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Thread: Advice in math based majors

  1. #1 Advice in math based majors 
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    I'm very interested in majoring in a math based science such as physics, computer science, math itself, etc. and i would like to know a lot more about the learning processes as well as careers of certain majors. Thanks in advance to everyone who replies.

    Physics.
    If I major in physics I'm planning on taking it all the way and getting a doctorates and i have several questions concerning the application of such a degree.

    1. I have an IQ in the 140's, I would appreciate if you refrained from talking about the inaccuracy and lack of dependability of IQ test, I have taken numerous all scoring me withing a fairly small range, I'm sure it's a good enough estimate to go off of. So my question is; with such an IQ will i be able to have a decent career in theoretical or advanced practical physics, because with all the geniuses out there working on these problems and seeing as most of them (at least the ones I am interested in) are almost completely based on math, I do not see how I could make any useful contribution.

    2. I'm considering double majoring in physics and math, if physics were to be my top priority then for how long should I keep the double major if it's a good idea to double major at all.

    Mathematics
    I enjoy math a lot, not the math I have been learning in high school but math i have pursued on my free time such as number theory and I am interested in majoring in it.

    1. I'm quite confident that i won't be able make any contributions as a mathematician seeing as how it takes the brightest geniuses to solve the problems that mathematicians solve so if I were to major in math i would look for careers with practical application or one in educations. My question is what careers am i most likely to undertake with a doctorate in math (excluding teacher, professor or tutor)?

    Computer Science
    Computer science is also a field I'm considering majoring in.

    1. I'm sure computer science has many different branches and I am interested in the ones that are the most math based. Could you please describe to me the branches of computer science that are the most math based?

    2. For me it's important that the application of the knowledge as well as the learning process be fun. I've always liked the thought of scripting and devising systems to accomplish tasks and I have done that minus the scripting, meaning i devised systems for scripters to script but I could never get myself to learn scripting because the process of learning all those commands and formats were boring and tedious to me. My question is; will I have to deal a lot with learning tedious things in the learning process such as scripting even if I try to avoid it?

    Economics.
    This field i know the least about, I hardly know anything about majoring in this field and the upper level applications of it so any information about it is helpful.

    Again thanks to everyone who replied and I apologize if I made any spelling or grammatical errors, it's past midnight and I'm struggling to stay awake.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard i_feel_tiredsleepy's Avatar
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    You should go for an engineering degree. Theoretical math and physics are predominantly academia bound fields, there aren't even private research institutes heavily involved in those fields.

    My cousin has a pure maths degree, he does some sort of number crunching for some engineering firm in Ontario, so there are some jobs out there I suppose.

    A friend of mine who is currently studying computer engineering does have to do a lot of scripting, so I'd say yes you'd have to deal with that.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    I have an IQ in the 140's, I would appreciate if you refrained from talking about the inaccuracy and lack of dependability of IQ test, I have taken numerous all scoring me withing a fairly small range, I'm sure it's a good enough estimate to go off of. So my question is; with such an IQ will i be able to have a decent career in theoretical or advanced practical physics, because with all the geniuses out there working on these problems and seeing as most of them (at least the ones I am interested in) are almost completely based on math, I do not see how I could make any useful contribution.
    Feynman had an IQ of 125, and he set a revelation in physics with his QED. But i dont think the IQ here doesn't greatly matter in majoring anything really. Of course certain level of intelligence needs to be met by the person, but you will realize its the hard work that will get you in the top eventually.

    Mathematics
    I enjoy math a lot, not the math I have been learning in high school but math i have pursued on my free time such as number theory and I am interested in majoring in it
    .

    Same, i love maths also, and yes high school mathematics is boring indeed so i also like to study maths alone in my free time, but i would have to say number theory isnt my best, rather im doing further study on Calculus.
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    You should go for an engineering degree. Theoretical math and physics are predominantly academia bound fields, there aren't even private research institutes heavily involved in those fields.

    My cousin has a pure maths degree, he does some sort of number crunching for some engineering firm in Ontario, so there are some jobs out there I suppose.

    A friend of mine who is currently studying computer engineering does have to do a lot of scripting, so I'd say yes you'd have to deal with that.
    I may have misused the term "theoretical", what i mean is working on subjects such as quantum mechanics and performing experiments or doing math to determine things about elementary particles, gravity, etc.

    Same, i love maths also, and yes high school mathematics is boring indeed so i also like to study maths alone in my free time, but i would have to say number theory isnt my best, rather im doing further study on Calculus.
    I've known some elementary things about Number Theory for a little while and found a book about it at my local bookstore, being the sometimes absent minded person that I am I didn't notice that the book is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduates until after i brought it home, but since I already have it I figured i will take on the challenge and try to complete it, the proofs are annoying to say the least.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    You should go for an engineering degree.
    I don't know how I could have forgotten to mention it, but engineering is also a major I'm very much interested in, especially electronics engineering.
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  7. #6 Re: Advice in math based majors 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleverusername
    2. I'm considering double majoring in physics and math, if physics were to be my top priority then for how long should I keep the double major if it's a good idea to double major at all.
    I'm currently in my final year of a physics/mathematics degree and from my own experiences i probably should have stuck with just the maths. Being good at maths is a definate bonus when it comes to doing physics, but it's understanding the physical concepts of a problem that is crucial to solving physics problems.

    I guess what i'm trying to say is, if you love maths then do maths, if you love physics then do physics...etc. But i'd be cautious about doing a maths based science if maths is the focus of your interest
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  8. #7  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    You should go for an engineering degree. Theoretical math and physics are predominantly academia bound fields, there aren't even private research institutes heavily involved in those fields.
    our company has an Operational Research department, where's there's quite a few maths people doing stuff like decision analysis, simulation, system dynamics etc.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman Hersal Gibs's Avatar
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    Okay i will suggest you should go for engineering with math and physics and if possible do some computer course. Now a days computer also very need in life.

    Regards,
    Hersal Gibs
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