Notices
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 501 to 561 of 561
Like Tree291Likes

Thread: Hey hey good lookin'...whatcha got cookin'?

  1. #501  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    I made a second Thanksgiving meal on Friday:

    My beautiful turkey...Brined for 12 hours, smoked for 12 hours. The meat had a slightly pinkish tint due to the smoking, and was super juicy..it was awesome (pats self on back) Although the camera glitched an added some blue noise...need to filter that out with Photoshop.



    The spread:



    The table:

    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #502  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Twice Baked Potatoes



    4 Baking Potatoes
    2 Tablespoons of butter
    1/3 Cup of hot milk
    Salt and pepper
    1/4 Cup sour cream
    1 Tablespoon of canola oil
    Grated cheddar cheese


    Wash and scrub potatoes thoroughly. Oil skin of the potatoes, and wrap each in aluminum foil. Bake in 350F oven for 1 hour or until soft. Remove potatoes and allow to cool enough to be handled with ease. Slice potatoes in half lengthwise.

    Cradle the potato half in your hand, and very gently use a large spoon to scoop out the potato innards. Leave a small amount of the potato attached to the skin to give it strength. Place the scooped out potato innards in a medium bowl. Add butter to the hot milk and allow to melt. Add milk/butter mixture and sour cream to the potatoes. Salt and pepper to taste. Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes until smooth. Be careful not to over do it. If you overbeat the potatoes, gluten will develop and turn the mix into wallpaper paste.

    Refill the potato skins with the mashed potatoes. I generally make more than I need, and freeze the extras at this point. When you are ready to serve, top the potatoes with cheddar cheese and place under a broiler until cheese is melted. If you want to "bacon-up" this recipe you can also add bacon bits...because everything is better with bacon.



    Print this Recipe
    pyoko, Ascended and scheherazade like this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #503  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Damn Mac...what is your cholesterol level!!!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #504  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    8,231
    I overindulged this Saturday and still had enough left over so it could serve as Sunday dinner:

    Basted beef tjops, "skilpadjies", beef kebabs, lamb rib, cheese boerewors and potato bake with cream and mushrooms.

    Skilpadjies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    Boerewors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    *Not my own pictures
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #505  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Excellent, Kalster. I have learned about two new types of foods from your post. We have a great variety of sausages at our store and at a specialty Delicatessan a short distance away. I'm sure you would enjoy trying the many types of venison, bison, pork, turkey and mixed meat sausages available here. If you should ever visit the Yukon, come bewteen May and early September and enjoy our outdoor BBQ season. Octoberfest sausage with sauerkraut is one that I really enjoy.

    Not my picture either but it is a yummy representation.

    KALSTER, pyoko, Ascended and 2 others like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #506  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    8,231
    I am more than up for that! I have never had sauerkraut before. Not sure if I have even seen it in the shops. Might have a more careful look. We aren't such big eaters of turkey either. We might throw some smoked turkey on the coals every now and then though.
    Last edited by KALSTER; December 2nd, 2013 at 03:58 PM. Reason: removed some "though"s
    scheherazade likes this.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #507  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Repost from JREF forum:

    Quote Originally Posted by leftysergeant View Post
    Tanzanian savory crepes with suppu ya ndizi.

    Suppu ya ndizi:

    Three large golden-ripe plaintans, chopped
    3 cups water or stock
    1 large red onion, chopped
    2Tbsp crushed garlic
    2Tbsp oil or ghee
    1 Maggi seasoning cube - or - use stock
    1Tspn lime juice
    Boil plantains until soft.
    Saute onion and garlic

    Combine and puree, return to heat until desired thickness.

    Serve with crepes, chapti or ugali

    Crepes :

    2cups all purpose flour
    3 eggs
    2Tbsp ghee or melted butter
    2cups water
    1 small red onion, finely diced
    3 chopped scallions
    4 Tbsp chopped cilantro
    Salt to taste

    Combine dry ingreients with egg and ghee, mix thoroughly then add half of water to work out lumps then the rest top create a thin batter. Add chopped garnishes. Ladel onto hot skillet, tipping to spread in a thin layer, brown, dot with butter and brown the other side.one side until it pulls from the pan.

    Goes well with light meals with a little chutney and tea.
    My response:

    "Hey Ma! The sarge done posted a recipe for Tarzan Pancakes!"

    "Honey, that's Tanzanian...It's in South East Africa, does it sounds good?"

    "Far as I can tell...I don't know what half this **** is. I better goes on that thar internet thang and look it up. Isn't a ghee what them karate fellers wear?"

    "That's Gi, honey"

    "Ok...I'll be back in a bit...I gotta go down to the Nativity scene in the square and ask one of the Maji's for a seasoning cube."


    Looks good Sarge...I know they sell plantains at the Mexican market down the street...might have to try
    KALSTER likes this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #508  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Excellent, Kalster. I have learned about two new types of foods from your post. We have a great variety of sausages at our store and at a specialty Delicatessan a short distance away. I'm sure you would enjoy trying the many types of venison, bison, pork, turkey and mixed meat sausages available here. If you should ever visit the Yukon, come bewteen May and early September and enjoy our outdoor BBQ season. Octoberfest sausage with sauerkraut is one that I really enjoy.

    Not my picture either but it is a yummy representation.

    I will behave. I will behave. I will behave.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #509  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post
    I am more than up for that! I have never had sauerkraut before. Not sure if I have even seen it in the shops. Might have a more careful look. We aren't such big eaters of turkey either. We might throw some smoked turkey on the coals every now and then though.
    Mom used to make(as in can) it. I get cravings for it!!
    scheherazade likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #510  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    3
    If craving noodles with gluten intolerance, or trying to avoid carbohydrtes, find Konjac noodles, sold in Australian supermarkets as 'Slendier'. They are an excellent alternative to wheat &c noodles and so easy to use!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #511  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    Quote Originally Posted by grendel22 View Post
    If craving noodles with gluten intolerance, or trying to avoid carbohydrtes, find Konjac noodles, sold in Australian supermarkets as 'Slendier'. They are an excellent alternative to wheat &c noodles and so easy to use!
    Welcome to the forum.

    I had to look up konjac and found some pictures if anyones interested.

    What Is Konjac - Bing Images


    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #512  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Konjac is also very high in fiber and contains almost no calories. It is also an ingredient in those popular Asian Fruit Jelly snacks.

    Konjac is grown in China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan and southeast Asia for its large starchy corms, used to create a flour and jelly of the same name. It is also used as a vegan substitute for gelatin.
    Konjac - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    There are a number of benefits associated with Konjac but a few cautionary considerations as well.

    Side Effects Of Konjac Root | LIVESTRONG.COM
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #513  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    Saw this recipe and had to post it. Looks damn good to me.

    Country Breakfast Quiche



    BY: Cooking Club of America

    Retired Air Force Colonel Katherine Lemay Brown and her husband own a luxury bed and breakfast. This recipe is an absolute favorite of our guests, she says. And the options it offers are limitless. Try adding different herbs to the crust, or alter the custard by using crab, salmon or fresh vegetables.

    3 cups frozen hash brown potatoes, thawed, squeezed dry
    1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    2 tablespoons butter, melted, divided
    1 teaspoon mixed dried herbs (such as thyme, onion powder, rosemary and/or paprika)
    1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
    4 eggs
    1 1/2 cups half-and-half
    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1 cup shredded Gruyre or Swiss cheese
    4 oz. cooked ham, sausage or bacon, chopped

    1. Heat oven to 425F. Spray 9-inch quiche pan or deep-dish pie pan with cooking spray. Combine potatoes, Parmesan cheese, 1 tablespoon of the butter, dried herbs and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt in medium bowl. Press into bottom and up sides of pan. Bake 20 minutes or until potatoes are set; cool 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350F.

    2. Meanwhile, whisk eggs, half-and-half, flour, remaining 1 tablespoon butter, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper in medium bowl. Sprinkle Gruyre cheese and ham over crust; pour in egg mixture. Bake at 350F. for 30 to 40 minutes or until puffed and golden brown and knife inserted in center comes out clean (center will be slightly soft). Cool 10 minutes before slicing.

    8 servings

    PER SERVING: 260 calories, 17.5 g total fat (9.5 g saturated fat), 14 g protein, 12.5 g carbohydrate, 15.5 mg cholesterol, 610 mg sodium, .5 g fiber

    Country Breakfast Quiche > Cooking Club of America
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #514  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    I eat whatever I want...in moderation
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #515  
    Ascended Member Ascended's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Norfolk
    Posts
    3,414
    Tonight's dinner, chicken tikka masala & chips.



    https://www.dropbox.com/s/i2gy4tqcpfqu5tc/tonights dinner.jpg
    scheherazade and babe like this.
    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. - confucius
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #516  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Let me repost that for you



    Oh robot...real men don't cook quiche, we cook "egg pie"
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #517  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Yes to the quiche. I have a really simple tomato basil quiche I make all the time. Wonderful.



    Ingredients:

    Olive oil
    1 medium onion, chopped
    3 roma tomatoes, sliced
    Flour
    Basil
    3 large eggs
    1/2 cup milk
    Salt and pepper
    1 (9 inch) unbaked deep dish pie crust
    1 1/2 cups shredded colby-jack cheese

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Let the frozen pie shell thaw for 10 minutes. Then bake it for 8 minutes.

    2. Heat some olive oil in a skillet. Sautee the onions until they are tender. Remove them from the skillet and set aside.

    3. Pour a handful of flour on the cutting board and sprinkle in some basil. Roll the tomato slices in the mixture until they are covered lightly. Place them in the skillet and sautee them a bit on each side. Remove and set aside.

    4. In a bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk. Salt and pepper them to season.

    5. When the crust is ready, spread 1 cup of cheese along the bottom of the pie. Place a thin layer of onion on top and follow with a layer of tomato slices. Fill the pie crust with the egg mixture. Place a few more tomato slices on top. Finally, sprinkle the other 1/2 cup of cheese on top.

    6. Bake in the oven at 400 degrees for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350 and bake for an additional 20 minutes. The quiche should be cooked through and not watery. It should be tender to the touch, but firm. The top may be slightly browned. Let it cool for a few minutes. Best served warm.

    Serves 8
    Preparation Time: 10 minutes
    Cooking Time: 30 minutes
    scheherazade, Bad Robot and babe like this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #518  
    Ascended Member Ascended's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Norfolk
    Posts
    3,414
    Thx Mac
    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. - confucius
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #519  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    When I saw this picture, it made me realize how much I miss barbecue.



    I'm drooling again.

    Ascended and scheherazade like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #520  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    One of my favorite (and hardest to make) breakfasts. Scotch Egg. Getting an egg to cook just right through a sausage covering which also needs to properly cook is tough, but it's worth it.



    EDIT: I was really proud of that picture. I got the egg exactly where I wanted it.

    EDIT #2: My recipe and comments if anyone wants them:

    Ingredients:

    Sauce:

    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
    1 tsp ground mustard
    Garlic powder
    Ground pepper
    Salt

    Everything else:

    5 eggs
    12 oz sausage
    Parmesan cheese, grated
    Bread crumbs
    Flour
    Olive oil
    Spinach
    Arugula

    Directions:

    Step 1: Place 4 eggs in a pot and fill with water until the eggs are covered. Bring the water to a slow boil and then remove from heat. Let the eggs sit in the water for 3 minutes if they are regular eggs and up to 5 minutes if they are jumbo eggs. Immediately remove them from the boiling water and place them in a bowl of cold water. You can them place them in the refrigerator if you like. This makes sure the cooking process is stopped so you don't end up with hard-boiled eggs.

    *tip: While boiling an egg sounds like the easiest thing on the planet, it can actually be pretty tough to get just right, sort of like cooking rice. The perfect soft-boiled egg should have a thick, but runny yolk and a completely cooked white. In order to make the process easier on yourself, only use eggs that are room temperature. Setting your eggs out about 30 minutes before you plan on cooking them works well. Also try to use eggs that are about a week old. Fresh eggs will be much harder to peel once they are boiled than eggs which have had some time to rest.

    Step 2: Take a sausage of your choice and flatten it into disks. Place the peeled, cooked egg inside and roll the sausage around it. Use the remaining egg yolk to create a wash for the eggs. After they are covered in the egg, dust them lightly with flour and roll them in bread crumbs.

    Step 3: Pour some olive oil into a skillet and bring it up to heat. Simmer the scotch egg in the olive oil until it is thoroughly cooked on all sides. Place it on a bed of greens and grate some cheese over top.

    Step 4: In a small bowl, mix together the balsamic vinegar, olive oil, ground mustard, a pinch of salt, garlic powder and pepper to taste. Drizzle the mixture over the scotch egg and enjoy.


    Serves 4
    Preparation Time: 10 minutes
    Cooking Time: 15 minutes
    Last edited by Flick Montana; December 4th, 2013 at 01:06 PM.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #521  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    On an aside, have any of you guys ever put together your own cookbook? I did it (that's where all my pictures and recipes come from) in the hopes of sharing all of my recipes with my kids, should I ever take a severe blow to the head and decide having kids is a good idea. I highly recommend it. It was really fun. You can even add in sections for recipes from other family and get a whole family cookbook going.
    scheherazade and babe like this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #522  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    I have made the sausage wrapped eggs for trail food, (Scotch Eggs, the recipe was called) using hard boiled eggs for my purposes. I tip my hat to anyone who would undertake to do the venture with soft boiled eggs. That really is going above and beyond. Never mind road rage, lol, I think that I mind encouter kitchen rage. I'm reasonably good at poaching an egg to the soft yolk stage though, and I make a wicked crustless spinach quiche that rivals Mac's cooking for cholesterol levels. Next time I make it, I shall have to get pictures. It is usually chowed down before I think about the camera, lol...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #523  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    I have made the sausage wrapped eggs for trail food, (Scotch Eggs, the recipe was called) using hard boiled eggs for my purposes. I tip my hat to anyone who would undertake to do the venture with soft boiled eggs. That really is going above and beyond. Never mind road rage, lol, I think that I mind encouter kitchen rage. I'm reasonably good at poaching an egg to the soft yolk stage though, and I make a wicked crustless spinach quiche that rivals Mac's cooking for cholesterol levels. Next time I make it, I shall have to get pictures. It is usually chowed down before I think about the camera, lol...


    Being in the kitchen is zen for me.

    As for the egg being trail food, I think they are typically eaten like you suggest. Hard boiled and eaten cold. I tried it soft boiled and, who knows, maybe I just got lucky.
    scheherazade likes this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #524  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    On an aside, have any of you guys ever put together your own cookbook? I did it (that's where all my pictures and recipes come from) in the hopes of sharing all of my recipes with my kids, should I ever take a severe blow to the head and decide having kids is a good idea. I highly recommend it. It was really fun. You can even add in sections for recipes from other family and get a whole family cookbook going.
    Depending on how elaborate you want to be, you can even do it with on-line software and publish it in soft or hardcover, a single copy or multiples. Hubby did a very special gift book for my birthday a couple of years ago using BLURB. If you are interested just type that into your search for details. I'm sure there may be other such services but we were pleased with the ease of using the software, the product and the delivery.
    Flick Montana and babe like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #525  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    I put it together in Photoshop and had it spiral bound. Even got the covers laminated since it is going to be around plenty of messes.
    scheherazade likes this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #526  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    On an aside, have any of you guys ever put together your own cookbook? I did it (that's where all my pictures and recipes come from) in the hopes of sharing all of my recipes with my kids, should I ever take a severe blow to the head and decide having kids is a good idea. I highly recommend it. It was really fun. You can even add in sections for recipes from other family and get a whole family cookbook going.
    I have. I'd like to write a cookbook for bachelors and non-cooks.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #527  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    On an aside, have any of you guys ever put together your own cookbook? I did it (that's where all my pictures and recipes come from) in the hopes of sharing all of my recipes with my kids, should I ever take a severe blow to the head and decide having kids is a good idea. I highly recommend it. It was really fun. You can even add in sections for recipes from other family and get a whole family cookbook going.
    I have. I'd like to write a cookbook for bachelors and non-cooks.
    A girlfriend and I had a similar idea, given that a lot of the guys we knew at the time couldn't find their way around the kitchen with a seeing eye dog, lol...

    We were going to title it, the "Sheep Can't Cook Bachelor's Cookbook."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #528  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    First attempt at a French baggette:

    pyoko, scheherazade and wegs like this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  29. #529  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    OMG!!! I just tasted it, and it's so salty, it's inediable. I was wondering when the guy in the video said a tablespoon of salt for 4 cups of flour...that seemed like alot. I did a half reciepe with 2 cups of flour and 1/2 tb of salt...and whew!!! too much. This one is bird food. Next time I'm using 1/3 the salt. 1/2 a teaspoon instead of a tablespoon.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTY4WJRSzY8
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  30. #530  
    ...matter and pixie dust wegs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2,057
    Good eats ^^ What am I cookin? Hmmm...an egg white veggie omelette. No pics, sorry. lol It's camera-shy.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  31. #531  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    OMG!!! I just tasted it, and it's so salty, it's inediable. I was wondering when the guy in the video said a tablespoon of salt for 4 cups of flour...that seemed like alot. I did a half reciepe with 2 cups of flour and 1/2 tb of salt...and whew!!! too much. This one is bird food. Next time I'm using 1/3 the salt. 1/2 a teaspoon instead of a tablespoon.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTY4WJRSzY8
    I made a coleslaw dressing recipe from scratch one time, following the instructions EXACTLY. Like you, I wondered about the amount of salt and had to pitch the whole thing in the end. From then on, I trust my instincts because I have been cooking for years and much of it without a recipe or from memory and past experience. It is absolutely astounding the number of such errors that get past editing, and in big name publications too.

    Let the buyer...and the would-be chef, beware! There be plenty of pitfalls out there in the recipe world.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  32. #532  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    When I saw this picture, it made me realize how much I miss barbecue.



    I'm drooling again.

    Wait 8 minutes and I'll turn you over.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  33. #533  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    My kids use the phone..."Mom, how do you make your chicken in white wine sauce?"
    KALSTER likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  34. #534  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    My kids use the phone..."Mom, how do you make your chicken in white wine sauce?"
    Broil the chicken and drink the wine 'til you're sauced?
    KALSTER and Bad Robot like this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  35. #535  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    (parody) Some of us resemble this.

    The Twenty-Third Pound.

    My appetite is my downfall
    I shall always want
    It maketh me sit down and stuff myself
    It leadeth me to my refrigerator, repeatedly
    It leadeth me to *Burger King* for a Whopper
    It destroyeth my shape
    Yea, though I gaineth weight
    I will not stop eating
    For the food tasteth so good
    The ice cream and the cookies,they comfort me
    When the table is spread before me
    It excitheth me, for I know I shall soon dig in
    As I fill my plate continuously
    My form runneth over, for my clothes get smaller.
    Surely bulges and excess weight shall follow me
    All the days of my life.
    And I shall dwell in the House of Pancakes forever
    sculptor and babe like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  36. #536  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    My kids use the phone..."Mom, how do you make your chicken in white wine sauce?"
    Broil the chicken and drink the wine 'til you're sauced?
    er that isn't the recipe for marinated stuffed flank steak *laughing
    Reply With Quote  
     

  37. #537  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    (parody) Some of us resemble this.

    The Twenty-Third Pound.

    My appetite is my downfall
    I shall always want
    It maketh me sit down and stuff myself
    It leadeth me to my refrigerator, repeatedly
    It leadeth me to *Burger King* for a Whopper
    It destroyeth my shape
    Yea, though I gaineth weight
    I will not stop eating
    For the food tasteth so good
    The ice cream and the cookies,they comfort me
    When the table is spread before me
    It excitheth me, for I know I shall soon dig in
    As I fill my plate continuously
    My form runneth over, for my clothes get smaller.
    Surely bulges and excess weight shall follow me
    All the days of my life.
    And I shall dwell in the House of Pancakes forever
    I still wuv you...handing him a rubber ducky
    Bad Robot likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  38. #538  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    My baguette bread bowls for my broccoli, cheese and chicken soup:


    Last edited by MacGyver1968; December 6th, 2013 at 01:50 PM.
    babe likes this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  39. #539  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    My baguette bread bowls for my broccoli, cheese and chicken soup:
    Those look great, are you going to take pictures when you cut them out and fill them?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  40. #540  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    First attempt at a French baggette:

    Now, there is a well used cooking tray.
    It has character.
    It carries it's knife scars well and proudly desplays the patination of many a past meal.

    I'm beginning to feel like Pavlov's hound.
    babe likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  41. #541  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    My cast iron skillet is over 100 years old. Now that's some character! We tried to figure out how many meals have been cooked in it's lifetime. My grandmother had 7 children...so alot.

    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  42. #542  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    8,231
    Is that shortcake?
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  43. #543  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Cornbread
    KALSTER likes this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  44. #544  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    My wonderful 2nd attempt at a french baguette...it turned out AWESOME. I only got my intial taste...mom and sis ate all of it!



    Although, the bottom one sorta resembles a giant dick...I guess I need to work on my rolling technique.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  45. #545  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    My wonderful 2nd attempt at a french baguette...it turned out AWESOME. I only got my intial taste...mom and sis ate all of it!



    Although, the bottom one sorta resembles a giant dick...I guess I need to work on my rolling technique.
    try twisting the dough....then it won't look like a dick *L*
    Reply With Quote  
     

  46. #546  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    I made bagels:





    I think when I form them next time, I need to make them skinnier with a bigger hole. They poofed up so much in cooking it cracked the crust.
    Ascended and Bad Robot like this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  47. #547  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    WHERE ARE MINE? *glare*
    Reply With Quote  
     

  48. #548  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Mac, did you boil your bagels first?

    A bagel (also spelled beigel)[1] is a bread product, traditionally shaped by hand into the form of a ring from yeasted wheat dough, roughly hand-sized, which is first boiled for a short time in water and then baked
    Years ago I considered making bagels and then decided it was more work than I was interested in compared to making regular yeast bread.
    Flick Montana and Bad Robot like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  49. #549  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Yes. I followed a recipe I found online. You boil them for about 30 seconds on each side before cooking.
    Flick Montana likes this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  50. #550  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Where are mine? *L*...never mind...they'd be mold by the time they got here.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  51. #551  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Mac, did you boil your bagels first?

    A bagel (also spelled beigel)[1] is a bread product, traditionally shaped by hand into the form of a ring from yeasted wheat dough, roughly hand-sized, which is first boiled for a short time in water and then baked
    Years ago I considered making bagels and then decided it was more work than I was interested in compared to making regular yeast bread.
    Ever made pretzels? You have to boil them in water with baking soda.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  52. #552  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Had some leftover apples that needed to be used...these were "smack you mama" good.



    Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal Cookies

    makes about 18 cookies to 24 cookies

    Print this Recipe!


    1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter , softened

    1/2 cup granulated sugar

    1/2 cup brown sugar, packed

    1 large egg

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    1 cup all-purpose flour

    1 1/4 cup oats, old fashioned or quick cooking

    1/2 teaspoon baking powder

    1/2 teaspoon baking soda

    scant 1/2 teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    generous pinch fresh grated nutmeg

    3/4 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

    1 medium apple, peeled, diced small

    1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice


    Place a rack in the center and upper third of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

    Peel and dice the apple and toss with lemon juice. Set aside.

    Beat the sugar and butter in the bowl of a stand mixer fit with a paddle attachment. Beat until creamy, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add egg one, beating for 1 minute.. Add the vanilla extract and beat until blended.

    Whisk together the oats, flour, baking powder, baking soda, spices and salt. Add to the butter and egg mixture slowly beating on low speed until just incorporated. Stir in the walnuts and apple chunks last.

    Bake at 350 degrees F for 10 to 13 minutes or until they’ve reached your desired doneness. I like mine a little underdone and cook them for 10 minutes. Allow to cool on the cookie sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. Or you could just eat them warm. That’s probably the best idea. Makes about 2 dozen cookies.
    babe likes this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  53. #553  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    I made some cinnamon oatmeal raisin muffins this morning:



    1 egg
    3/4 c. milk
    1/2 c. raisins
    1/2 c. oil
    1 c. flour
    1 c. oats
    1/3 c. sugar
    3 tsp. baking powder
    1 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. nutmeg
    2 tsp. cinnamon

    Beat egg; stir in remaining ingredients mixing just to moisten. Pour into 12 paper lined muffin cups until 3/4 full. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Serve warm or cool with butter.
    Bad Robot likes this.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  54. #554  
    Theatre Whore babe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Resident of Big Island of Hawai'i since 2003, and in Bayside, Ca. since 1981, Humboldt since 1977
    Posts
    13,149
    Chef MacGuyver!!!!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  55. #555  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    Anybody can make these New Years edible delites (see link below).



    Hungry Happenings: Toot your own edible horn this New Year's eve.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  56. #556  
    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,809
    This is a good recipe.

    Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls

    INGREDIENT


    9 1/2 oz WATER Warm
    1 oz YEAST, ACTIVE, DRY
    1 1/3 lb FLOUR, BREAD
    1/2 oz SALT
    2 oz SUGAR
    1 oz Dry MILK POWDER
    1 oz SHORTENING, ALL-PURPOSE
    1 oz UNSALTED BUTTER, Softened
    1 Egg, LARGE, WHOLE




    Egg Wash As needed
    * Poppy seeds or sesame seeds as desired


    1. Mix yeast and water in a small bowl. Combine the remaining ingredients (except the egg wash) in the bowl of an electric mixer.


    2. Add the yeast/water mixture to the ingredients in the mixer bowl then stir to combine.


    3. Fit the mixer with a dough hook and knead for approximately 10 minutes.


    4. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover and place in a warm spot. Let rise until doubled in bulk. This will take approximately 1 hour.


    5. Punch down the dough. Reform to a ball again, cover again and let it rise until nearly doubled in bulk.


    6. Punch the dough down then allow it to rest for ten minutes before proceeding. Next, cut the dough into 2 oz. portions for dinner rolls or 4 oz. portions for sandwich rolls.


    7. Shape as desired and arrange on parchment lined sheet pans. Proof until doubled in size.


    8. Carefully brush the proofed rolls with egg wash. Sprinkle with poppy seeds or sesame seeds as desired. Bake in a preheated oven at 400F (200C) until medium brown, approximately 12-15 minutes


    YIELD: Unit: 24 dinner rolls or 12 sandwich rolls



    I've made them mixing by hand.
    scheherazade and babe like this.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  57. #557  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    Here's the cookies I made for the Christmas baskets.
    Cinnamon apple oatmeal:

    Chocolate/chocolate chip:

    Cranberry orange:

    Snickerdoodles
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  58. #558  
    ...matter and pixie dust wegs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2,057
    mmmm ^^ those look yum I posted a pic MacGyver, in Scheh's 'what are you doing' thread...I baked a bunch of cookies yesterday,
    Reply With Quote  
     

  59. #559  
    ...matter and pixie dust wegs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2,057
    oh my gosh, these are SO cool!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    Anybody can make these New Years edible delites (see link below).



    Hungry Happenings: Toot your own edible horn this New Year's eve.
    babe likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  60. #560  
    AI's Have More Fun Bad Robot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,114
    This looked very good to me, especially in all this cold weather we've been having.

    How To: Super-Decadent Creamy Cocoa

    3 Rich, Creamy Hot Cocoas

    Ascended and scheherazade like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  61. #561  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,066
    Gluten Free Peanut Butter Almond Cookies
    Adapted by Lorrina Mitchell 2013

    Preheat oven to 350F (180C) Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

    Ingredients:
    1 cup ground almonds
    cup gluten free flour (I used rice flour)
    1/3 cup milled flaxseed
    1 tsp baking powder
    Combine dry ingredients in a small bowl and stir to mix.

    In a larger bowl combine the following:
    cup salted butter, at room temperature
    cup Peanut Butter
    1 cup sugar
    Stir together until smooth.
    2 eggs, lightly beaten. Add to PB/butter/Sugar mixture and beat in.

    Stir dry ingredients into your moist mixture until a smooth dough forms.

    Drop by rounded tablespoonfuls (approx 25 ml) onto your prepared baking sheet. These spread quite a lot so I do 9 cookies to a sheet.

    Bake in center of oven for 12-14 minutes, rotating sheet at the halfway time for even baking.

    Allow to cool 5 minutes on baking sheet before transferring to a wire rack.

    The flavours come together wonderfully if you can resist them for 24 hours.

    Makes 24-30 cookies.
    babe likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Similar Threads

  1. Hey Everyone!
    By Blink in forum Introductions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 26th, 2011, 08:07 AM
  2. Hey all!
    By Raziell in forum Introductions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 12th, 2008, 06:58 PM
  3. Hey there
    By Vid P in forum Introductions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 30th, 2008, 09:24 PM
  4. Hey
    By nodnil in forum Introductions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 30th, 2008, 11:54 PM
  5. Hey There!
    By JakeH in forum Introductions
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: October 4th, 2006, 10:56 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •