Notices
Results 1 to 34 of 34

Thread: The feeling of being watched?

  1. #1 The feeling of being watched? 
    Forum Professor WVBIG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,059
    I think all or at least most of us at one time or another has had the feeling of being watched & when we turned around, either a person or an animal was watching us. What are the leading theories for the cause of this?


    Steven
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,810
    i'm an adherent of the "just because i'm paranoid doesn't mean the bastards aren't out to get me" theory


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Professor WVBIG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,059
    I was watching a deer hunting show once where the hunters had gotten pics of a trophy Whitetail on a game cam & set out to specifically get it. Time was running out on the last day, so the one hunter shot a smaller buck. While field dressing it, he felt like he was being watched. When he looked up, the trophy buck was standing a few yards away looking at him
    Steven
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Not a lead theory, but I think we've all had that feeling. The important point is that it is a "Feeling." That suggest we're picking up patterns from the environment that are triggering our reptilian brain to an emotional response, a tense feeling, perhaps a shot of adrenaline and heightened awareness. If we were more primitive that would probably be enough to get us into a fight or flight mode and we wouldn’t be left standing wondering why the heck we feel that way (even as the cougar gets ready to spring onto your back), or sitting around wondering about it on a science forum.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Re: The feeling of being watched? 
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by WVBIG
    I think all or at least most of us at one time or another has had the feeling of being watched & when we turned around, either a person or an animal was watching us. What are the leading theories for the cause of this?
    My personal take is that this is more related to a confirmation bias than anything else.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias

    Basically, we turn around all the time when people are not looking at us, but the times when someone IS staring at us we remember it better (those experiences are more salient). So, in essence, we have a bias and only remember those encounters which confirm the concept.


    Now, there is actually a whole book on this topic which I read several years ago. It's called "The Sense of Being Stared At," and it's by a fellow named Rupert Sheldrake. He's got some wild ideas about these things called "morphic fields," and after I spent some time looking into it, I realized it's sort of rubbish. That's my opinion, though.

    http://www.amazon.com/Sense-Being-St.../dp/060960807X


    He has a site with other concepts and ideas, also thoughts for experiments (but I think the methodology of most is rather problematic):

    http://www.sheldrake.org/homepage.html


    He also wrote a book called "Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home."

    http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-That-Thei.../dp/0609805339
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6 Re: The feeling of being watched? 
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    My personal take is that this is more related to a confirmation bias than anything else.
    Confirmation bias wouldn't explain the "feeling," we have of being watched whether we confirm we really being watched or not.


    I don't think there's any doubt that our subconscious processes lots of sensory information and sometimes reaches conclusions, leading to an emotional reaction to prepare us for danger, that our conscience mind only starts to figure out after the emotion triggers us to pay attention and try to make head of tales to even confirm what we're feeling.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    I have never had such a feeling of being watched. My hypotheses would be as follows.
    1. You didn't have a feeling of being watched but instead a general wariness or caution that prompted you to look around. On those occasions when nobody was watching, you do not remember it as a feeling of being watched. If somebody or something is watching you, then, in retrospect, you recall your general feeling of uneasiness as a feeling of being watched.
    2. You have a feeling of being watched. You look around and, if there is any person or thing in the vicinity, you think they must be watching you, whether they are actually watching or not. I guess that would be the confirmation bias hypothesis.
    3. You have a feeling of being watched. By coincidence, somebody is watching you. This stands out in your memory much more than the numerous occasions when nobody was watching.
    4. Deer hunters have been known to embellish their hunting stories.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Professor WVBIG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,059
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    I have never had such a feeling of being watched. My hypotheses would be as follows.
    1. You didn't have a feeling of being watched but instead a general wariness or caution that prompted you to look around. On those occasions when nobody was watching, you do not remember it as a feeling of being watched. If somebody or something is watching you, then, in retrospect, you recall your general feeling of uneasiness as a feeling of being watched.
    2. You have a feeling of being watched. You look around and, if there is any person or thing in the vicinity, you think they must be watching you, whether they are actually watching or not. I guess that would be the confirmation bias hypothesis.
    3. You have a feeling of being watched. By coincidence, somebody is watching you. This stands out in your memory much more than the numerous occasions when nobody was watching.
    4. Deer hunters have been known to embellish their hunting stories.
    1)I remember feeling being watched, turning around & no one was there.
    2)The deer hunting incident was documented on video.
    3)I know of numerous incidents of people reporting feeling watched & not seeing anyone or anything. Then later finding an alleged Bigfoot track and wrecklessly(in my opinion) attributing the feeling of being watched to a Bigfoot. Also debunkers of paranormal activity attribute the feeling of being watched to a high electromagnetic field like in a basement where there is a breaker box. But hypersensitivity to electromagnetic fields surely can't be the explanation for every feeling like this
    Steven
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9 Re: The feeling of being watched? 
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    My personal take is that this is more related to a confirmation bias than anything else.
    Confirmation bias wouldn't explain the "feeling," we have of being watched whether we confirm we really being watched or not.
    I think it does, though. The point is... How many times have you had that "feeling" and turned around to find absolutely nothing? I'd say... most of the time, and yet those are the ones you reject from your mental dataset... Only the times where someone was, in fact, looking get remembered.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    I don't think there's any doubt that our subconscious processes lots of sensory information and sometimes reaches conclusions, leading to an emotional reaction to prepare us for danger, that our conscience mind only starts to figure out after the emotion triggers us to pay attention and try to make head of tales to even confirm what we're feeling.
    I sort of agree here, but suggest it's more about us having evolved a predisposition toward false positives. Those who looked over their shoulder to see an approaching tiger tended to outreproduce those who did not. Those who failed to look over their shoulder got eaten, so it was better to look and see nothing than not to look when danger was present.

    I also propose that it's not so much that "we feel others," but instead that we collect and aggregate all of the various auditory, temperature, and air pressure stimuli in an environment and whenever those come together in a way beyond our normal ... beyond our baseline... we just tend to turn around since something seems different or "off." We usually turn around to find nothing, but sometimes we see someone looking at us and it stands out as strange, so we remember it.

    On top of all that, I should mention that we as humans are sort of natural voyeurs. We naturally look at others. I people watch all of the time, like when sitting at airports or in line at the movie theater. There's bound to be someone who turns around and sees you looking at them... Same for others... We all watch each other. It's a part of who we are as a social species. We model behavior from others, and learn socially by watching those around us. It makes sense that we look at each other and watch... and when the primary behavior is to look at others, then it makes sense we'll sometimes catch people looking at us... It's all in the percentages and probabilities.

    There are a few reasons I don't think there is a magical or mystical force at work here. I "sense" that it's just the confluence of our aggregation of stimuli, our preference for over remembering positive hits, having been selected to implicitly know false positives are better than false negatives, and all of this taking place among a social animal who learns by watching others.

    The above are just a few that I recall from when I was looking through the literature on this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10 Re: The feeling of being watched? 
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    I think it does, though. The point is... How many times have you had that "feeling" and turned around to find absolutely nothing? I'd say... most of the time, and yet those are the ones you reject from your mental dataset... Only the times where someone was, in fact, looking get remembered.
    I know for a fact it usually amounts to nothing. But it doesn't matter anyhow because I'm hard wired to get that "I'm being watched" feeling. As you suggested, my ancestors survived because of the false positives didn't cost anything. That's why I reject the confirmation bias--even knowing the real ratio doesn't matter because our conscious awareness comes after the feeling. Even if I knew the ratio was 1 watched time to 1000 unwatched false positives, I'd still get that feeling all because it happens before I get a chance to consciously think about it.


    I also propose that it's not so much that "we feel others," but instead that we collect and aggregate all of the various auditory, temperature, and air pressure stimuli in an environment and whenever those come together in a way beyond our normal ... beyond our baseline... we just tend to turn around since something seems different or "off." We usually turn around to find nothing, but sometimes we see someone looking at us and it stands out as strange, so we remember it.
    A pretty good description of the process though I'd add the subconscious pattern recognition, feeling before becoming aware of the feeling and turn around. That "I'm being watched" feeling while taking a moonless walk through the park might get many of us to run without even trying to confirm--a rather primitive reaction--but one that allowed our ancestors to survive. Ever see a pet cat do that? Something triggers a fear (hackles up etc) and flight response--they don't stop or turn around to check things out.

    There are a few reasons I don't think there is a magical or mystical force at work here.
    I agree.


    among a social animal who learns by watching others.
    Nearly impossible to confirm, but I think the feeling of being watched evolved pretty early and is independent of the animal being social. That being said I'm not so sure I understood that part of your argument.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11 Re: The feeling of being watched? 
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    among a social animal who learns by watching others.
    Nearly impossible to confirm, but I think the feeling of being watched evolved pretty early and is independent of the animal being social. That being said I'm not so sure I understood that part of your argument.
    Yeah, I rushed through that a little bit. My apologies. The concept I was going for here was one of probabilities, and how our natural human tendencies make the probability of "catching" someone looking at us fairly high... whether or not this "sense of being stared at" truly exists.

    We are social creatures. We learn by modeling others, and by watching those around us. See the work of Albert Bandura for more on this concept.... Social learning theory. Monkey see, monkey do... That sort of thing. We watch those around us and learn from it... We're natural voyeurs, in a sense.

    The idea I was going for is that, since we humans have a strong tendency to watch others, we are very likely when we turn around to ultimately see someone who happens to be there watching or looking at us. We're hard wired to people watch, so we often turn around to catch others who happen to be people watching us. Further, we're predisposed to place special significance on that moment of eye contact which makes the encounter seem that much more salient, but that doesn't mean we have any special "senses."

    I think I'm still struggling to find my words on this, but the basic suggestion here is that it's less about us "sensing" that we're being watched, and more about there being a very high probability at any given time that we actually are being watched (due to the nature of our society and how we learn from others). When you couple that with the fact that we humans really only recall those experiences which confirm that we were being watched, and with the way we tend to omit from our dataset those countless times when we turned around to find nothing, it makes the event of an "actual positive" seem much more significant than it really is, and results in us unnecessarily positing a larger effect, mechanism, or phenomenon... where ultimately none is needed to explain what's happening.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nirgendwo und Ueberall
    Posts
    1,296
    Probably feel that way becasue parents drill into our heads as children that god is omnipresent. "God knows what you did!", etc...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Professor WVBIG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,059
    Is it possible we hear sounds that are so faint that we don't consciously realize we hear them and that's what makes us turn around?
    Steven
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Well, sound is a pressure wave, so it's quite possible we can detect it on our skin as tactile stimulation when the air brushes past. It also will cause a disturbance in the air, so may impact scent (the olfactory molecules jostling could cause us to pick up on movements through our nose). Also, it may bend just enough cilia in the ear drum to cause our auditory cortex to fire a bit, yeah.

    The real challenge is that someone merely looking at us doesn't generally cause a sound.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Professor WVBIG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    1,059
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Well, sound is a pressure wave, so it's quite possible we can detect it on our skin as tactile stimulation when the air brushes past. It also will cause a disturbance in the air, so may impact scent (the olfactory molecules jostling could cause us to pick up on movements through our nose). Also, it may bend just enough cilia in the ear drum to cause our auditory cortex to fire a bit, yeah.

    The real challenge is that someone merely looking at us doesn't generally cause a sound.
    Thanks everyone for your input
    Steven
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    It's Bigfoot Steve, he's finally coming for you! 8)

    Hey I'm kidding. I have sometimes had that feeling, its probably something to do with a defense mechanism from when in the wild. A sudden alert feeling without having anything set it off, can't say I've noticed animals having that feeling.

    It must have come about from us being rubbish animals back in the wild, an extra sensory feeling designed to protect us. Either that or paranoia was neccesary for survival... :?
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime
    its probably something to do with a defense mechanism from when in the wild. A sudden alert feeling without having anything set it off, can't say I've noticed animals having that feeling.
    And... uh... how would you know?


    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime
    It must have come about from us being rubbish animals back in the wild, an extra sensory feeling designed to protect us. Either that or paranoia was neccesary for survival... :?
    Wouldn't it be a good idea to determine whether the phenomenon exists at all before you postulate why it does?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    171
    Homo Sapiens has a very low sense of smell, good eyes during the day, poor at night, we are trichromatic which might be an handicap for seeing some patterns in the forest, pretty bad sense of hearing.

    We are clever. That's all.

    But sorry, we became REALLY clever 200 000 years ago. Before, we were just apes, a bit more different of others. We will not have survive as a species only by being clever. Actually, cleverness kills in nature. One needs to keep some automatism, some mechanisms to protect us.

    So, to come to Quantime explanation, I do think this is a normal animal behaviour and I don't think we need an extra-sensory feeling. I think brain processes sounds, visual perceptions, smells and filter them. In some cases, these sensations are emerging in the conscious part and trigger conscious reaction: "Oh DOUGHNUTS !!!!!!!" (Sorry, I bought season 1-19 of Simpson's). But most time, the brain will process various signals and sometimes, an alarm bell will ring. We call it extra-sensory feeling but it is not.

    A very simple example is the perception of smell of other individual. I have a gift, I can smell when a woman is going to have her period 2-4 days before (I mean even without the PMS...). They smell a mix of thunderstorms, sea and like some pencils with light blue colour, I am serious. It is difficult to describe smells but it is very peculiar. During period, it's completly different smell. Cats recognize women who are pregnant.

    We heard/saw/smell it but we cannot remember how or when. That's all.

    If it is a cat, you will find it totally normal.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    8
    This is funny because I feel like I never know when I'm being watching because I seem to be oblivious to most things around me, unfortunately. But I always watch people, and they seem to always notice!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,416
    Quote Originally Posted by Makandal
    Homo Sapiens has a very low sense of smell, good eyes during the day, poor at night, we are trichromatic which might be an handicap for seeing some patterns in the forest, pretty bad sense of hearing.
    Not really. Our smell is much better than we think it is but most modern humans simply aren't trained in it's use, our eye sight is excellent with both vivid colors and unlimited focal range and superior brain to make sense of it, our hearing compares to many other mammals of our size. Altogether while there are individual mammals that are better in any particular sense, there are others which are worse--we are by no means worse off than most. We also have the most important sense of all, a sense of self and of our emotions which we can chose to go with (RUN!), disregard, or use to pick another action--such as look for the threat or a weapon!

    I agree that cleverness can kill and think our emotional brains which can pick up many of the sensations we tend to filter from our conscious brain can serve us well in a survival situations most of our ancestors lived in from day-to-day.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime
    its probably something to do with a defense mechanism from when in the wild. A sudden alert feeling without having anything set it off, can't say I've noticed animals having that feeling.
    And... uh... how would you know?
    That something was there? Spooky isn't it. 8)

    Wouldn't it be a good idea to determine whether the phenomenon exists at all before you postulate why it does?
    I bounce ideas off to contribute and throw my two cents in, if I created a theory based on physical evidence and observation I could apply for a Doctorate in almost everything I do.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4
    As a hunter, I can tell you it's a genuine phenomenon.

    I usually get it several seconds before a grouse explodes out of a spruce tree, or a rabbit takes off out of a den. It seems to be mainly events that would really draw all your focus (usually fear). I don't know what it is, but I would highly suggest talking to hunters about this, as it's quite common with those that I've talked to.

    It's usually when you are 'zoned out' and just walking, listening to yourself breathe. There's this brief feeling that you're sort of looking at your surroundings from an odd perspective, and then the hair stands up on the back of your neck.

    If I had to place a bet, my money would probably be sitting on some aspect of quantum mechanics. Something about the fundamental nature of reality.... that sort of stuff.

    I suppose if you're going to take anything away from quantum physics, it's that the universe is far stranger than anything we could imagine. Having some sort of lead-in/lead-out to an event, or a slightly perceptible interaction of what were previously independent realities doesn't really seem all that strange when you look at some of the other things out there.

    Sounds nuts, but that's my two bits on the subject... certainly not a leading theory.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by inow View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime
    its probably something to do with a defense mechanism from when in the wild. A sudden alert feeling without having anything set it off, can't say I've noticed animals having that feeling.
    And... uh... how would you know?


    Quote Originally Posted by Quantime
    It must have come about from us being rubbish animals back in the wild, an extra sensory feeling designed to protect us. Either that or paranoia was neccesary for survival... :?
    Wouldn't it be a good idea to determine whether the phenomenon exists at all before you postulate why it does?

    I'd suggest that you try to refrain from being such a pompous fool, inow. The driving force behind the majority of physics is now based purely on WHY something might exist, with the actual confirmation of it's existence coming afterwards (if at all).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by John9876six View Post
    As a hunter, I can tell you it's a genuine phenomenon.
    Fortunately science does not depend upon anecdotes, even when they are from hunters. Everything you have described can be easily explained by conventional phenomena that are well established by observation and experiment. There is no requirement to introduce highly speculative, unfounded hypotheses that lack any operational mechanism. Such speculations might fuel second rate science fiction they have no place in science.

    Quote Originally Posted by John9876six View Post
    Sounds nuts, but that's my two bits on the subject... certainly not a leading theory.
    No, it does not sound nuts, it just sounds as if you are not applying your cirtical thinking skills.

    I'd suggest that you try to refrain from being such a pompous fool, inow.
    That's an interesting approach. Join the forum and in your second post insult a long standing member who has made many informative contributions. You may have misjudged which way the pomposity scales are swinging.
    Last edited by John Galt; January 19th, 2012 at 08:35 AM. Reason: Correct what should have been" Nothing you have described can not be easily explained"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #25  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    17,036
    Quote Originally Posted by John9876six View Post
    I usually get it several seconds before a grouse explodes out of a spruce tree, or a rabbit takes off out of a den.
    Or rather, you think you do.

    Quote Originally Posted by John9876six View Post
    The driving force behind the majority of physics is now based purely on WHY something might exist, with the actual confirmation of it's existence coming afterwards (if at all).
    Er no. The driving force behind physics and other sciences is the observation and measurement of real phenomena and attempts to explain them. Science generally doesn't deal in "why" - partly because it takes you down a rabbit warren of "why questions", partly because it is not something that can be objectively measured. Feynman 'Fun to Imagine' 4: Magnets (and 'Why?' questions...) - YouTube

    So I'm not sure what you were trying to say, but it sounds wrong.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #26  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    Not really. Our smell is much better than we think it is but most modern humans simply aren't trained in it's use, our eye sight is excellent with both vivid colors and unlimited focal range and superior brain to make sense of it, our hearing compares to many other mammals of our size.
    I suspect we city and suburban residents have simply not learned to recognise and use the senses we've got in abundance. And those senses in combination can work wonderfully well but we attribute this to some mysterious quality because we didn't see or hear or feel the signs. What really happens is that our senses work in combination to alert us to something - and there's no way of knowing if or whether it was a visual or auditory or smell sensory stimulus that set this process in action. I'm pretty sure that if we had super high quality cameras recording what happens when people are out hunting, we'd be able to use extra extra slow slo mo (with super sensitive sound analysis for backup) to pick up tiny indications and minuscule signals that animals or birds are present even though the hunters themselves can't identify the 'something' that made them pay particular attention.

    I remember my husband driving very late one night. Side street, not much lighting, approaching a roundabout and the cross street was similarly poorly lit - and the whole area had lots of mature trees making it even darker. He slammed on the brakes. And it was only after the black clad bloke rode his bike very fast, silently, past the front of the car that he had any idea why he'd stopped the car. He couldn't have 'seen' or heard the bike around the corner, through the trees and fences. But clearly there was enough sensory input to impel an emergency response.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #27  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4
    I think your problem is that your thought processes are totally mired in well established conventional phenomena.

    If you can be so arrogant to assume that the current state of science has an adequate explanation for all processes, then I'd suggest you find a way to market your impressive ass-hat to the world. It's a billion dollar industry.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  29. #28  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4
    I'd suggest that you try to refrain from being such a pompous fool, inow.
    That's an interesting approach. Join the forum and in your second post insult a long standing member who has made many informative contributions. You may have misjudged which way the pomposity scales are swinging.[/QUOTE]

    I don't really care if he's a long standing member. He insulted that guy to make himself look like a big shot. He's got issues.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  30. #29  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by John9876six View Post
    I think your problem is that your thought processes are totally mired in well established conventional phenomena.
    In relation to this thread, none of the respondents have any problem. We are not dealing with thought processes, but a methodological process of investigation that has proven itself in a multiplicity of arenas.


    Science embraces supposition, but only when it is rigorously tested.
    Science flourishes on imagination, but imagination in suggesting hypotheses for investigation, not for flights of fancy.
    Science relishes the unconventional, but it does not confuse the radical with the real.

    Your problem - and be assured you have a serious problem - is that you your suppositions are unfounded, your imagination unrestrained by reality, and your love of the unvoncentional is blind.

    You arrogance is to imagine that a fanciful explanation can best a well grounded one. This is the mentality of a child, not of a scientist. You do yourself a disservice with such thinking.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  31. #30  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Quote Originally Posted by John9876six View Post
    If you can be so arrogant to assume that the current state of science has an adequate explanation for all processes, then I'd suggest you find a way to market your impressive ass-hat to the world. It's a billion dollar industry.
    Not sure who you were trying to insult, but it shows in 4 posts, you've already established an ability for high level intellectaul discussion and wit.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  32. #31  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    126
    The question is are you being watched or are you the one watching?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  33. #32  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    The question is are you being watched or are you the one watching?


    Whether you're a hunter looking for prey and wary of snakes, bears or wolves that can harm you or driving, riding, walking on a city street it's always both.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  34. #33  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,847
    It's usually when you are 'zoned out' and just walking, listening to yourself breathe. There's this brief feeling that you're sort of looking at your surroundings from an odd perspective, and then the hair stands up on the back of your neck.

    If I had to place a bet, my money would probably be sitting on some aspect of quantum mechanics. Something about the fundamental nature of reality.... that sort of stuff.
    No need to go that far, to explain the results of an unusual or heightened awareness of one's surroundings.

    What's in front of you - and in your peripheral vision, and in your auditory range, and so forth - is reacting to what's behind you. What's behind you has probably, recently, been in your awareness and left impressions in your current awareness. It's no stretch to think you might pick up on very subtle cues based on long experience and an unusually sensitive state of mind, once in a while.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  35. #34  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    223
    Quote Originally Posted by inow View Post
    The real challenge is that someone merely looking at us doesn't generally cause a sound.
    On the other hand, someone watching us might endeavor not to be heard. Other creatures watching that watcher might hold their chatter upon sighting such sinister behavior. A built-in defense mechanism installed into our DNA long ago might listen for a silence creeping up upon us. A notch in input sounds from behind might set off a silent alarm. Or perhaps it is all of nothing, but as such provokes far less interest.
    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." --Buddha (563BC-483BC)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •