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Thread: Competition: The driving force behind progress.

  1. #1 Competition: The driving force behind progress. 
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    Should a competitive spirit be a trait held highly in society? Do we not pay enough attention the importance of being competitive? Do people neglect the importance of competition? Why would/should anyone settle for being second best?


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  3. #2 Re: Competition: The driving force behind progress. 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Ihenacho
    Should a competitive spirit be a trait held highly in society?
    Yes, but by no means exclusively or primarily. If you take a typical breakfast the odds are that that is only possible because of the cooperative efforts of thousands of people. A powerfully distinctive thing about humans is their ability to cooperate on a grand scale.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Ihenacho
    Do we not pay enough attention the importance of being competitive?
    Who is 'we'? The relative importance attached to competitiveness varies greatly from culture to culture.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Ihenacho
    Do people neglect the importance of competition?
    Not to any great extent, in my experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd Ihenacho
    Why would/should anyone settle for being second best?
    Because the aility to be realistic is also a powerfully distinctive thing about many humans.


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  4. #3  
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    When I say 'we' I am referring to mankind as a whole. As with every Culture, there consistently appears to be an individual or group of individuals who reap significant benefits by acknowledging the benefits of being competitive. For example in Nigeria, with its 120+ inhabitants, it wouldn’t be an overstatement to say that only less than 2 per cent of the population are living comfortably ( by which I mean, do not have to worry about basic financial issues, such as where their next meal will come from). I have lived there for a significant proportion of my life and so understand that other extraneous variable come into play when trying to surmise why this statistic is so. However, if less than 2 per cent of the individuals are clearly living relatively good lives, shouldn’t this set a target for those who are less fortunate to aim towards? As much as I hate the saying 'aim for the stars and if you miss, you’ll land on the moon', in this discussion I find it to be quite apt. Surely by endorsing ones competitive nature and indeed aiming towards being able to live a significantly better life, financially, even if one did not achieve living in a million dollar mansion, he/she would have in process have significantly increased their chances of breaking free from the vice of poverty?
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  5. #4  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Competitiveness no doubt is one necessity for people to improve their circumstances but it is far from being the only one. Don’t you think that the 98% who live in poverty, regardless of how much competitive spirit they have, are starting at a distinct disadvantage when government officials steal all the oil money that Shell doesn’t export? How can competitiveness change this? Competitive spirit lacking education and basic material comforts will most likely be directed into violence. In the US we have gang violence. In Nigeria you have religious strife and ethnic strife – convenient for the ruling class to keep the Christian poor preoccupied with hating the Muslim poor. Their competitive spirit is directed against their religious enemies instead of against a corrupt system designed to keep them poor.
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