Notices
Results 1 to 21 of 21
Like Tree4Likes
  • 2 Post By Harold14370
  • 2 Post By Dishmaster

Thread: Returning to Germany.

  1. #1 Returning to Germany. 
    Forum Masters Degree mmatt9876's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    687
    I am about 35% German. Can I return to Germany and become a citizen on that alone. I was not born there and I do not currently speak German.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,590
    Ask the German consulate in a city near you.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Professor Wild Cobra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,140
    How do you get 35 percent? Are you 45/128 German?

    Anyway, being a more Socialistic government, I think you will have a difficult time unless you bring in skills or money to their economy.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,256
    It depends where you live now. I think EU laws prohibit the German government from turning down immigrants from within the EU. It's the same reason we're flooded with Polish where I live at the moment...
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    2,256
    It depends on the country, some like Korea provide visas to people who are ethnically Korean. I think Greece has a similar policy of repatriation. I don't believe Germany has such a policy though.
    "I almost went to bed
    without remembering
    the four white violets
    I put in the button-hole
    of your green sweater

    and how i kissed you then
    and you kissed me
    shy as though I'd
    never been your lover "
    - Leonard Cohen
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Interesting thread! As far as I know, and I am German, Germany is one of the countries that grants German citizenship to those that can prove German ancestors. But, don't ask me about details. This rule is commonly applied to those of German descent that migrated to eastern europe centuries ago and now want to be German citizens again. But there is a relatively strict rule that you cannot have two citizenships. If you want to become a German citizen, you must abandon your US citizenship. And yes, as a EU citizen you can freely choose where to live in the EU. In this sense, there are no borders anymore.

    Anybody can become German citizen, but you have to pass a test (history, language, politics). Working in Germany without having a EU citizenship is more difficult.

    And please, Germany is NOT a socialistic country.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nirgendwo und Ueberall
    Posts
    1,300
    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster View Post
    Interesting thread! As far as I know, and I am German, Germany is one of the countries that grants German citizenship to those that can prove German ancestors. But, don't ask me about details. This rule is commonly applied to those of German descent that migrated to eastern europe centuries ago and now want to be German citizens again. But there is a relatively strict rule that you cannot have two citizenships. If you want to become a German citizen, you must abandon your US citizenship. And yes, as a EU citizen you can freely choose where to live in the EU. In this sense, there are no borders anymore.

    Anybody can become German citizen, but you have to pass a test (history, language, politics). Working in Germany without having a EU citizenship is more difficult.

    And please, Germany is NOT a socialistic country.
    I could pass the language and history portion with a brief review. What does one need to know about politics? I hope to work for the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology one day.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster View Post
    Interesting thread! As far as I know, and I am German, Germany is one of the countries that grants German citizenship to those that can prove German ancestors. But, don't ask me about details. This rule is commonly applied to those of German descent that migrated to eastern europe centuries ago and now want to be German citizens again. But there is a relatively strict rule that you cannot have two citizenships. If you want to become a German citizen, you must abandon your US citizenship. And yes, as a EU citizen you can freely choose where to live in the EU. In this sense, there are no borders anymore.

    Anybody can become German citizen, but you have to pass a test (history, language, politics). Working in Germany without having a EU citizenship is more difficult.

    And please, Germany is NOT a socialistic country.
    I could pass the language and history portion with a brief review. What does one need to know about politics? I hope to work for the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology one day.
    With "politics" I meant one should know something about the constitutional set-up of the German state. If you are interested, there are frequent public tests published on on-line portals of newspapers. Here is one:
    http://www.welt.de/vermischtes/artic...Antworten.html

    But you can work there without being German. I work at the Max-Planck-Instuitute for Astronomy, and there are lots of non-German colleages from all over the world.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nirgendwo und Ueberall
    Posts
    1,300
    50/70...nicht schlecht fuer ein Anfaenger, nein?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler View Post
    50/70...nicht schlecht fuer ein Anfaenger, nein?
    Das sollte reichen. Herzlichen Glückwunsch! Du wärst nun ein Deutscher.

    Really not bad. This test criticised a lot, because under normal circumstances even many native Germans would fail the test.
    Last edited by Dishmaster; July 22nd, 2011 at 04:59 PM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,822
    I got 42/70 right. A lot of the time I was just guessing. I can't speak German, but remembered some from college. That was over 40 years ago.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nirgendwo und Ueberall
    Posts
    1,300
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    I got 42/70 right. A lot of the time I was just guessing. I can't speak German, but remembered some from college. That was over 40 years ago.
    Gut Arbeit!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    I got 42/70 right. A lot of the time I was just guessing. I can't speak German, but remembered some from college. That was over 40 years ago.
    Gut Arbeit!
    The vocabulary is right, the grammar isn't. It should be "Gute Arbeit". The gender is transferred from the noun to the adjective. "Arbeit" is female, i.e. "die Arbeit".
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nirgendwo und Ueberall
    Posts
    1,300
    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    I got 42/70 right. A lot of the time I was just guessing. I can't speak German, but remembered some from college. That was over 40 years ago.
    Gut Arbeit!
    The vocabulary is right, the grammar isn't. It should be "Gute Arbeit". The gender is transferred from the noun to the adjective. "Arbeit" is female, i.e. "die Arbeit".
    Was fuer ein Fehler...

    I always thought that phrase followed a different rule for some reason..lol...must have misheard my teacher...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Quagma SpeedFreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,786
    Heh, I had a problem with learning German and French - I couldn't get my head around the need to assign every single object in the universe with a gender, which changes all the words around it! I mean, how am I supposed to remember that, in French, a moustache is female?! How do you guys remember the gender of inanimate objects?
    Last edited by SpeedFreek; July 31st, 2011 at 11:03 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,822
    I like the idea that work is female, though.
    drowsy turtle and x(x-y) like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,256
    The same way I remember the gender of animate objects - having started referring to someone as female, I don't suddenly start saying 'he' when talking about them. The example I would give, is pets; once that you know your, or another's, pet dog or cat is male, from that point on there is no ambiguity with this fact - even though it is not immediately obvious from looking at him that he is male.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedFreek View Post
    Heh, I had a problem with learning German and French - I couldn't get my head around the need to assign every single object in the universe with a gender, which changes all the words around it! I mean, how am I supposed to remember that, in French, a moustache is female?! How do you guys remember the gender of inanimate objects?
    I can fully understand that this quite a problem for someone learning German. In particular, when we have THREE genders. I have no idea how you really can remember that without having grown up with the language. I guess, practice is the only solution. I am just glad that I am a native speaker.

    Here are some awkward examples:
    the girl - das Mädchen (neuter)
    the dog - der Hund (masculine)
    the cat - die Katze (feminine)
    the kitten - das Kätzchen (neuter)

    Not logical at all.

    see also:
    German grammar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Paleoichneum and x(x-y) like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    The French and German language are strange. Need to assign gender to every word always confused me. I'd blame it on the people who developed the language but having read into Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs they have a pretty similar story to tell when it comes to gender and adding similar words like 'der, die and das'. Or 'le' this and 'le' that. Call this ignorant but I believe English should be the dominant language for the planet. It's such a versatile language.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Behind the enlightening rod.
    Posts
    936
    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by gottspieler View Post
    50/70...nicht schlecht fuer ein Anfaenger, nein?
    Das sollte reichen. Herzlichen Glückwunsch! Du wärst nun ein Deutscher.

    Really not bad. This test criticised a lot, because under normal circumstances even many native Germans would fail the test.
    Same is no doubt true for citizens of USA by birth. Regardless of political left/right orientation, Prince thinks those wishing to immigrate to any nation will do well to have skills which are in demand, e.g. medicine, engineering, etc. See "brain drain" for further elaboration.
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it.- Thucydides
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Heidelberg, Germany
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime View Post
    Call this ignorant but I believe English should be the dominant language for the planet. It's such a versatile language.
    I tend to disagree on the second statement. At least compared to other languages like German. Isn't being easy and versatile an oxymoron?
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •