Then uncover and bake for an additional 15 minutes.

    To put a delightful end to the meal...why not try Mac's Mom's pecan pie reciepe:

    Mom's Pecan Pie Recipe (2 pies)

    1 1/2 cups of sugar
    4 tsp. cornstarch/flour
    dash salt
    5 eggs
    3/4 stick melted margerine
    1 cup of dark Karo dark corn syrup
    1/2 cup of Karo light corn syrup
    (or 3/4 cup each)
    1 TBS vanilla
    3 cups pecans
    2 pie crusts

    Mix sugar, cornstarch & salt well. Add eggs one at time and beat well. Add melted margerine, karo and vanilla. Put 1 1/2 cups of coursely chopped pecans in each pie crust and divide mixture evenly between 2 crust
    Bake approximately 1 hour at 350 degrees.


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    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Here's one of my favorites. This is Marina's recipe, (a little French lady that lives down the street from me) that I used to make at "The Good Life" when I worked for her.

    Pasta Salad.

    Rotini pasta (cooked al dente)
    Shredded carrots
    Chopped roma tomatoes
    sliced green olives
    diced red onion
    Italian salad dressing
    one packet of "good seasons" dry Italian salad dressing mix
    olive oil
    Parmesan cheese (optional, leave off for Vegans)

    Carnivores can add diced ham.

    Mix in a bowl and refrigerate. Leave off the italian dressing if your going to store...it will make the veggies mushy after time.


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  4. #3  
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    I come from the "comfort food" school of cooking....everything I cook has butter and bacon in it, and will raise you heart attack risk significantly. My sister is always complaining that I'm trying to kill her slowly with carbs and fat...so I'm looking for some good healthy recipes. Plus, I have a buddy on another board who's trying to cut to make fighting weight (the manly way of saying dieting) and I'm looking for some lo-cal recipes for him. So if you know any...I'd be glad to hear them.
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  5. #4  
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    Just a general tip for people trying to cut down on oily/fatty dressings for salad type meals.

    Throw together some tuna, lettuce or other greens - lots of greens, chopped tomato (or crushed canned tomato when out of season - tastes much better than fresh cardboard tomato), chopped celery, whatever other salad things you like - but no cheese or croutons if you're controlling your intake. Then thoroughly mix in some dried chives or similar oniony herb, maybe a dried Italian herb mix. If you let this sit for 10 or more minutes - or pack it for a lunch you take to work - it basically turns the moisture from the tuna and the tomatoes into a self-dressing for the salad.

    One of the blokes I used to work with put me on to this. I haven't done it for a long while - I no longer go to an office - but I really liked it.

    The other thing about salad dressings if you want to use them. Any dressing left in the bottom of the bowl?

    You used too much
    . It should - just barely - coat the ingredients with absolutely no surplus left to accumulate in the container.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Plus, I have a buddy on another board who's trying to cut to make fighting weight (the manly way of saying dieting) and I'm looking for some lo-cal recipes for him. So if you know any...I'd be glad to hear them.
    Hint 1. One thing your buddy should bear in mind for a weight loss diet. I've found when I've been on such an eating plan, not entirely for weight loss, that you need to eat much more food than you're used to. Much more.

    The one that sticks in my mind -and the mind of anyone who ever tried it - made me have things I hated, like a glass of milk twice a day and no spices of any kind - not even a piece of carrot cake though my plan allowed cake or biscuits (cookies) several times a week. (My friend's plan disallowed sugar of any kind, only a couple of pieces of fruit a week, but unbelievable amounts of protein. Her family had to hide their own supplies of sugar in extraordinary places. She was like an addict, tearing the kitchen apart at 3am just to find a sugar cube.) Regardless of the individual excluded or compulsory items, the total quantity of food seemed enormous. I've lost/ permanently lent the book, so I don't have the details any more. But it was really good for energy levels and 'shape' management rather than weight loss.

    Hint 2. He should try looking at a diabetic cooking site for low GI recipes. A lot of them are low carb anyway, but if low GI works for diabetics, it can't be too bad for the rest of us.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Plus, I have a buddy on another board who's trying to cut to make fighting weight (the manly way of saying dieting) and I'm looking for some lo-cal recipes for him. So if you know any...I'd be glad to hear them.
    Hint 1. One thing your buddy should bear in mind for a weight loss diet. I've found when I've been on such an eating plan, not entirely for weight loss, that you need to eat much more food than you're used to. Much more.

    The one that sticks in my mind -and the mind of anyone who ever tried it - made me have things I hated, like a glass of milk twice a day and no spices of any kind - not even a piece of carrot cake though my plan allowed cake or biscuits (cookies) several times a week. (My friend's plan disallowed sugar of any kind, only a couple of pieces of fruit a week, but unbelievable amounts of protein. Her family had to hide their own supplies of sugar in extraordinary places. She was like an addict, tearing the kitchen apart at 3am just to find a sugar cube.) Regardless of the individual excluded or compulsory items, the total quantity of food seemed enormous. I've lost/ permanently lent the book, so I don't have the details any more. But it was really good for energy levels and 'shape' management rather than weight loss.

    Hint 2. He should try looking at a diabetic cooking site for low GI recipes. A lot of them are low carb anyway, but if low GI works for diabetics, it can't be too bad for the rest of us.

    He's been eating the same damn thing everyday...chicken breast with a little rice and some veggies. So far his cutting routine (diet ) is doing well...but I was just looking for some variety for him.
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  8. #7  
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    What! For every meal?
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  9. #8  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    What! For every meal?
    From what I understand...yeah. I know nothing of cooking to cut....so I was looking for some help....just to help my boy out with a little change.

    I found a couple of reciepes he said it would try...one for portabella hamburgers and on one for eggplant steak:

    Grilled portobello mushroom burgers
    Serves 4
    Ingredients

    4 large portobello mushroom caps, 5 inches in diameter
    1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
    1/2 cup water
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    4 whole-wheat buns, toasted
    4 slices tomato
    4 slices red onion
    2 bibb lettuce leaves, halved

    Directions

    Clean mushrooms with a damp cloth and remove their stems. Place in a glass dish, stem (gill) side up.

    To prepare the marinade, in a small bowl whisk together the vinegar, water, sugar, garlic, cayenne pepper and olive oil. Drizzle the marinade over the mushrooms. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for about 1 hour, turning mushrooms once.

    Prepare a hot fire in a charcoal grill or heat a gas grill or broiler. Away from the heat source, lightly coat the grill rack or broiler pan with cooking spray. Position the cooking rack 4 to 6 inches from the heat source.

    Grill or broil the mushrooms on medium heat, turning often, until tender, about 5 minutes on each side. Baste with marinade to keep from drying out. Using tongs, transfer the mushrooms to a plate.

    Place each mushroom on a bun and top with 1 tomato slice, 1 onion slice and 1/2 lettuce leaf. Serve immediately.

    Nutritional analysis per serving
    Serving size: 1 portobello mushroom burger
    Calories 283 Sodium 140 mg
    Total fat 9 g Total carbohydrate 46 g
    Saturated fat 1 g Dietary fiber 9 g
    Monounsaturated fat 5 g Protein 8 g
    Cholesterol 0 mg

    EGGPLANT STEAKS
    Hands-on time: 10 minutes
    Time to table: 20 minutes
    Serves 4

    1 one-pound globe eggplant, stem end trimmed, cut into 1/2 inch slices cross-wise

    SAUCE
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce (oops! I didn't know til just now that I forgot this)
    2 tablespoons thick steak sauce (St. Louisans, I used the great steak sauce from Tucker's Place, mine came from Schnucks but I've seen it elsewhere too)
    1 tablespoon olive oil (optional)
    1 tablespoon honey (if needed, warm it in the microwave for a few seconds to make easier to pour)
    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
    Salt & pepper to taste.

    1/2 ounce of fresh Parmesan, grated

    Mix the sauce. Brush onto both sides of the eggplant slices, arrange on a baking sheet. Place under the broiler until golden brown (the inspiring recipe said 2 minutes, mine took 3). Turn over and repeat. Sprinkle with cheese and put back under the broiler for another minute or two, just until golden. (Watch carefully, Parmesan will turn fast.)

    NUTRITION ESTIMATE
    Made with oil, Per Serving: 110 Cal (35% from Fat, 9% from Protein, 55% from Carb); 3 g Protein; 5 g Tot Fat; 1 g Sat Fat; 3 g Mono Fat; 16 g Carb; 4 g Fiber; NetCarb12; 10 g Sugar; 50 mg Calcium; 1 mg Iron; 206 mg Sodium; 3 mg Cholesterol; Weight Watchers 2 points

    Made without oil, Per Serving: 81 Cal (13% from Fat, 13% from Protein, 74% from Carb); 3 g Protein; 1 g Tot Fat; 1 g Sat Fat; 0 g Mono Fat; 16 g Carb; 4 g Fiber; NetCarb12; 10 g Sugar; 50 mg Calcium; 1 mg Iron; 206 mg Sodium; 3 mg Cholesterol; Weight Watchers 1 point


    This is completely foriegn to me...if an animal doesn't die in my food preparation...I don't what to do.
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  10. #9  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Speaking of healthy...check out this bounty that scheherazade grew in the frozen wasteland of Canada...




    hell, with a little butter and bacon that shit could be great!

    Swear to god...they got snow there today....and I still am running the A/C.


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    We can grow lettuce and other greens year round here. Except in mid-summer you have to protect it like a mother hen or a spitting mother cat from getting fried in the sun or the heat or the desiccating wind - best to plant it under the shade of cucumbers on a climbing frame or somesuch. Even then it's touch and go. Better to have tiny seedling greens inside and scissor them off.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    We also grow pretty fine carrots here in the north and they are one of the most 'user-friendly' veggies all around. No garden cleanup because the horses take care of the tops and trims and they can be eaten fresh or cooked and they make a delicious pie.

    When I am busy working nights, I have been known to forego making the crust. I buy the frozen ones on sale and my preference is the one that uses lard and not shortening. While the crust is thawing, I prepare the filling in my monster size blender but a bowl and hand mixer would also do.

    Preheat oven to 400F

    2 cups cooked carrots
    2 eggs
    2/3 cup sugar
    1 tsp. cinnamon Adjust to taste.
    1 tsp. ginger I use fresh grated ginger when I have it on hand, and add extra.
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 cup milk
    2 tbsp. flour

    Blend until smooth. Pour into thawed pie shell.

    Bake at 400F for 10 minutes then reduce heat to 325F and cook for another 40-45 minutes, depending on your oven.
    Allow to cool completely before serving.



    Add some chopped nuts for extra protein and healthy fats.



    Interestingly, I can gobble this pie down in a day or two and not gain weight. Seems to me it must be just about time to whip up another and I even have cooked carrots frozen ahead, just have to pull them out to thaw while I am working. Tomorrow's project after shift.
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    I'm totally cooking that carrot pie.
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    Me too. But I'd halve the sugar and maybe put the nuts in the mixture before cooking.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Me too. But I'd halve the sugar and maybe put the nuts in the mixture before cooking.
    Oh hell ya...pecan trees are native to Dallas, and I have 4 of them in my yard. Some mixed in pecans would be the bomb.
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    Lordy. Whatever size yard have you got? I thought pecans were huge trees.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  17. #16  
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    Dad looks as though he knew what needed doing.

    Only
    half an acre. Ok. Our block at our old place was a third of an acre and that's pretty big by our standards.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    One of dad's favorite pastimes was collecting and shelling pecans. We always had a huge bag of them in the freezer. That pecan pie reciepe I posted in the OP got used a lot. Boy, you can really tell that photo was taken during the height of the drought...my poor grass is almost non-existant.
    Last edited by MacGyver1968; October 19th, 2012 at 09:16 AM.
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    But at least it looks like grass. I presume you're allowed to water your lawn. Even in a drought?
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Sche....I'm going to try to make your carrot pie today....we used the last store-bought crust, so I'm going to make a few home made. You have any tips on making home made pie crusts? Do you think the pie would be good in a graham cracker crust?
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    But at least it looks like grass. I presume you're allowed to water your lawn. Even in a drought?
    We got to stage 2 water restrictions. Only water once a week with a sprinkler of any type, and only between 5pm- 9am....but you can hand water with a hose as much as you want. My St. Augustine grass is really coming back...it's almost filled in all of the dead spots. (Hank Hill from "King of the Hill" would be proud...he has St. Augustine)

    I showed that google street view shot of our house to mom...we both got a little misty eyed seeing dad out there sweeping.
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    Sprinklers!! A thing of the past here I'm afraid. If you have a watering system installed you're allowed to use it a bit, but not much. But sprinklers attached to hoses are pretty well out of the question.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Sche....I'm going to try to make your carrot pie today....we used the last store-bought crust, so I'm going to make a few home made. You have any tips on making home made pie crusts? Do you think the pie would be good in a graham cracker crust?
    I can't say that I have ever considered going that route Mac. It's very similar to pumpkin pie only nicer in my opinion and by the comments I get. Have you ever seen a pumpkin pie in a graham crust? I haven't come across one.

    As for making pastry, I always used the Tenderflake Lard recipe. It makes enough for three double crust pies and you can freeze the extra dough although in my experience you are better off to roll it out and place it in foil pie plates before freezing as it doesn't roll out quite as nicely after being frozen and thawed in a lump.

    Tenderflake Recipe for Pie Crust Print




    Ingredients

    • 5 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour
    • 2 tsp salt
    • 1 lb (464 g) Tenderflake® lard
    • 1 tbsp vinegar
    • 1 egg, lightly beaten
    • Ice Water


    Instructions

    1. Whisk together flour and salt.
    2. Cut in Tenderflake with pastry blender or 2 knives until the lard is pea sized within the flour.
    3. In a 1 cup measure combine the vinegar and egg.
    4. Add the ice water to make 1 cup.
    5. Gradually stir liquid into Tenderflake mixture, adding only enough liquid to make dough cling together.
    6. Gently gather the dough into a ball and divide into 6 equal portions.
    7. Wrap the portions and refrigerate for 15-30 minutes (if you are using right away) or freeze for future use.
    8. When you are ready to use and the dough has chilled for at least another 15 minutes, roll out each portion on lightly floured surface. If the dough is sticking, chill again for another hour or two. The dough must be cold to be flaky!
    9. Transfer the prepared dough to pie plate.
    10. Trim and flute shells or crusts and bake according to your pie recipe.
    11. Yield: 3 9-inch double crust pies or 6 pie shells.
    Tenderflake Recipe for Pie Crust : Don't Fear It - The Kitchen Magpie
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    Just found this recipe and thought if Mac could make his vegetables look and taste like bacon, so much the better.

    How to cook carrots to taste and look like bacon?


    The recipe:

    1) Plant a shipload of carrots.

    2) Leave the country for two weeks, about a month after they really should have been harvested.

    3) Return home, pull a carrot, and boggle: holy carp, this thing is the size of a baby's arm holding an apple.

    4) Purchase a deep-fryer. (This is actually Step Zero; you should already have purchased a deep fryer.)

    5) Peel the skin off your carrot, and then use extra pressure on the the peeler to slowly slice the meat of the carrot into thin, bacon-like strips.

    6) To remove any vitamins, minerals, and/or lingering taste of carrot, deep-fry in 375-degree canola oil for a minute and a half. Batch size: the thin-sliced flesh of one very large carrot.

    7) Blot gently with paper towel.

    8) Go back in time ten years and marry someone smart enough--this would be Vickie, not me--to suggest sprinkling your deep-fried carrot shavings with truffled salt. Do so.

    9) Try not to just snaffle them all up right there, standing over the sink.

    10) Bask in the approbation of your family and friends, especially the vegan ones. (You might not want to tell the kids they're eating carrots until they've tasted one.)

    How to cook carrots to taste and look like bacon? | Uglyfood.com - the food, the bad and the ugly
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Just found this recipe and thought if Mac could make his vegetables look and taste like bacon, so much the better.

    How to cook carrots to taste and look like bacon?


    The recipe:

    1) Plant a shipload of carrots.

    2) Leave the country for two weeks, about a month after they really should have been harvested.

    3) Return home, pull a carrot, and boggle: holy carp, this thing is the size of a baby's arm holding an apple.

    4) Purchase a deep-fryer. (This is actually Step Zero; you should already have purchased a deep fryer.)

    5) Peel the skin off your carrot, and then use extra pressure on the the peeler to slowly slice the meat of the carrot into thin, bacon-like strips.

    6) To remove any vitamins, minerals, and/or lingering taste of carrot, deep-fry in 375-degree canola oil for a minute and a half. Batch size: the thin-sliced flesh of one very large carrot.

    7) Blot gently with paper towel.

    8) Go back in time ten years and marry someone smart enough--this would be Vickie, not me--to suggest sprinkling your deep-fried carrot shavings with truffled salt. Do so.

    9) Try not to just snaffle them all up right there, standing over the sink.

    10) Bask in the approbation of your family and friends, especially the vegan ones. (You might not want to tell the kids they're eating carrots until they've tasted one.)

    How to cook carrots to taste and look like bacon? | Uglyfood.com - the food, the bad and the ugly

    You are a god!!! You're sure this removes all the vitamins AND minerals?...that healthy crap with kill ya.
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    Sche...I didn't get to make your pie today...I was out of butter and shortening, and didn't have any lard to make the crusts....so I went to the store tonight and bought a couple of pre-made...I try it tomorrow.
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Sche...I didn't get to make your pie today...I was out of butter and shortening, and didn't have any lard to make the crusts....so I went to the store tonight and bought a couple of pre-made...I try it tomorrow.
    Hey Mac, I buy the Tenderflake pie shells when they are on sale since I started working nights and since I shut down the riding lessons seven years ago. I used to bake a lot of treats for my students but now with just the two of us here most often and time at a premium, I find that it's the way to go. It's a home made filling that really sets a pie apart and I can whip up a dinner or dessert pie on short notice as I always have some cooked carrots frozen ahead. At the cost of lard and flour these days, $1.25 per shell seems a good deal to me and I'd rather be riding horses whenever I have the opportunity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    You are a god!!! You're sure this removes all the vitamins AND minerals?...that healthy crap with kill ya.
    Damned if I know. But you keep talking about bacon. Anyway when you get the deep friers out for Thanksgiving turkey this year, I'm sure you could spare a minute and a half to try this recipe and report back to this topic. I have to say that bacon carrots look really good in that picture.
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    Anyway when you get the deep friers out for Thanksgiving turkey this year, .....
    And at this point right here, folks, we realise that there is no real connection between the USA and Australia - despite our almost shared language.

    Australians just don't do this. Turkey is just another chance to fire up the BBQ or the outdoor pizza oven or the envy-of-the-neighbourhood outdoor kitchen. No outdoor cooking facilities? Shove it in the oven at 6 am, go back to bed, check it when you can be bothered to bestir yourself.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Down here (South Africa), Turkey is eaten smoked and barbecued. Well, that's how I eat it anyway. I suppose in my Afrikaner family the most common denominator of family dinners around December holidays is pickled beef tongue and potato salad. My mouth waters just thinking about it.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Anyway when you get the deep friers out for Thanksgiving turkey this year, .....
    And at this point right here, folks, we realize that there is no real connection between the USA and Australia - despite our almost shared language.

    Australians just don't do this. Turkey is just another chance to fire up the BBQ or the outdoor pizza oven or the envy-of-the-neighbourhood outdoor kitchen. No outdoor cooking facilities? Shove it in the oven at 6 am, go back to bed, check it when you can be bothered to bestir yourself.
    Actually most Americans don't deep fry their turkeys either. But deep frying a turkey has been gaining in popularity, especially when large holiday family get to gathers are planned.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post
    Down here (South Africa), Turkey is eaten smoked and barbecued. Well, that's how I eat it anyway. I suppose in my Afrikaner family the most common denominator of family dinners around December holidays is pickled beef tongue and potato salad. My mouth waters just thinking about it.
    I'm not real fond of pickled anything, but I'd love to see a picture of holiday pickled beef tongue if you get the chance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post
    Down here (South Africa), Turkey is eaten smoked and barbecued. Well, that's how I eat it anyway. I suppose in my Afrikaner family the most common denominator of family dinners around December holidays is pickled beef tongue and potato salad. My mouth waters just thinking about it.
    I'm not real fond of pickled anything, but I'd love to see a picture of holiday pickled beef tongue if you get the chance.
    We buy it pickled, boil for a few hours and serve cold in slices (very good and tender served hot as well).

    Here is the wiki on it: Beef tongue - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And a pic: 539843433_b270042115.jpg



    Very tasty indeed, though it doesn't look like much.
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    My repertoire of cooking delights is very limited but I'll share this one with you

    My favorite:

    Remove bag from box
    Tear away cellophane cover
    Unfold bag so it reads "This side up"
    Insert bag into microwave oven
    Set timer for 2 minutes ( there may be an auto button so this step may not be necessary)
    When done remove from oven (careful!!! it's hot)
    Open the one end completely (should already be partially opened)
    Pour contents into bowl or serve from opened bag
    Add melted butter or use the butter flavored variety
    Enjoy popcorn with beer, soda or lemonade (no fruit juices...particularly orange juice...no milk, coffee or tea)
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    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    My repertoire of cooking delights is very limited but I'll share this one with you

    My favorite:

    Remove bag from box
    Tear away cellophane cover
    Unfold bag so it reads "This side up"
    Insert bag into microwave oven
    Set timer for 2 minutes ( there may be an auto button so this step may not be necessary)
    When done remove from oven (careful!!! it's hot)
    Open the one end completely (should already be partially opened)
    Pour contents into bowl or serve from opened bag
    Add melted butter or use the butter flavored variety
    Enjoy popcorn with beer, soda or lemonade (no fruit juices...particularly orange juice...no milk, coffee or tea)
    I like Orville Redenbacher's "Movie Theater Butter" microwave popcorn and as an old guy living alone 2/3's of my cooking involves a microwave. But I have many fond memories of past holiday get to gathers and eating to much food.
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    Well...one goal of this thread is to inspire all of the microwave cooks into trying something a little different.

    Kalster...I'm not sure if I want to taste something that tastes me back!

    As for deep-fried turkey...once you try it, you'll never go back to smoking or oven roasting. It's so juicy, with a nice crisp skin. Plus it only takes 45 minutes.
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    My favorite pie, when Concord grapes are available.

    Concord Grape Pie I
    Ingredients
    1 recipe pastry for a 9 inch double crust pie
    5 cups Concord grapes
    1 1/4 cups white sugar
    1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1 pinch salt
    3/4 teaspoon lemon juice
    1 1/2 tablespoons butter
    Directions
    1. Wash grapes, and remove the skins. Save the skins. Place grape pulp in a large saucepan; mash a few at the bottom to release their juice. Cook over medium low heat until grapes come to a full boil. Remove pulp from heat, and press through a food mill to remove seeds. Combine pulp and skins in a large bowl. Stir in lemon juice.
    2. In a separate bowl, mix sugar, flour, and salt. Stir into grape mixture. Pour filling into pastry crust, and dot with butter or margarine. Cover with second pastry shell. Flute edges, and cut little slits in the top crust for steam to escape.
    3. Bake at 400 degrees F (205 degrees C) for 45 to 50 minutes, or until crust is brown and juice begins to bubble through slits in top crust. Cool.




    This was a big hit at the latest family get-together. My sister made it.

    Blonde Lasagna with Chicken, Cheese and Mushrooms

    If you strip the chicken, chop the skin, grate the cheeses and slice the mushrooms ahead, the dish goes
    together quickly. Use dry vermouth if you don't want to open a bottle of white wine.

    -- Marlene Parrish
    •10 ounces mushrooms (white or brown, wild or mixed), thinly sliced
    •3 cloves garlic, minced
    •Salt and black pepper
    •1 tablespoon olive oil
    •5 tablespoons unsalted butter, separated

    •1/2 cup dry white wine
    •1/2 rotisserie chicken, meat shredded to make 2 1/2 cups
    •Rotisserie pan juices
    •Chicken skin, chopped (optional, but delicious)
    •3 1/2 cups whole milk
    •1/4 cup flour
    •2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
    •3/4 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
    •12 no-boil egg lasagna noodles, preferably Barilla
    •1 1/2 cups coarsely grated Gruyere cheese

    Preheat oven to 450 degrees with the rack in the middle. Spritz an 8-by-10-inch oblong baking pan with
    non-stick cooking spray. (A deep 9-by-9-inch pan can work, too.)

    Cook mushrooms, garlic, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper in olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter
    in a 4-quart heavy saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally until mushrooms are softened, about 3
    minutes. Add wine and simmer briskly for 2 minutes. Transfer mushroom mixture to a large bowl and stir in
    the chicken, juices and skin (if using). Set aside saucepan; you'll use it again.

    Bring milk to a bare simmer in a medium saucepan. Melt remaining 4 tablespoons butter in the 4-quart
    saucepan over medium-low heat. Add flour and cook the butter-flour mixture, whisking constantly, about 3
    minutes. Add hot milk in a fast stream, whisking constantly. Add the thyme, 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2
    teaspoon pepper and simmer, whisking occasionally, until thickened, 5 to 6 minutes.

    Remove from heat, and reserve 1 cup sauce. Stir Parmigiano-Reggiano into remaining sauce in pan, then
    stir into mushroom filling.

    Spread half of reserved plain sauce in baking pan to coat bottom. Add 3 lasagna sheets, overlapping
    slightly, and 1/3 of mushroom filling, spreading evenly, then sprinkle 1/4 of Gruyere over top. Repeat
    sheets and filling 2 more times. Top with remaining 3 lasagna sheets and remaining plain sauce, spreading
    evenly. Sprinkle top with remaining Gruyere.

    Spritz a long sheet of aluminum foil with baking spray oil. Cover the lasagna with the foil, tenting a
    bit to prevent foil from touching top of lasagna (it wants to stick) but sealing all around the edge, and
    bake 30 minutes

    Carefully remove foil and bake until cheese topping is golden, about 12 to 15 minutes more. Let lasagna
    stand 10 minutes before serving. Serves 6.

    -- "Gourmet Weekday" (Conde-Nast, May 2012, $20)

    Read more: Roasting at 450 has plenty of advantages - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
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    Hmmm....I like pasta dishes that use white sauces instead of red. That looks like a winner.
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    damn! I never thought of a pumpkin burger before. Yum

    Burger King Japan Adds Pumpkin Burger to Menu



    The popularity of pumpkin during the fall is undeniable, and restaurants and chains alike have been known to capitalize on customer's seasonal craving by serving up a variety of pumpkin-flavored items. Burger King Japan is taking the autumnal pumpkin craze a step further by pairing the trendy gourd with beef.

    According to Brand Eating, Burger King Japan is now offering the BK Pumpkin Burger. The burger features two slices of kabocha (Japanese pumpkin), bacon, lettuce, BK's signature beef patty, and nut sauce. The buns were specially made for the new burger, and are reportedly shaped like pumpkins.

    If the normal amount of pumpkin just isn't enough, Burger King customers can opt for the "pumpkin bomb," which gives customers a whopping 10 slices of pumpkin on their burger. Just in case the BK Pumpkin Burger doesn't sound appealing — for reasons other than the pumpkin — BK is allowing kabocha as an additional topping on any of its burgers.
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    Does anyone know a reciepe for buffelo wing sauce?
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Does anyone know a reciepe for buffelo wing sauce?
    Can't say as I do, but where I work, the commercial variety is in aisle 2, left side, twenty two feet along and the third shelf from the top, about 48 inches as measured from the floor up, 5 selections to choose from.
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    Well there's this one. I haven't tried it - not fond of either wings or drumsticks.
    Spicy Buffalo Mini Drumsticks recipe - Best Recipes

    Let's you make it as mild or as hot as you like. Personally, I'd chop a couple of fresh chillies in this - then add tabasco if they turned out not as hot as we want. And I'd certainly oven or BBQ bake the chicken rather than deep fry it, but I'm not American.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Well there's this one. I haven't tried it - not fond of either wings or drumsticks.
    Spicy Buffalo Mini Drumsticks recipe - Best Recipes

    Let's you make it as mild or as hot as you like. Personally, I'd chop a couple of fresh chillies in this - then add tabasco if they turned out not as hot as we want. And I'd certainly oven or BBQ bake the chicken rather than deep fry it, but I'm not American.
    Most of us Americans like our chicken anyway it's cooked. You know variety is the spice of life. Have you tried chicken pizza yet?
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    Chicken yes. Tandoori chicken no. There are limits to 'fusion' cuisine that ought not be crossed.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Well there's this one. I haven't tried it - not fond of either wings or drumsticks.
    Spicy Buffalo Mini Drumsticks recipe - Best Recipes

    Let's you make it as mild or as hot as you like. Personally, I'd chop a couple of fresh chillies in this - then add tabasco if they turned out not as hot as we want. And I'd certainly oven or BBQ bake the chicken rather than deep fry it, but I'm not American.
    Thanks Adelady....Chicken wings were on sale at the store...so I wanted to try to make my own Buffalo wings. I still haven't cooked Sche's carrot pie, even though I have the crust. I've been suffering from a duel whammy...a cold plus poison ivy on my face. God, it sucks.
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    Well, you lot might wail and moan about our spiders and snakes, but we don't have anything like poison ivy.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    The classic recipe is just equal parts butter and Frank's Louisiana hot sauce.

    The worst case of poison ivy I ever had, I got in the winter time from sawing up firewood that had poison ivy vines climbing up the tree trunk. My eyes were almost swollen shut. God, that was awful.
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    This was one of my favorite dishes I came up with myself. I'm so sad I can no longer eat it due to a gluten intolerance.



    The War Has Only Vegan!: (Better than) Meatballs Recipe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boycott Factory Farms View Post
    This was one of my favorite dishes I came up with myself. I'm so sad I can no longer eat it due to a gluten intolerance.

    The War Has Only Vegan!: (Better than) Meatballs Recipe
    Welcome to the forum. I'm still laughing over your ID. It's good to get that first laugh of the day early. I haven't really heard about gluten intolerance before. Can you please describe it and how you became aware that you had it?

    As far as poison ivy goes, it doesn't seem to effect all people the same. I've been exposed and never got the rash of blisters. My dad however wasn't so lucky. Once he got the rash it would keep spreading when the little blisters would break. If even the smallest amount got on his clothing, he would get it again if that piece of clothing wasn't cleaned before he wore it again. But I hardly think that compares to all those poison little beasties crawling or swimming around Australia.
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    Nice plating skills there BFF. Welcome to the forum, and welcome to the food thread.

    As far as poison ivy goes, it doesn't seem to effect all people the same. I've been exposed and never got the rash of blisters. My dad however wasn't so lucky. Once he got the rash it would keep spreading when the little blisters would break. If even the smallest amount got on his clothing, he would get it again if that piece of clothing wasn't cleaned before he wore it again. But I hardly think that compares to all those poison little beasties crawling or swimming around Australia.
    This is what's happening to me. It started as small spot on my cheek, then spread to my chin, eyes, inside my nose, behind one ear, and in the cracks of my mouth. Fortunately it's all dried up now, so the spreading stopped.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Nice plating skills there BFF. Welcome to the forum, and welcome to the food thread.

    As far as poison ivy goes, it doesn't seem to effect all people the same. I've been exposed and never got the rash of blisters. My dad however wasn't so lucky. Once he got the rash it would keep spreading when the little blisters would break. If even the smallest amount got on his clothing, he would get it again if that piece of clothing wasn't cleaned before he wore it again. But I hardly think that compares to all those poison little beasties crawling or swimming around Australia.
    This is what's happening to me. It started as small spot on my cheek, then spread to my chin, eyes, inside my nose, behind one ear, and in the cracks of my mouth. Fortunately it's all dried up now, so the spreading stopped.
    I'm not sure what my dad used to put on it, but it stained the skin very dark. From what you said it doesn't seem to affect your hands, because how else could it get to all those other places from the starting place? Anyway I'm glad I'm not sensitive to it, but I wouldn't temp fate by rubbing it on myself. A lot of people that seem to get it for no reason probably have pets that get it on them then bring it home.
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    I found a bottle of Calimine lotion in my dad's bathroom. I used it for a couple of days...then noticed the expiration date on the bottom....1/88 ! Reagan was still in office when this shit was made! So I went and bought a new bottle.

    Thanks Harold for the buffalo sauce recipe...I'll try that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I found a bottle of Calimine lotion in my dad's bathroom. I used it for a couple of days...then noticed the expiration date on the bottom....1/88 ! Reagan was still in office when this shit was made! So I went and bought a new bottle.

    Thanks Harold for the buffalo sauce recipe...I'll try that.
    In all my years I've had a lot of different types of buffalo wings and the ones I liked best were dry to the touch and crisp when you bit into them. I was never sure how this was done, but they tasted great and weren't messy to handle.
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    I'm trying to replicate the wings at Hooters. Breaded first, then sauce with medium heat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'm trying to replicate the wings at Hooters. Breaded first, then sauce with medium heat.
    This is called "restaurant style" but I think the restaurant they are referring to is Hooters.
    Restaurant-Style Buffalo Chicken Wings Recipe - Allrecipes.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'm trying to replicate the wings at Hooters. Breaded first, then sauce with medium heat.
    This is called "restaurant style" but I think the restaurant they are referring to is Hooters.
    Restaurant-Style Buffalo Chicken Wings Recipe - Allrecipes.com
    That looks like a good recipe to me. One of the commenters added a baking method to that recipe that I liked as well.

    Oh yeah! I love these and they're really easy to make at home. I decided to bake them instead of fry them so they didn't taste just like Hooters but they were still great and much better for you. I followed the instructions exact except I baked on a rack set over a jelly roll pan at 350 for 45 minutes. Then I turned the oven to 375 and sprayed the wings with Pam and let them bake 5 more minutes so they got crispy. Excellent and you'll never miss the deep fried taste!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'm trying to replicate the wings at Hooters. Breaded first, then sauce with medium heat.
    This is called "restaurant style" but I think the restaurant they are referring to is Hooters.
    Restaurant-Style Buffalo Chicken Wings Recipe - Allrecipes.com
    I'm going with this recipe. I take some pics as I make them tonight.
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    I didn't notice this thread before. I love cooking. I'll share a few pics of some things I like to make most.

    Cottage pie (my favorite winter dish to make):




    Enchilladas (always made them after snowboarding for 10 hours on Hood):




    Strawberry lemon crepes (wife's favorite):


    I've got my own little family cookbook I put together with all my recipes. I think it's a great thing to make for the kids some day. Learning how to cook for yourself seems to be a dying skill.
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    Flick Montana

    Cottage pie, Could you provide more detail about it? Never heard of it before.
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    Welcome Flick!!! Hurray for more cooks! That means more recipe ideas for me!

    My buffalo wings turned out great last night...I was very pleased with myself.








    It has become a tradition in my house for me to cook what I call "Atheist Sunday Lunch". Sunday lunch after church is sorta of big deal here in the south. While all of the Christians go to church, I say home and cook and watch the Cowboys. Today, I'm making another pork loin...the ones I made in the past were just pieces of pork loin...this one is an entire log...so instead of cooking it in the crock pot, I'm going with the oven instead. I'll try to post photos.
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    The wings look good. Were they just like Hooters'?
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    Better. Thanks for the recipe.
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    My pork loin:




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  65. #64  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Flick Montana

    Cottage pie, Could you provide more detail about it? Never heard of it before.
    It's a shepherd's pie with beef instead of lamb. Basically, it's just meat and veg with whipped potatoes on top. Really simple, really hearty.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Flick Montana

    Cottage pie, Could you provide more detail about it? Never heard of it before.
    It's a shepherd's pie with beef instead of lamb. Basically, it's just meat and veg with whipped potatoes on top. Really simple, really hearty.
    Since I'm not very fond of lamb, that change sounds very good to me. I've had ground beef and mashed potato pie before and that was very good.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post

    It has become a tradition in my house for me to cook what I call "Atheist Sunday Lunch". Sunday lunch after church is sorta of big deal here in the south. While all of the Christians go to church, I say home and cook and watch the Cowboys. Today, I'm making another pork loin...the ones I made in the past were just pieces of pork loin...this one is an entire log...so instead of cooking it in the crock pot, I'm going with the oven instead. I'll try to post photos.
    "Atheist Sunday Lunch"-haha!

    I love making pork belly. None of my dishes have precise recipes though. I kind of go by feel every time.

    I cut the top of the skin open in cubes. Then I make a nice marinade out of some Worcester sauce, spice, salt, apricot jam, vinegar, water, and if I have some tomato chutney, I'll throw some of that in there as well, making around 600ml or so. After it has marinated for a day or so, I'll put it in a baking pan surrounded by skinned potatoes. I'll then shop some onion and tomato and sprinkle it in between the potatoes and pour the marinade over the pork belly and on the tomato and onions. Then I'll drip some oil on each potato and sprinkle some potato spice on there. Then cover the pan with tin foil and bake in 180oC oven for an hour or so, remove the foil and then bake until the potatoes and skin is crispy. I'll then use the sauce on some mixed vegetables and rice. You can lower the heat and have it cook for longer before letting it grill to make it even more tender.

    Essentially, it should come out as sweet and sour pork, but I like it more sweet than sour. Like a puppy, I'll probably eat until my stomach explodes if you put down enough in front of me.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Boycott Factory Farms View Post
    This was one of my favorite dishes I came up with myself. I'm so sad I can no longer eat it due to a gluten intolerance.

    The War Has Only Vegan!: (Better than) Meatballs Recipe
    Welcome to the forum. I'm still laughing over your ID. It's good to get that first laugh of the day early. I haven't really heard about gluten intolerance before. Can you please describe it and how you became aware that you had it?

    As far as poison ivy goes, it doesn't seem to effect all people the same. I've been exposed and never got the rash of blisters. My dad however wasn't so lucky. Once he got the rash it would keep spreading when the little blisters would break. If even the smallest amount got on his clothing, he would get it again if that piece of clothing wasn't cleaned before he wore it again. But I hardly think that compares to all those poison little beasties crawling or swimming around Australia.
    Thank you.

    I first became aware that I had it when I realized every time I ate faux meat products with high concentrations of gluten in them, especially seitan, I got really sick. I fell asleep pretty much immediately and would be out the rest of the day, and I once ate a Tofurky sandwich at work and was very loopy the rest of the day. Embarrassingly loopy. I get dizzy and I swell up and sweat a lot. It's not very pretty. Then I could be imagining this, but it seems like the days I eat gluten, my joints are stiff, and the days I don't I feel much better. Maybe because of the inflammation it causes for me.

    I feel kind of weird because I've lived in California all my life and have been hiking a lot, but I think I must just never have come across poison ivy. Or maybe like you I'm immune to it. Ha.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Nice plating skills there BFF. Welcome to the forum, and welcome to the food thread.
    Thanks. I tried to cover up the fact that I left the spaghetti out too long I guess by going out to my back yard and grabbing some mint leaves. :P
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  70. #69  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boycott Factory Farms View Post
    I first became aware that I had it when I realized every time I ate faux meat products with high concentrations of gluten in them, especially seitan, I got really sick. I fell asleep pretty much immediately and would be out the rest of the day, and I once ate a Tofurky sandwich at work and was very loopy the rest of the day. Embarrassingly loopy. I get dizzy and I swell up and sweat a lot. It's not very pretty. Then I could be imagining this, but it seems like the days I eat gluten, my joints are stiff, and the days I don't I feel much better. Maybe because of the inflammation it causes for me.

    I feel kind of weird because I've lived in California all my life and have been hiking a lot, but I think I must just never have come across poison ivy. Or maybe like you I'm immune to it. Ha.
    I didn't realize gluten could be such a problem. I found the following link that has everything you ever wanted to know about gluten.
    Thanks for calling my attention to it.

    gluten-intolerance-symptoms
    Gluten Intolerance Symptoms
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Boycott Factory Farms View Post
    I first became aware that I had it when I realized every time I ate faux meat products with high concentrations of gluten in them, especially seitan, I got really sick. I fell asleep pretty much immediately and would be out the rest of the day, and I once ate a Tofurky sandwich at work and was very loopy the rest of the day. Embarrassingly loopy. I get dizzy and I swell up and sweat a lot. It's not very pretty. Then I could be imagining this, but it seems like the days I eat gluten, my joints are stiff, and the days I don't I feel much better. Maybe because of the inflammation it causes for me.

    I feel kind of weird because I've lived in California all my life and have been hiking a lot, but I think I must just never have come across poison ivy. Or maybe like you I'm immune to it. Ha.
    I didn't realize gluten could be such a problem. I found the following link that has everything you ever wanted to know about gluten.
    Thanks for calling my attention to it.

    gluten-intolerance-symptoms
    Gluten Intolerance Symptoms
    Wow, I did learn a lot from that just from skimming through a bit. And thank you for that link. It just reminded me another more recent symptom is, whenever I eat gluten I spontaneously vomit afterward. (Not a lot though, so I'm able to catch it in my mouth instead of spewing it everywhere.)

    I guess I should look more into it. What I also found really interesting is I'm pretty sure I have Asperger's, and it says, "One condition with a controversial connection to gluten intolerance is Autism. Many people feel a gluten-free, casein-free diet (often abbreviated as GFCS diet) helps reduce the manifestations of autism or Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). Some people strongly believe autism itself should be counted among the many signs of gluten intolerance." I wonder also about the casein influence, since I did note a dramatic increase in mental clarity when I went vegan. Worth looking into. Though I actually don't know if I want to be Asperger's-free. I kind of like thinking differently from others.
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    Interesting observation regarding Asperger's.

    Is Asperger's a deviation from the presently accepted 'normal' (whatever that is) or is it an evolutionary pathway in response to our manipulation of the environment and our nutritional sources?

    Is there a correlation or a causation being demonstrated by the apparent increase in persons with varying degrees of Asperger's?

    Is Asperger's a problem or a potential solution precisely because people who have this 'aspect' are capable of thinking 'outside the box'?

    No attempt to derail this thread on cooking and I observe that what we cook and eat 'may' be a factor. Here's a food picture to stay on topic. My brunch of a couple days ago. Spinach, with a 'dressing' of pureed apricot and plain yogurt, topped with sliced red grapes, pecans and flax seed.
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  73. #72  
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    Needs bacon.

    J/k...that looks delicious.

    (BFF, I hope you don't take offense to my meat-centric posts....but I'm one hard-core meat eating mother f$#ker... but I would like to hear a few recipes from you, in case I need to cook for a vegan.)
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    I eat a sufficient amount of animal protein myself, MacGyver and 'Need's Bacon' is your stock reply, lol. Actually, I am beginning to wonder if you get an incentive from the Pork Growers Association for each time you mention the word 'bacon'?

    Here's a pic of one of my easy, standby meals of oven roasted chicken thighs and sweet potatoes. Adding bacon bits is always optional.

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  75. #74  
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    Hmmm...I'm a dark meat kinda guy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Hmmm...I'm a dark meat kinda guy.
    Chicken thighs are considered 'dark' meat.

    Poultry
    Within poultry, there are two types of meats—white and dark. The different colors are based on the different locations and uses of the muscles. Dark meats occur in the legs, which are used to support the weight of the animals while they move. These muscles are designed to develop endurance for long-term use and contain a large amount of myoglobin, allowing the muscle to use oxygen more efficiently for aerobic respiration. In contrast the white meat, generally found within the breasts of the birds, are used for quick bursts of power which requires little of the meat-darkening myoglobin. Note that this holds for ground-based birds like chicken and turkeys – birds which use their chest muscles for sustained flight (such as geese and ducks) have dark meat throughout their bodies.[4] Dark meat contains 2.64 times more saturated fat than white meat, per gram of protein.[5] One commentator has pointed out that dark meat contains more vitamins.[6]
    Pork

    Given nutritional concerns, meat producers are eager to have their products considered as "white", and the United States National Pork Board has positioned their product as "Pork. The Other White Meat", alongside poultry and fish; however, meats which are red when raw and turn white on cooking, like pork, are sometimes categorized by the United States Department of Agriculture as red meats.[2] This categorization is controversial as some types of fish, such as tuna, are red when raw and turn white when cooked; similarly, certain types of poultry that are sometimes grouped as "white meat" are actually "red" when raw, such as duck and goose. The debate is mainly one of semantics as nutritionists consider all meat from mammals to be "red meat" while this is not the case in other fields such as husbandry, biology, genetics, physiology, etc.
    White meat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    About the only thing I make that you might enjoy is rib eye steak and damned if I'm taking time to take pictures of that when I cook it. I don't answer the phone either when I've managed to attain the desired rare/medium standard that personally pleases me. Note that I did not state it medium/rare for that is a tad too close to well done.... Consider yourself 'roasted' by Schez, lol...
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  77. #76  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Hmmm...I'm a dark meat kinda guy.
    Chicken thighs are considered 'dark' meat.

    Poultry
    Within poultry, there are two types of meats—white and dark. The different colors are based on the different locations and uses of the muscles. Dark meats occur in the legs, which are used to support the weight of the animals while they move. These muscles are designed to develop endurance for long-term use and contain a large amount of myoglobin, allowing the muscle to use oxygen more efficiently for aerobic respiration. In contrast the white meat, generally found within the breasts of the birds, are used for quick bursts of power which requires little of the meat-darkening myoglobin. Note that this holds for ground-based birds like chicken and turkeys – birds which use their chest muscles for sustained flight (such as geese and ducks) have dark meat throughout their bodies.[4] Dark meat contains 2.64 times more saturated fat than white meat, per gram of protein.[5] One commentator has pointed out that dark meat contains more vitamins.[6]
    Pork

    Given nutritional concerns, meat producers are eager to have their products considered as "white", and the United States National Pork Board has positioned their product as "Pork. The Other White Meat", alongside poultry and fish; however, meats which are red when raw and turn white on cooking, like pork, are sometimes categorized by the United States Department of Agriculture as red meats.[2] This categorization is controversial as some types of fish, such as tuna, are red when raw and turn white when cooked; similarly, certain types of poultry that are sometimes grouped as "white meat" are actually "red" when raw, such as duck and goose. The debate is mainly one of semantics as nutritionists consider all meat from mammals to be "red meat" while this is not the case in other fields such as husbandry, biology, genetics, physiology, etc.
    White meat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    About the only thing I make that you might enjoy is rib eye steak and damned if I'm taking time to take pictures of that when I cook it. I don't answer the phone either when I've managed to attain the desired rare/medium standard that personally pleases me. Note that I did not state it medium/rare for that is a tad too close to well done.... Consider yourself 'roasted' by Schez, lol...

    That was a Hmmm...as in the yummy sound. Thighs are my favorite part. I'm having roasted chicken tonight too...except it's store bought. I'm pouring some of my left over buffalo sauce on it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Needs bacon.
    Here ya go.
    Bacon Explosion: The BBQ Sausage Recipe of all Recipes - BBQ Addicts - BBQ Blog
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    Good grief. Harold! You really shouldn't encourage these people.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    When it comes to bacon, I'm incorrigible.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    You might be surprised to learn that some people really, really try to avoid it. I'm one of them. Why? That ghastly stink.

    If you could guarantee me that every piece of pork, every slice of bacon I ever see for the rest of my life would be from sows, I'd be there in a flash. Apparently it's a hormone sensitivity. About 5% of women and 1% of men have it. To me it smells rancid. I've even sent back "off" tasting steak at grill bars - beautiful meat, perfectly cooked - on a grill plate that cooked bacon just before.

    The worst one I ever came across was a male friend of ours. He had to keep turning down offers of free or cheap meat from his employer - at the time he managed part of the biggest piggery in Australia. He was one of the 1%.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    I've made this - pig candy. Tasty.
    Bacon - Pig Candy - The Virtual Weber Bullet
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    You might be surprised to learn that some people really, really try to avoid it. I'm one of them. Why? That ghastly stink.

    If you could guarantee me that every piece of pork, every slice of bacon I ever see for the rest of my life would be from sows, I'd be there in a flash. Apparently it's a hormone sensitivity. About 5% of women and 1% of men have it. To me it smells rancid. I've even sent back "off" tasting steak at grill bars - beautiful meat, perfectly cooked - on a grill plate that cooked bacon just before.

    The worst one I ever came across was a male friend of ours. He had to keep turning down offers of free or cheap meat from his employer - at the time he managed part of the biggest piggery in Australia. He was one of the 1%.
    My sincerest condolences my friend. We should forget about these pink ribbons for breast cancer, and start a campaign to defeat this horrid, tragic disease...we can all wear bacon ribbons. I propose this forum organizes a worldwide "walk for pork" to raise awareness.
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  84. #83  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Needs bacon.
    Here ya go.
    Bacon Explosion: The BBQ Sausage Recipe of all Recipes - BBQ Addicts - BBQ Blog
    Pork Nirvana indeed! One of those might satisfy my bacon cravings for about a year. <Just kidding> I have to say that after seeing that treat I'll never forget it. I bet you could open a specialty restaurant selling that and make good money.

    Thanks Harold
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Hmmm...I'm a dark meat kinda guy.
    Chicken thighs are considered 'dark' meat.

    White meat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    About the only thing I make that you might enjoy is rib eye steak and damned if I'm taking time to take pictures of that when I cook it. I don't answer the phone either when I've managed to attain the desired rare/medium standard that personally pleases me. Note that I did not state it medium/rare for that is a tad too close to well done.... Consider yourself 'roasted' by Schez, lol...
    I like it all dark or white, fowl or fish, pork or beef, but not fond of organs of any kind.
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  86. #85  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Needs bacon.
    Here ya go.
    Bacon Explosion: The BBQ Sausage Recipe of all Recipes - BBQ Addicts - BBQ Blog
    Bacon burger with out the beef


    My attempt to compete with the Bacon Explosion.
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    Chicken & Beef Fajitas

    Ingredients:

    Marinade:

    1/4 cup olive oil
    1 teaspoon grated lime rind
    2 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
    1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1 (14.25-ounce) can low-salt beef broth

    Fajitas:

    1 (1-pound) flank steak
    1 pound skinned, boned chicken breast
    2 red bell peppers, each cut into 12 wedges
    2 green bell peppers, each cut into 12 wedges
    1 large Vidalia or other sweet onion, cut into 16 wedges
    Cooking spray
    16 (6-inch) fat-free flour tortillas
    1 cup bottled salsa
    1/4 cup low-fat sour cream
    1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    Fresh cilantro sprigs

    To prepare marinade, combine first 10 ingredients in a large bowl.
    To prepare fajitas, trim fat from steak. Score a diamond pattern on both sides of the steak. Combine 1 1/2 cups marinade, steak, and chicken in a large zip-top plastic bag. Seal and marinate in refrigerator 4 hours or overnight, turning occasionally. Combine remaining marinade, bell peppers, and onion in a zip-top plastic bag. Seal and marinate in refrigerator for 4 hours or overnight, turning occasionally.

    Prepare grill, remove steak and chicken from bag; discard marinade. Remove vegetables from bag, reserve marinade. Place reserved marinade in a small saucepan, set aside. Place steak, chicken, and vegetables on grill rack coated with cooking spray, cook 8 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness.

    Wrap tortillas tightly in foil, place tortilla packet on grill rack the last 2 minutes of grilling time. Bring reserved marinade to a boil. Cut steak and chicken diagonally across the grain into thin slices. Place the steak, chicken, and vegetables on a serving platter, drizzle with reserved marinade.

    Arrange about 1 ounce steak, about 1 ounce chicken, 3 bell pepper wedges, and 1 onion wedge in a tortilla, top with 1 tablespoon salsa, about 1 teaspoon sour cream, and 1/2 tablespoon cilantro. Fold the sides of tortilla over filling.

    Attachment 1211
    Last edited by Ascended; October 31st, 2012 at 12:58 PM. Reason: tried to add picture
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Chicken & Beef Fajitas

    Ingredients:

    Marinade:

    1/4 cup olive oil
    1 teaspoon grated lime rind
    2 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
    1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1 (14.25-ounce) can low-salt beef broth

    Fajitas:

    1 (1-pound) flank steak
    1 pound skinned, boned chicken breast
    2 red bell peppers, each cut into 12 wedges
    2 green bell peppers, each cut into 12 wedges
    1 large Vidalia or other sweet onion, cut into 16 wedges
    Cooking spray
    16 (6-inch) fat-free flour tortillas
    1 cup bottled salsa
    1/4 cup low-fat sour cream
    1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    Fresh cilantro sprigs

    To prepare marinade, combine first 10 ingredients in a large bowl.
    To prepare fajitas, trim fat from steak. Score a diamond pattern on both sides of the steak. Combine 1 1/2 cups marinade, steak, and chicken in a large zip-top plastic bag. Seal and marinate in refrigerator 4 hours or overnight, turning occasionally. Combine remaining marinade, bell peppers, and onion in a zip-top plastic bag. Seal and marinate in refrigerator for 4 hours or overnight, turning occasionally.

    Prepare grill, remove steak and chicken from bag; discard marinade. Remove vegetables from bag, reserve marinade. Place reserved marinade in a small saucepan, set aside. Place steak, chicken, and vegetables on grill rack coated with cooking spray, cook 8 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness.

    Wrap tortillas tightly in foil, place tortilla packet on grill rack the last 2 minutes of grilling time. Bring reserved marinade to a boil. Cut steak and chicken diagonally across the grain into thin slices. Place the steak, chicken, and vegetables on a serving platter, drizzle with reserved marinade.

    Arrange about 1 ounce steak, about 1 ounce chicken, 3 bell pepper wedges, and 1 onion wedge in a tortilla, top with 1 tablespoon salsa, about 1 teaspoon sour cream, and 1/2 tablespoon cilantro. Fold the sides of tortilla over filling.

    Attachment 1211
    Perhaps not the exact image you had in mind Chrisgorlitz, but it looks pretty good to me!

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  89. #88  
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    A member made a derogatory comment about people that didn't like spaghetti and for some reason I wondered if there was such a thing as bacon spaghetti and praise the fantasy God.


    From: Bacon Spaghetti

    My kids declared this bacon spaghetti one of the best meals that I have made and I have to agree, this spaghetti was really good.

    But, how could it be bad when it contains a pound of bacon? Anything with a pound of bacon in it has to be good, doesn’t it?!

    As soon as I saw this recipe in one of my pork cookbooks, I knew I had to try it. We love spaghetti and we love bacon, so I knew combining the two would make a perfect meal.

    This is basically a version of a baked spaghetti, but the bacon in it makes it a little different. It also contains very little cheese compared to many baked spaghetti recipes, but the amount of bacon in it, makes up for the lack of cheese.

    I think the combination of pasta, sauce, bacon, and cheese is perfect in this.

    If you like bacon, you need to try this. Seriously, this is really that good.


    Bacon Spaghetti

    8 ounce spaghetti noodles ( I used gluten free)
    1 lb bacon, cut into pieces
    1 onion, chopped
    1 green pepper, chopped
    2 -14 ounce cans diced tomatoes
    1 teaspoon oregano
    1 teaspoon paprika
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/8 teaspoon pepper
    1 cup grated Parmesan cheese ( I use the real stuff, not the stuff from the green can.)

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    Bring a pot of water to a boil. Cook pasta in water until tender, about 10-12 minutes. Drain the pasta and set aside.
    While pasta is cooking, fry the bacon until browned and cooked completely.
    Drain bacon, reserving a few tablespoons of grease.
    Cook onion and pepper in reserved bacon grease until tender and lightly browned.
    In a large bowl combine bacon, cooked onion and pepper mixture, tomatoes, and spices. Add cooked spaghetti noodles and mix together well.
    Spread into a greased 9×13 pan or other similar casserole dish.
    Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.
    Bake for 40-45 minutes or until heated.

    Below pictures found on a bacon spaghetti search. Surprisingly popular meal.

    bacon spaghetti - Bing Images
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  90. #89  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    You do find some interesting recipes, Arkane, I will grant you that.
    Using Gluten free pasta seems unnecessary considering the amount of fat from the bacon but that is just my own opinion. While it would be interesting to sample a mouthful or two, I can't envision making this recipe myself but I'm thinking that Mac might give it a go and give us his observations and tasting notes.
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  91. #90  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    You do find some interesting recipes, Arkane, I will grant you that.
    Using Gluten free pasta seems unnecessary considering the amount of fat from the bacon but that is just my own opinion. While it would be interesting to sample a mouthful or two, I can't envision making this recipe myself but I'm thinking that Mac might give it a go and give us his observations and tasting notes.
    In my fairly long life I can't remember ever eating anything with bacon in it that I didn't like, so yes Mac and I do have at least one thing in common.
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  92. #91  
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    Ascended likes this.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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  93. #92  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post
    Maybe I spoke to soon, but as gross as that sounds, you never know until you try it.
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  94. #93  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Okay. I know that this is a recipe thread but you have to acknowledge that the creators of the following commercially available products came up with some interesting recipes, even if they aren't offering to share their proprietory secrets. This should be an inspiration to all of you bacon 'addicts', lol....







    Bacon appears to rule on this thread, lol...
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  95. #94  
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    I meant to try the Burger King bacon sundae, but never got around to it.
    So Good: Review: Burger King Bacon Sundae
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  96. #95  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Sweet sweet bacon...thank you my friends. The bacon gods are pleased.

    My best friend asked me to come over and epoxy coat his garage floor. His Chinese girlfriend brought home absolutely the best Peking duck I've ever had. I really loved it. I've never really eaten much duck...but I love dark meat. I think I may have to give it a try in the kitchen.

    Edit:

    Before:


    After:

    Last edited by MacGyver1968; November 5th, 2012 at 10:27 PM.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  97. #96  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    This being a Science Forum and this being a thread on the science of cooking, I thought that the following Periodic Table Of Meat might be an item of interest to viewers.

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  98. #97  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    A few more exotic bacon products for the adventurous.









    100 Most Creative Bacon Products Ever ~ Damn Cool Pictures
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  99. #98  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Sweet sweet bacon...thank you my friends. The bacon gods are pleased.

    My best friend asked me to come over and epoxy coat his garage floor. His Chinese girlfriend brought home absolutely the best Peking duck I've ever had. I really loved it. I've never really eaten much duck...but I love dark meat. I think I may have to give it a try in the kitchen.
    Instead of an all turkey Thanksgiving deep fry a duck. Might be a good way to do duck. I've heard duck meat tends to be a bit greasy but don't really know because I've had Peking duck before and it was very good and I didn't notice greasy at all.
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  100. #99  
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    Duck is notoriously fatty. One of the reasons a lot of people like roasting them is to collect the fat to roast potatoes for the next umpty weeks/months. Always use a sizeable trivet or other rack to keep the bird up out of the accumulating fat in the roasting dish. There's always enough fat left in the meat to keep it succulent - even too rich for many people's tastes.

    The Chinese method of roasting duck is like all the other better methods - ensuring the fat runs away from the meat. Never, ever roast a duck over an open fire barbecue without a drip tray. The perpetually recurring flare-ups will not just singe your eyebrows but set your whole garden ablaze.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  101. #100  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Thanks lady for that useful information.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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