Notices
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: English

  1. #1 English 
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    hey, since there are no english forums here, i will ask in the general discussion forum.

    does "compose a schedule" or "composing a schedule" make sense??

    thanks~


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,760
    in what context ?


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    well for example, when you want to plan a schedule. so instead can you say "in composing a schedule" instead of planning a schedule?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Goomalling, Western Australia
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    well for example, when you want to plan a schedule. so instead can you say "in composing a schedule" instead of planning a schedule?
    the distinction between them is so fine as to be negligible -
    as a rule of thumb, though, when communicating with a wide range of people,
    go for the simplest words and terms which say what you mean to say ...
    Nature abhors perfection; cats abhor a vacuum.

    "I don't know; I'm making it up as I go ..." Dr H Jones (Jr).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    i actually try to keep things real simple in terms of literature and english, but this guy in my class last week said that i must say "composing a schedule" whereas i said "planning a schedule."

    that got me annoyed so im just checking with the rest of the world.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,500
    There is a difference in meaning... at least in my mind.


    Planning a schedule implies that you are thinking through the various pieces, you are mentally organizing things, you are exploring conflicts and finding resolutions to them... but, at its core, it is a mental rehearsal function... A process of thought and problem solving.

    Composing a schedule, on the other hand, implies that you are actually putting an already planned schedule on to paper... or into a spreadsheet or something... It suggests that the schedule is being made physical and real... that you are making what you planned tangible.


    That's how I see it, anyway. To plan a schedule is to think through issues and mentally organize the pieces. To compose a schedule is to take those finalized thoughts from the planning stage and put them on to an actual calendar or paper or whatever.


    Since words have multiple meanings and usages, others might legitimately disagree with the above. However, if you want to encompass both concepts (mental planning and translation to paper/schedule), just say "create schedule" and none of this even matters.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Planning a schedule implies that you are thinking through the various pieces, you are mentally organizing things, you are exploring conflicts and finding resolutions to them... but, at its core, it is a mental rehearsal function... A process of thought and problem solving.

    Composing a schedule, on the other hand, implies that you are actually putting an already planned schedule on to paper... or into a spreadsheet or something... It suggests that the schedule is being made physical and real... that you are making what you planned tangible.
    this was the answer i was looking for, thank you
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    Although I would not take that reading of 'compose a schedule'. I see it as a almost an exact equivalent of to plan a schedule, just not as clear, or direct.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,595
    Why not simply "draft" a schedule...or maybe "compose" one. The definition of a synonym, is the word you can spell...
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •