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Thread: Science 2.0 - can the internet give us a new science?

  1. #1 Science 2.0 - can the internet give us a new science? 
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    Hi all,

    I did a bit of a search and didnt see much on this topic.

    I have just completed a post on how the current scientific system has problems (peer review) and how the internet may assist, sorting out some of the problems, and possibly opening a new world. Slothy Science: Science needs a software upgrade

    What do you think?

    Thanks
    Dustin


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  3. #2  
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    The article is pretty well written.

    As for the key points.
    -Yes the peer review process is still too slow. And science is slowly embracing speedier means to at least get informal reviews of their work.
    -scientific fraud is exceedingly rare.
    -even if the data is available, it doesn't mean anyone else has the means or desire to analyze it all--most don't.

    And considering the misuse of data by anti-science and political groups that like to cherry pick through data, emails and whatnot to create confusion--there's some insentive to do the opposite and keep data processing and informal communications strickly hidden.


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  4. #3  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    It always struck me as strange how quickly the anti-science people like climate change deniers jumped on scientists when they thought there was false data being used. Scientists are usually the first to get up in arms when questionable data surfaces in published work.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  5. #4  
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    Thank you for the replies. There are a few places around the world that are going to an open data situation. So it will be interesting to see how it works.

    Re
    "even if the data is available, it doesn't mean anyone else has the means or desire to analyze it all--most don't."
    I agree that most will not, but open data permits a situation that if someone wants to analyse it, it can be. At the moment that just doesnt happen.
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  6. #5  
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    At the moment that just doesnt happen.

    That depends a lot of the field...climate and meteorological data is mostly collected by government agencies and very easy to get both in near real time and in post processing. The challenge is putting the data into accessible forms that change over time especially for archival data sets. Corporate research will probably protect their research regardless of the system available. There's probably a lot of examples between those two extremes,where more open data access would be helpful.
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  7. #6  
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    collected by government agencies and very easy to get both in near real time and in post processing.
    But that sometimes causes problems when governments try to turn agencies like meteorology into money spinners. They'll happily grant access to some people but hamstring them when it comes to distributing the data to others. Same thing goes for some economic data. If you want anything more than what goes into UN or CIA Factbook or agency published data, you have to pay for it.
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