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Thread: Hey hey good lookin'...whatcha got cookin'?

  1. #101  
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    No, No, No that just ain't right, bacon flavoured coffee, how could anyone come with something like that.
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  2. #102  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    No, No, No that just ain't right, bacon flavoured coffee, how could anyone come with something like that.
    Totally twisted, I concur. Still it has nothing on the following recipe for which the primary ingredients are coffee......and one elephant. Seriously.

    The Thai Arabica beans are harvested in Thailand and then fed to local elephants, rescued from roaming in the Southeast Asian nation’s bustling streets. Once digested, the “naturally refined” beans are handpicked by elephant trainers and sun-dried, according to the release. 10,000 beans need to be handpicked out of the warm, mushy dung of the caffeinated mammals to gain one kilo of the precious Black Ivory Coffee.
    10,000 beans/kilo, handpicked from warm elephant dung. How would you write that up on your resume? Sanitary bio-chemical engineering comes to mind, lol...

    ENJOY!
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  3. #103  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    No, No, No that just ain't right, bacon flavoured coffee, how could anyone come with something like that.
    Totally twisted, I concur. Still it has nothing on the following recipe for which the primary ingredients are coffee......and one elephant. Seriously.

    The Thai Arabica beans are harvested in Thailand and then fed to local elephants, rescued from roaming in the Southeast Asian nation’s bustling streets. Once digested, the “naturally refined” beans are handpicked by elephant trainers and sun-dried, according to the release. 10,000 beans need to be handpicked out of the warm, mushy dung of the caffeinated mammals to gain one kilo of the precious Black Ivory Coffee.
    10,000 beans/kilo, handpicked from warm elephant dung. How would you write that up on your resume? Sanitary bio-chemical engineering comes to mind, lol...

    ENJOY!

    He must have missed the one you have pictured above. I wonder If I could start my own poop brand of very expensive coffee?

    Top 10 Most Expensive Coffees In The World



    According to Forbes and the article is somewhat old but not so much that anything has changed, these are the most expensive coffees in the world. I did some needed research and find it to be true although I swear Kopi Luwak was more expensive than $160 a pound. Oh well, there just aren’t that many people willing to give a price like that for poop coffee, now is there. Enjoy the list. Oh yeah! And read my Kopi review I wrote some time back if you have a mind to find out where it comes from: Kopi Luwak Review



    Coffee: Kopi Luwak
    Grown in: Indonesia
    Yup.. I have tried it since I first reviewed it and well…. it is different, but I would not call it good or worth the price. Sorry about that.
    Cost: $160 per pound


    Coffee: Hacienda La Esmeralda
    Grown in: Boquete, Panama
    Hard to come by. I have not tried it.
    Cost: $104 per pound


    Coffee: Island of St. Helena Coffee Company
    Grown in: St. Helena
    A new one on me. No idea. Anyone?
    Cost: $79 per pound


    Coffee: El Injerto
    Grown in: Huehuetenango, Guatemala
    Still waiting to try.
    Cost: $25 per pound green at auction
    Expected to retail for more than $50 per pound


    Coffee: Fazenda Santa Ines
    Grown in: Minas Gerais, Brazil
    Have not tried yet.
    Cost: $50 per pound green at auction


    Coffee: Blue Mountain
    Grown in: Wallenford Estate, Jamaica
    Oh Lord… what a nice bean. Mellow yet bold enough to get your attention. Smooth and addictive.
    Cost: $49 per pound


    Coffee: Los Planes
    Grown in: Citala, El Salvador
    Not had the pleasure of trying this one yet.
    Cost: $30 per 12 ounces ($40 per pound)


    Coffee: Kona
    Grown in: Hawaii
    One of my favorites. Not fond of a lighter roast but this one is usually the best.
    Cost: $30 per 14 ounces (about $34 per pound)


    Coffee: Yauco Selecto AA
    Grown in: Puerto Rico
    Inconsistent but still a good cup if made right.
    Cost: $22 per pound


    Coffee: Fazenda Sao Benedito
    Grown in: Minas Gerias, Brazil
    A local coffee shop had a bit of this a couple months back.. maybe it was several months. Time flies. Rich and rewarding. A bit nutty and smoky and a somewhat lingering aftertaste. a good cup.
    Cost: $21 per pound


    Top 10 Highest Priced Coffees In The World $$
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  4. #104  
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    I found this picture in a news article of pictures that look Photoshopped. I really want to cook it up and eat it.

    Glass gem corn is real, and each kernel is from a different variety of corn.
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  5. #105  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    I found this picture in a news article of pictures that look Photoshopped. I really want to cook it up and eat it.

    Glass gem corn is real, and each kernel is from a different variety of corn.
    Now that looks like a way to get kids interested in eating their veggies!

    As it happens, before human selection interfered, corn ears were all multi-coloured.* Kernels are siblings housed on the same ear, meaning that each kernel has its own set of genes, including those that control colour. According to the Toronto Globe and Mail columnist April Holladay:
    Livestock feeders prefer vitamin-rich yellow kernels, Southerners like white kernels, and Native Americans favor blue. Years of deliberate selection, careful pollination, and storing of seeds produced these single-color corn ears. [...] Some studies suggest corn pigments promote resistance to insects or fungi that invade an ear of corn.

    The Most Beautiful Corn in the World
    I'd be tempted to try growing some up here but our season is too short although a few people do try to grow corn in greenhouses, with a tall roof required and additional heat which gets pretty costly with the price of any type of heating in these parts.
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  6. #106  
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    Oh wow! I've always looked longingly at the blue corn seed packets - but corn takes too much water in the first place, so planting extra just for interest or fun is too much of an extravagance.

    But this. This! If I could get it I'd plant it.

    And, and, and ...... is this why popcorn is coloured. Because the original corn was multi-coloured when it popped?
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  7. #107  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    That would make a really pretty dish.
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    And, and, and ...... is this why popcorn is coloured. Because the original corn was multi-coloured when it popped?
    No, the popped corn is all white. At least that's true for the red popcorn and black colored popcorn that I've popped.
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  9. #109  
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    Really? I'm sure I saw some blue corn popped and it came out a funny mauve-greyish-dirty sort of colour. I'll have a bit of a think about where I might have seen it.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  10. #110  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post

    Yikes, that's almost as bad as scheherazade's bacon flavour coffee. I don't mind milk or protein shakes but come on chocolate, strawberry or banana flavour please, the whole idea of bacon flavour is just no, please save it for the crisps.
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  11. #111  
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    I'm thinking about making some mashed potatoes with butternut squash in them this Thanksgiving. Anyone ever tried it? I think the color would be amazing and who doesn't like butternut squash?
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  12. #112  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    I'm thinking about making some mashed potatoes with butternut squash in them this Thanksgiving. Anyone ever tried it? I think the color would be amazing and who doesn't like butternut squash?
    Sounds good...but you have to be careful changing up traditional meals. I'd try it out first. My sister, one thanksgiving decided to be all different and serve an apricot stuffing rather than the traditional cornbread stuffing we normally have. It was god awful. Even though it was 20 years ago...we still give her crap about it.

    I'm a pretty strict traditionalist when it comes to Thanksgiving...to me, it's not really the time to experiment. I know when I get my cousin Frank's...there will be deep fried turkey, cornbread stuffing, mashed potatoes, green bean cassarole, broccoli, rice and cheese cassarole, home made bread...and a bunch of other stuff....but those are the items I really look forward to eating.

    Last edited by MacGyver1968; November 7th, 2012 at 05:34 PM.
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    We do this often for meals at home. My husband likes to cook some leek in with the potatoes as well. Depends on whether you'd like the texture whether you include leeks when serving or you lift them out before mashing.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Another nice combination is to mix yam or sweet potato half and half with your regular mashed taters. However, as MacGyver suggests, there are some that are offended by anything 'new' for a traditional meal. They may be very amenable on another occasion but traditional meals are steeped in memory and emotion. I think your squash idea would be delightful but I'm also throwing up a caution flag on the timing.

    You know your family and guests best, so make your decision accordingly.

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  15. #115  
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    You could always leave some of the potatoes plain, and do some with squash. Who knows...it might be a hit, and become a new tradition.
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  16. #116  
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    Adelady, is there a traditional "harvest festival" type meal in the land down under?
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  17. #117  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    I'm thinking about making some mashed potatoes with butternut squash in them this Thanksgiving. Anyone ever tried it? I think the color would be amazing and who doesn't like butternut squash?
    Sounds good...but you have to be careful changing up traditional meals. I'd try it out first. My sister, one thanksgiving decided to be all different and serve an apricot stuffing rather than the traditional cornbread stuffing we normally have. It was god awful. Even though it was 20 years ago...we still give her crap about it.

    I'm a pretty strict traditionalist when it comes to Thanksgiving...to me, it's not really the time to experiment. I know when I get my cousin Frank's...there will be deep fried turkey, cornbread stuffing, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, broccoli, rice and cheese casserole, home made bread...and a bunch of other stuff....but those are the items I really look forward to eating.
    As long as all the traditional foods are present, I don't see why an interesting experiment couldn't be added for people to try. After all when are you going to ever have all those taste buds handy to let you know if it's good or not?
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  18. #118  
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    How about a Thanksgiving pic from 25 years ago:


    Look at me...I'm all skinny and tan. ( I was a tanning salon manager at the time)
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  19. #119  
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    Harvest Festival? We used to have a church thing when I was a kid. We'd all bring along various food items and they'd go to charity. But no special meal. Easter maybe?

    No, our big pig-out meal is Xmas. My family, just once, tried a cold seafood Xmas dinner - with loud, furious protests from my older daughter and my sister's older daughter. Both of them it should be noted were not attending the meal in question, being overseas and interstate respectively. One of them had a white Xmas in England that year, the other stinking hot (in Alice Springs) but both made time to call us and sneer derisively that our choice of a cold meal made it a cold and rainy Xmas in Adelaide. So there! See what you get when you destroy our cherished family traditions!

    Australia Day is at the end of January. Strictly a shorts and tees around the barbie event. Nothing like a Thanksgiving.

    So. We have roast turkey, and chicken for the turkey hater, ham, roasted potatoes, pumpkin, onions, leeks, parsnips and carrots, peas with mint sauce, cauliflower au gratin, broccoli ditto, gravy, bread sauce, cranberry sauce, tomatoes baked with a cheese and breadcrumb topping. (Nothing mashed you'll observe.) Basically we started out 40 odd years ago with a largish roasted meal with ham additional, and everybody's favourites have gradually expanded it until it's turned into a bit of a tasting platter. This year there'll be roasted pork as well because my daughter's almost-in-laws are coming - so their traditional preference has to be catered for. More importantly, it ensures that everyone has something to do and something to contribute.

    Noone could possibly have had enough to eat from that lot, so we have to have plum pudding - always an adventure when my mum sets the far too liberal splosh of brandy alight - with brandy sauce and custard and cream and icecream available for various fussbudgets who insist on their own personal favourites. Others take advantage and have the whole lot.

    A lot of Australians do have the seafood extravaganza meal. If I want one of those I'll have to have it somewhere else on some other day.
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  20. #120  
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    Sweet...thanks for the info...I like learning about you weird people that live upside down.
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    I have been making these for Thanksgiving for a few years - "Sausage jalapeno poppers" aka ABTs. Certainly not traditional Thanksgiving fare, but nobody complains.

    Sausage Jalapeno Poppers Recipe - Allrecipes.com
    abt.jpg
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  22. #122  
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    Ha. That reminds me. A friend of my mother's also had a big argument with her family about a hot or cold Xmas dinner. Round and round it went until she settled it. "We have to serve out 30 plates for you lot. You can have a hot dinner cold or a cold dinner cold. Which will it be?"
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  23. #123  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    I have been making these for Thanksgiving for a few years - "Sausage jalapeno poppers" aka ABTs. Certainly not traditional Thanksgiving fare, but nobody complains.

    Sausage Jalapeno Poppers Recipe - Allrecipes.com
    abt.jpg
    Awesome looking recipe Harold and I love the simplicity of the ingredients and methodology. Mac will find it acceptable, no doubt, because it has bacon, lol... No doubt he might try a whole slice per jalapeno, given that most cooks like to modify and tweak recipes.
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  24. #124  
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    I couldn't resist this one.

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  25. #125  
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    For today's Atheist Sunday Lunch, we had company from out of town...so I made pot roast. It came out really good...fork tender.



    I pulled out the good dishes and set a nice table. It's Veteran's day here in the states, so I honored dad by having him join us.

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  26. #126  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Very nice, Mac.

    The place setting for absent friends is an old tradition among many. When hubby and I got married, we placed a chair slightly apart from the seating for the rest of our guests, all of whom understood, without saying, the significance of the act. Remembering and the sharing of memories across spans of generations may be the most significant trait that sets us apart from other species, though of course this is a subjective observation, there being no scientific means as yet to verify this hypothesis.
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  27. #127  
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    Check these out, Mac, a new product to our store. Too bad that they probably are not available to you in the U.S.

    Just think what one could do with these, crushed and used as a coating for fried/baked chicken or chops, a crumb topping for casseroles or in place of croutons in a salad....



    PC World of Flavours Maple Bacon Flavour - PC - Products
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  28. #128  
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    Oh hail yeah!
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  29. #129  
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    Here's an easy one for the beginner cooks. I cooked this with my left hand...as I have somehow injured my right bicep tendon, and can't lift my arm above my waist.

    Chicken alfredo spagetti w/ peas:

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  30. #130  
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    Thanksgiving FAILS, who knew it could be so dangerous?

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  31. #131  
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    Pfffft!!!! Amatuers....all of them!
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  32. #132  
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    I don't know call me picky but I don't see anything appealing at all in a deep fried turkey. I do think the flames look fun but wouldn't bother with the turkey.

    I decided on a whim to do something different this year. I skipped the turkey and the ham and got a goose and rabbit. I took for granted someone here may give me some hint on what I should do with them, I have never cooked either.
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  33. #133  
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    You need to be a bit careful with rabbit. The taste can be wonderful, but it's very, very lean so roasting needs to be undertaken with great care to make sure it doesn't dry out. Something along the lines of baking it in a very strong, very securely fastened foil envelope with appropriate herbs, moisture and oil/fat might be an idea. Can't recall seeing anything like that, but I'll have a look. We haven't had bunny for quite a while.

    Seeing as goose is so fatty, there'd be a temptation to cook them in the same dish but I'd worry about the rabbit taste being overwhelmed - as well as the rabbit being cooked through long before the goose.
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  34. #134  
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    Well this looks OK and it'll get the approval of all the bacon fanatics around here - bacon instead of foil. Works for me.

    Seasoned baked rabbit recipe
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  35. #135  
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    How long ago was it the big news was that Bacon Causes Cancer?
    Now, everything is wrapped in bacon.
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  36. #136  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Y'all be sure to take lots of photos of your Thanksgiving feast, and post them here.
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  37. #137  
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    I don't know call me picky but I don't see anything appealing at all in a deep fried turkey. I do think the flames look fun but wouldn't bother with the turkey.

    I decided on a whim to do something different this year. I skipped the turkey and the ham and got a goose and rabbit. I took for granted someone here may give me some hint on what I should do with them, I have never cooked either.

    Oh...you have to try it. It's not greasy, like you would think...it's just super juicy with a wonderful crisp skin....plus it's really fast. You can cook a 14 pound turkey in 45 minutes. I'll never go back to anything else.
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  38. #138  
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    Pecan pies and corn pudding for tomorrow:

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  39. #139  
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    Ok here is the goose I cooked. never had goose before but must admit I really liked it. was kinda like steak and turkey at the same time. mmmm

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  40. #140  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    There is much elegance to be found in simplicity.

    Your presentation is delightful and the goose looks to be absolutely delectable. Good job!
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  41. #141  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    MacGyver,

    I have never eaten corn pudding and am curious about the ingredients and it's method of preparation. Perhaps when the tryptophan has worn off you might give some consideration to sharing your recipe.

    Certainly I can do a recipe search but I have found that a tried and true recipe is best obtained from the source.
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  42. #142  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    There is much elegance to be found in simplicity.

    Your presentation is delightful and the goose looks to be absolutely delectable. Good job!
    I have to keep presentation simple, I'm not very creative when it comes to serving food lol. I figure its going to be destroyed the minute people dig in so I have trouble overcoming the practicality of being fancy.

    But thanks for the compliments, I always wonder if I should be proud of myself or not. I was proud of my first attempt to make sushi, until I felt very uncomfortable in my gut a short time after eating it lol.

    This was my first time cooking with wine. I didn't quite get it right but it didn't turn out as bad as I feared it would. The gravy was just a bit thin and I overcooked the meat a bit. But the flavor of the meat was awesome. I still haven't cooked the rabbit. I felt a bit overwhelmed at the prospect of goose so I will cook the rabbit this weekend sometime.

    edit to add a funny: So I didn't do too bad roasting the goose, making the gravy, and roasting the potatoes according to Emeril's instructions, and I did it all without any instructional help (had help doing things my weak little wrists prevent me from being able to do) but I totally flubbed the bake from frozen sara lee pumpkin pie and Neverfly had to race to the rescue of the precious desert because I apparently did it wrong. I can pull off complicated feats but can't follow simple instructions on a 1 step bake from frozen pie and almost ruined it.
    Last edited by seagypsy; November 23rd, 2012 at 03:49 AM.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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    The traditional thanksgiving ABTs on the grill. Sausage fried in the dutch oven, to practice my DO skills in case of power outage.
    SANY0001.jpgSANY0002.jpgSANY0003.jpg
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  44. #144  
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    I hope everyone had a great thanksgiving.

    SG...your bird looks great! Congrats. Beautiful color...Julia Child would be pleased.

    Sche...if you go back one page to the OP...I posted the reciepe for corn pudding there. It's easy to make.

    We had a wonderful Thanksgiving in Paris, Texas. The leaves were all turning color and were beautiful. I accomplished all my goals....at least 6 starches on my plate, and taking horse pictures. Too bad the Cowboys lost.
    Last edited by MacGyver1968; November 23rd, 2012 at 02:33 PM.
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  45. #145  
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    We wern't sure if we were going to Paris this year for T-day, so we went ahead and bought a small 12 pound turkey to cook here, just in case. We ended up going, so I'm going to cook it this weekend. Found a useful tip for brining a turkey this morning. I couldn't find a container that was big enough to put the turkey in, and small enough to fit in the fridge. So someone online suggested clearing out one of the veggie drawers at the bottom of your fridge and brining the turkey in that. Works great!
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  46. #146  
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    I'd had to fantasize about cooking a turkey.
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    I always cook in lingerie and f-me stripper shoes.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  48. #148  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I always cook in lingerie and f-me stripper shoes.
    A good way for you to keep everyone out of the kitchen when you're trying to cook?
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  49. #149  
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    Works EVERYTIME. I tell you what...you can crack the hell out of some walnuts with those stripper shoes.
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  50. #150  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I always cook in lingerie and f-me stripper shoes.
    Living alone I usually don't bother with any clothes at all.
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  51. #151  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I always cook in lingerie and f-me stripper shoes.
    Living alone I usually don't bother with any clothes at all.
    When I lived alone I preferred being nude all the time but even in the kitchen i put something on. Something about being naked around food disturbs me. Seems unhygienic or something.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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  52. #152  
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    "Waiter...there's a pube in my soup".
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    Not to mention that hot stove thing. Skin doesn't respond to hot metal well.
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  54. #154  
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    Yeah. I wonder why chefs and cooks are always covered up. It's a mystery.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  55. #155  
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    Oh..and nice job on the goose. SG....came out really good!
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Yeah. I wonder why chefs and cooks are always covered up. It's a mystery.
    Because no one wants to see Julia Child nekkid.
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  57. #157  
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    I'd tap that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Oh..and nice job on the goose. SG....came out really good!
    Thanks, but it was totally unexpected that i would do such a good job as to make it come out. I guess I made it feel welcomed. Until we ate it.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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  59. #159  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'd tap that.
    What, the goose?
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  60. #160  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'd tap that.
    What, the goose?
    If it wore lingerie and stripper shoes.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  61. #161  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Not to mention that hot stove thing. Skin doesn't respond to hot metal well.
    It's the splattering bacon grease that bothers me. Those splatters have no respect for where they land.
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  62. #162  
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    That's the first thing they teach you in cooking school...don't cook bacon naked.
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  63. #163  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    That's the first thing they teach you in cooking school...don't cook bacon naked.
    Never went to cooking school.
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  64. #164  
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    Neither did I. I just made that up.
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  65. #165  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'd tap that.
    What, the goose?
    If it wore lingerie and stripper shoes.
    And I thought the movie "American Pie" gave me horrid visuals.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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  66. #166  
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'd tap that.
    What, the goose?
    If it wore lingerie and stripper shoes.
    And I thought the movie "American Pie" gave me horrid visuals.
    Gives a whole new meaning to "dressing."
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  67. #167  
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    Just thought I'd throw in a Holiday ham with the bone in it. Mouth watering.

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  68. #168  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Just thought I'd throw in a Holiday ham with the bone in it. Mouth watering.
    That's a fat thigh. Wonder what you've been feeding those hogs, hmmm?
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  69. #169  
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    Hmmmm....ham. I like the part that's right above the bone...that's a little more red than the rest. Poor Muslims and Jews...they don't know what they are missing.
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  70. #170  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Hmmmm....ham. I like the part that's right above the bone...that's a little more red than the rest. Poor Muslims and Jews...they don't know what they are missing.
    Not to mention not ever having pork roast. Can you imagine never eating pork roast in your life?

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  71. #171  
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    I just remembered a story my dad told me once a long time ago. This guy at his work was an Eskimo and every 2 or 3 months he would go to the pound and pick out a fat dog for about 3 dollars at that time. He'd take it home and eat it. So I got to wondering what a cooked dog would look like.

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  72. #172  
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    As a general rule...I don't eat animals that fetch for me.
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  73. #173  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    As a general rule...I don't eat animals that fetch for me.
    Me either, it's on par with cannibalism as far as I'm concerned. But cheap meat is cheap meat, and many cultures don't have a problem eating the family pet during hard times.
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  74. #174  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    As a general rule...I don't eat animals that fetch for me.
    Me either, it's on par with cannibalism as far as I'm concerned. But cheap meat is cheap meat, and many cultures don't have a problem eating the family pet during hard times.
    You don't attack kill an eat an animal that is conditioned to trust you.
    It's why I'm opposed to slaughter houses (aside from the waste in it). I think if people want meat, they should have to hunt it.

    To go to the pound and buy a dog (While the clerk happily tells the pup he's going to a new home)... A dog that's conditioned to trust owners...

    Let me just say I can't say on open forum what I'd have done to the guy while he's here in MY culture. Rest assured, he might think twice about picking up any hot dogs at the local pound.

    Being a hunter/predator comes with a certain code.
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  75. #175  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    As a general rule...I don't eat animals that fetch for me.
    Me either, it's on par with cannibalism as far as I'm concerned. But cheap meat is cheap meat, and many cultures don't have a problem eating the family pet during hard times.
    You don't attack kill an eat an animal that is conditioned to trust you.
    It's why I'm opposed to slaughter houses (aside from the waste in it). I think if people want meat, they should have to hunt it.

    To go to the pound and buy a dog (While the clerk happily tells the pup he's going to a new home)... A dog that's conditioned to trust owners...

    Let me just say I can't say on open forum what I'd have done to the guy while he's here in MY culture. Rest assured, he might think twice about picking up any hot dogs at the local pound.

    Being a hunter/predator comes with a certain code.
    In that case then most of us have been raised wrong and I'm to old to change now. But I do prefer the supermarket with choice cuts of meat on display for the buying public. I've never hunted an animal for food or any other reason, but have seen a fresh killed Havoline dressed and butchered when I was about 11 or 12. I wouldn't want to have to start doing my own hunting and butchering just to eat meat.
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  76. #176  
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    Here are some photos from my Thanksgiving in Paris, Texas.

    The men gather around the deep fryer and enjoy a refreshing adult beverage:


    It was quite a spread:


    Old dogs waited for their turkey neck:


    and "Wide Load" didn't even bother to get up:


    The geese were out in force:


    and for Sche...Went out and visited "Cool Hand Luke" and his mom:


    Both mom and son love attention:


    The trees were pretty:


    another horse shot:


    CHL all up in my grill...he's like a big ole dog.


    It was great day overall.
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  77. #177  
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    Mac

    Those are a couple of very fat moochers. Must be a very tough being a dog around your family and friends. to much food and not enough exercise.
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  78. #178  
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    They are both really old, and both have torn ACL's in the past...so they aren't really mobile. I call the brown one "wide load"...i'm not sure what his real name is....but he's always been a fat ass...but he's REALLY fat now.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  79. #179  
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    My Joan makes the best Salmon Patties outside of Alaska.

    Best meal last night ( Saturday night here in Melbourne ), Patties made from Alaska Red Salmon, breadcrumbs, diced onion, herbs, spices, suggestion only of red chilli powder, and of course, eggs to bind.
    Served with Blanched Beans( crisp ), Dutch cream potatoes, mashed, with butter, Tomato and onion slice baked in casserole in oven, covered in breadcrumbs.
    Fresh buttered bread if required.

    Just melts in your mouth. Tastes compliment each other. A nd not expensive.

    Not bad from a lady who cannot taste or smell anything at all. westwind.
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  80. #180  
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    Quote Originally Posted by westwind View Post
    My Joan makes the best Salmon Patties outside of Alaska.

    Best meal last night ( Saturday night here in Melbourne ), Patties made from Alaska Red Salmon, breadcrumbs, diced onion, herbs, spices, suggestion only of red chilli powder, and of course, eggs to bind.
    Served with Blanched Beans( crisp ), Dutch cream potatoes, mashed, with butter, Tomato and onion slice baked in casserole in oven, covered in breadcrumbs.
    Fresh buttered bread if required.

    Just melts in your mouth. Tastes compliment each other. A nd not expensive.

    Not bad from a lady who cannot taste or smell anything at all. westwind.
    Did you take any pictures? Even if your still having a problem posting, you have to know you will be posting them sooner or later.
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  81. #181  
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    I've fried a couple of turkeys, but never had the nerve to do it indoors.
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  82. #182  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    Old dogs waited for their turkey neck:
    Looks like you ran over his bowl with the quad-bike! The poor dog needs a new bowl (although looking at the electric blanket, he is not so poor!)
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  83. #183  
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    I'm a Renaissance man today..Cooking a 12 pound turkey with all the sides...Fixing my sister's laptop, and watching F1 all at the same time.

    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  84. #184  
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    Everything came out good:
    My first turkey:


    Cornbread dressing and green bean casserole:
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  85. #185  
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    Still enjoying the leftovers from my favorite holiday. The way Black Friday is creeping into Thanksgiving really peeves me off. The second everyone finishes their slice of pie, it's Christmas-this and Christmas-that. What an underappreciated holiday Thanksgiving is.

    Anyways, I made a massive 20 pound turkey and it turned out pretty decent. Unfortunately, everyone was over an hour late so it dried out a little. Also made mashed potatoes two ways (one with butternut squash and nutmeg), my homemade dressing, REAL mac and cheese (no boxed stuff) with white wine and truffle, and pumpkin soup served in a big pumpkin (very fun).

    Already looking forward to next year.
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  86. #186  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    I'm a Renaissance man today..Cooking a 12 pound turkey with all the sides...Fixing my sister's laptop, and watching F1 all at the same time.


    You also blend the conventional with the convenient in your cooking I observe. I am waiting for our PC Cranberry Stuffing to arrive. It went MIA for a year and it is a very nice product for something in a box.



    President's Choice - PC Cranberry Stuffing Mix customer reviews - product reviews - read top consumer ratings

    Thanks for all the pictures, especially the horse pics!
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  87. #187  
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    Anyone else make homemade stuffing? I love mine, but it seems like people all want Stovetop. Curse you, Kraft!

    When you put an hour of your life into something and the first thing people say when they see it is, "Where's the Stovetop?" you have to excersize a lot of restraint in order to not throw them out of your house by the ear.

    A picture of mine:
    Attached Images
    Last edited by Flick Montana; November 26th, 2012 at 05:06 PM.
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  88. #188  
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    Yes, I actually have a traditional recipe which requires a bit of cooked sausage (also cooked giblets if available) apple, onion, celery and carrot in equal measure, chunks of bread dried in the oven, a few raisins, some molasses and of course poultry seasoning to taste with a bit of extra wild sage thrown in.

    For the last several years, I have been working Christmas eve and going back in to work for 1:00 a.m. on the 26th so just no time or energy to get into the cooking mood. This year, Christmas falls on my days off and I was just thinking that I might trot out my over-sized Kitchenaid with grinder attachment and go the whole nine yards.
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  89. #189  
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    Pretty much my recipe as well sans the meat. I'm glad to see there are other sane people out there when it comes to the Great Stuffing Debacle that took place when Stovetop became the accepted form at most dinner tables.

    Also, I just got a smoker and meat grinder for my birthday and I'm very much looking forward to making my sausage in the spring. Never done it before, though, so I'm a bit intimidated.

    On an unrelated note, I think fresh thyme may have the lowest ROI of all the fresh herbs. Took me 15 mins just to get enough leaves off the stems for my turkey garnish.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  90. #190  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Anyone else make homemade stuffing? I love mine, but it seems like people all want Stovetop. Curse you, Kraft!

    When you put an hour of your life into something and the first thing people say when they see it is, "Where's the Stovetop?" you have to exercise a lot of restraint in order to not throw them out of your house by the ear.

    A picture of mine:
    2320_553839169974_4443_n.jpg
    Flick, I can't see what's in the pan. I didn't know they made camera's that could take pictures that small. However my imagination want's to taste it.
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  91. #191  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Pretty much my recipe as well sans the meat. I'm glad to see there are other sane people out there when it comes to the Great Stuffing Debacle that took place when Stovetop became the accepted form at most dinner tables.

    Also, I just got a smoker and meat grinder for my birthday and I'm very much looking forward to making my sausage in the spring. Never done it before, though, so I'm a bit intimidated.

    On an unrelated note, I think fresh thyme may have the lowest ROI of all the fresh herbs. Took me 15 mins just to get enough leaves off the stems for my turkey garnish.
    So thyme takes too much time?
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  92. #192  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Anyone else make homemade stuffing? I love mine, but it seems like people all want Stovetop. Curse you, Kraft!

    When you put an hour of your life into something and the first thing people say when they see it is, "Where's the Stovetop?" you have to exercise a lot of restraint in order to not throw them out of your house by the ear.

    A picture of mine:
    2320_553839169974_4443_n.jpg
    Flick, I can't see what's in the pan. I didn't know they made camera's that could take pictures that small. However my imagination want's to taste it.
    click it to see a bigger version.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  93. #193  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post

    click it to see a bigger version.
    Yeah! That worked, but what's wrong with posting it big to start with?
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  94. #194  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post

    click it to see a bigger version.
    Yeah! That worked, but what's wrong with posting it big to start with?
    Laziness. Pure and simple.

    I fixed it for you, though, at my own great expense.
    arKane likes this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  95. #195  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Flick, that stuffing looks really good. I've only tried to make stuffing once, and ended up using too much chicken broth concentrate for my stock...it was so salty, it'd make you pucker. I'll try again someday. I just used the Stove top this time, because I had it on hand. If I was cooking for company, I'd probably go ahead and cook the cornbread, and make it from scratch.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Do you folks cook your stuffing inside the bird or in a casserole dish on the side? Inside the bird is my favorite although I have had pretty good luck cooking any excess in a casserole added about an hour before the bird is expected to be done and basting it with some of the turkey drippings.

    Always looking to learn from the experience of others.
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  97. #197  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    Technically...stuffing always goes in the bird. If you cook it outside in a pan, it's called dressing. Since we normally deep fry, we cook dressing.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    The way Black Friday is creeping into Thanksgiving really peeves me off. The second everyone finishes their slice of pie, it's Christmas-this and Christmas-that. What an underappreciated holiday Thanksgiving is.
    Agreed. On the way to the relatives' house Thanksgiving day, we had the radio tuned to a station that was playing Christmas music all day. That had to go. That's just plain wrong.
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  99. #199  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Do you folks cook your stuffing inside the bird or in a casserole dish on the side? Inside the bird is my favorite although I have had pretty good luck cooking any excess in a casserole added about an hour before the bird is expected to be done and basting it with some of the turkey drippings.

    Always looking to learn from the experience of others.
    I only cooked stuffing in the bird one time and though it tasted great I think i got food poisoning from it. I lived alone that year and didn't have any kids, and family was too far away so I just did it for myself thankfully. Later when the interwebz got so easy to access I learned that cooking in the bird is actually pretty dangerous because it doesn't always get cooked all the way through and the raw juices of the turkey can pool in the cavity and all that stuff. So I have never attempted it since.

    But another reason is that I cook a 15 lb turkey for 14 hours sometimes, I roast it at 250 and only turn up the heat in teh last hour to finish it off and brown it. Usually it comes out very juicy and tender that way. but I can imagine cooking at a low temp even for that long, if the cavity is stuffed full the heat may not permeate it completely.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
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  100. #200  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Do you folks cook your stuffing inside the bird or in a casserole dish on the side? Inside the bird is my favorite although I have had pretty good luck cooking any excess in a casserole added about an hour before the bird is expected to be done and basting it with some of the turkey drippings.

    Always looking to learn from the experience of others.
    I only cooked stuffing in the bird one time and though it tasted great I think i got food poisoning from it. I lived alone that year and didn't have any kids, and family was too far away so I just did it for myself thankfully. Later when the interwebz got so easy to access I learned that cooking in the bird is actually pretty dangerous because it doesn't always get cooked all the way through and the raw juices of the turkey can pool in the cavity and all that stuff. So I have never attempted it since.

    But another reason is that I cook a 15 lb turkey for 14 hours sometimes, I roast it at 250 and only turn up the heat in teh last hour to finish it off and brown it. Usually it comes out very juicy and tender that way. but I can imagine cooking at a low temp even for that long, if the cavity is stuffed full the heat may not permeate it completely.
    My mother is the food safety guru of all time and always used to cook a stuffed bird but she observed a few basic rules.

    1) The bird was thoroughly washed and dried to remove any body cavity juices and surface bacteria.
    2) Stuffing was made and placed in the bird immediately prior to going in a pre-heated oven.
    3) Oven temperature was 325 degrees throughout the cooking period and turned up briefly at the end of the cooking period if the bird required browning.
    4) The bird was allowed to rest for ten minutes prior to carving during which time ALL of the stuffing was removed to a bowl.
    5) Immediately after dinner, the bird is sectioned and placed into the refrigerator.

    I have used a low temperature oven to cook prime rib roast or red meat stews, but the meat is seared before I place it in the oven.

    Sorry to hear that you had a bad experience, seagypsy, and glad that you recovered as food poisoning can be very serious.

    Food Poisoning May Have Long-Term Consequences - ABC News
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