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Thread: experiment kits?

  1. #1 experiment kits? 
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    greetings all first time poster!

    I'm a university graduate from the arts and humanities strand who in the past 6 months has discovered a newfound passion in the development of technologies. Although by no means do i discredit the "arts" it would be nice to be able to better understand the mechanics of the world in which i operate in.

    while I read books and watch lectures to educate myself on basic principles (i do this independent of a classroom environment, I learn for the joy of learning) i thought it would be fun to find some experimental kits that might give me some insight on scientific principles i could conduct to get a better understanding (and did i mention it would be fun :-D )

    Any pointers, or sites you could direct me to take a look at some kits?

    thanks in advance!


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  3. #2  
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    google should be your first choice. if you're interested in biology and have a fair amount of cash, i'd direct you to a DIY biology kit. they usually include everything you need to biologically engineer a microbe. along with a two hour online course (which thanks to google can usually be found for free) you'll have everything you need to make your own species.


    physics: accurate, objective, boring
    chemistry: accurate if physics is accurate, slightly subjective, you can blow stuff up
    biology: accurate if chemistry is accurate, somewhat subjective, fascinating
    religion: accurate if people are always right, highly subjective, bewildering
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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Leszek Luchowski's Avatar
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    Saul, I see no reason for your sarcasm. I wish more people who are into arts and humanities would take even a passing interest in science (and vice versa).

    Illminator, welcome to the amazing and often underappreciated world of science.

    I think we will be able to help you more if you get a bit more specific:

    - which branches of science would you like to experiment with? Chemistry, Newtonian mechanics, optics, electricity, magnetism.... the list does not end here.

    - how advanced are you in your knowledge? Do you remember a lot from the high school science courses? Have you progressed from there?

    - how easy or difficult do you find understanding science?

    - how much time and money are you prepared to spend?

    Cheers, keep us posted, and keep up the good work.
    Leszek. Pronounced [LEH-sheck]. The wondering Slav.
    History teaches us that we don't learn from history.
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  5. #4  
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    i was not being sarcastic whatsoever. those kits actually do exist. forgive me for not clarifying that i wasn't being sarcastic, i hadn't expected people on the science forum to be ignorant of such kits.

    *edit* however i did neglect to mention that the cheap kits are hard to find. finding the needed equipment can run you up to $2000, but with already prepared chemicals i've seen kits at around $150
    physics: accurate, objective, boring
    chemistry: accurate if physics is accurate, slightly subjective, you can blow stuff up
    biology: accurate if chemistry is accurate, somewhat subjective, fascinating
    religion: accurate if people are always right, highly subjective, bewildering
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  6. #5  
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    Not to discredit any other scientific strand but physics is absolutely fascinating. I was first taken aback when I watched Carl Sagans' series on cosmos and although I understand it encapsulated content from many scientific branches, the physics which he used to describe the mechanics of our universe was incredible. electricity would also be an incredibly interesting field to learn more about as well.

    I do have a very limited understanding of science to be honest, most of what I know comes from reading articles and watching documentaries. I have a rudimentary understanding of biology and was terrible in math in high school (I did pass though), and never took calculus for fear of utter failure.

    But looking back.......I truly believe it was because of a lack of interest that I never dedicated as much focus to it in comparison to arts courses. I was an A student, but was never motivated or really understood the importance of pragmatic studies like the math and sciences. However, when I watch documentaries now or read articles I find them much easier to understand than prior.

    I truly believe everything comes down to dedication, to clarify I am 22 years old so I'm a recent university graduate and in terms of time and money, well let me know what there is and I will definitely put money aside to invest in it. I am working full time, but after work do nothing but study and read, and don't spend my money on much since I am living in a secluded area that literally has nothing to do .....so why not be productive?
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  7. #6  
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    It really depends on what area of study you are interested and what level of knowledge you want to reach. You can pick up kits for less than $50 but if you want something advanced you will be looking at paying over $300

    Search on Google and also check-out ebay, you can really find some interesting kits there.
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  8. #7  
    1 Ugly MoFo warthog213's Avatar
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    Radio shack for the Electronics 101 snap-kit. Does many different experiments, and is very easy to use for $39.99. Radioshack.com And then Electronics 101 snap-kit....And also there is the science fair blinking led light kit which cost a mindboggling $14.99. I think th 101 kit makes 101 or more electronic items like transistor radio's metal detector and so fourth. Good luck
    (warthog) an ugly little animal in Africa that is hunted, killed and eaten by lions.

    Sorry i'm no scientist so don't expect me to use those terms which scientist use
    to explain things.... I am only an observer of things....

    Every dream i've dreamed isn't the life I live in....
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  9. #8  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illuminator View Post
    electricity would also be an incredibly interesting field to learn more about
    Snap Circuits looks pretty cool.
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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