Notices
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Water through a canal : circulation way ?

  1. #1 Water through a canal : circulation way ? 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    In am standing in front of Panama canal, and am wondering the following :
    Is Atlantic ocean "higher" than the Pacific ocean, in which case the water should go from Atlantic to Pacific ? Is it the contrary ? Is it even and there is no circulation ? Has the opening provoked any change in water levels? Thanks for any clue on this !


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    The panama canal is not a sea level canal, so water cannot flow from the Atlantic to the Pacific, or vice versa. It is fed by Rio Chagres in the interior.
    http://www.great-adventures.com/dest...iochagres.html


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    Thanks Harold for the prompt answer
    If I get it correctly, the water from the river goes into the canal and go both ways, more or less. It makes sense thanks!
    Are there any sea level canals in the world ? Like Suez maybe ?
    Do you know if my question is relevant, to put it naively "are there higher seas than others"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    Yes, the Suez Canal is at sea level and connects the Mediterranian Sea with the Indian Ocean.

    There are higher seas than others. The Dead Sea is below sea level, but it is isolated from the other seas. There is a net flow into the Mediterranean from the Atlantic, through the Strait of Gibraltar, because the evaporation rate is greater than the rate that fresh water is flowing in from the rivers. This would mean that the Mediterranean must be slightly lower in level than the Atlantic.

    For seas such as the Atlantic and Pacific which are connected over large areas it would be hard to maintain any appreciable level difference, other than that which is caused by tides. The level would simply equalize by flow around the tip of South America for example.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    I had no idea that evaporation was higher than river inflows in the Mediterranean, would have rather guessed the contrary if asked. Good to know ! Thanks for this
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •