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Thread: Bad lock design

  1. #1 Bad lock design 
    Forum Isotope (In)Sanity's Avatar
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    http://popularmechanics.com/science/...te/index.phtml

    This is a good example of how technolgy appears so perfect yet turns out to be terrible.


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  3. #2  
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    Reminds me of a McDonalds wistle a long, long time ago. Apparantly, it had just the right frequency to make, I believe, payphones believe the user had payed, and thus allowing him to make long-distance calls.

    All I can say to that lock is.. ouch .

    Mr U


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  4. #3  
    JX
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomoUniversalis
    Reminds me of a McDonalds wistle a long, long time ago. Apparantly, it had just the right frequency to make, I believe, payphones believe the user had payed, and thus allowing him to make long-distance calls.

    All I can say to that lock is.. ouch .

    Mr U
    "Hey you, yeah I mean you little girl, step away from the happy meal, and put the whistle down slowly!!"
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  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore spidergoat's Avatar
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    I know someone who can pick locks, and the fact is most locks are horribly insecure. They depend only on slight differences in the height of the pins.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomoUniversalis
    Reminds me of a McDonalds wistle a long, long time ago. Apparantly, it had just the right frequency to make, I believe, payphones believe the user had payed, and thus allowing him to make long-distance calls.
    Oy! Is it possible to be so wrong and never to have been corrected in this matter of utmost urgency?

    It wasn't McDonalds. It was Captain Crunch. And that was the nickname of the man who was one of the original phone Phreakers back in the days of Ma Bell.

    The man is a hero to millions and you'd saddle him with the nickname of "Happy Meal"?

    Ouch.

    John Draper is the name. Phreaking was his game. (I wonder if he took it up the ass in prison?)


    As to the topic. Locks only keep honest people honest.
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  7. #6  
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    Ahhh ... the good old blue box. It is a shame it was fixed before I was old enough to comprehend it's existence. If I am correct, wasn't John Draper blind also?

    A little more info:
    I forget both the holes of the whistle which were covered, and the excact frequency emitted (if you really care that much I'm sure you can google it). Basically, back in the day phones operated by using various frequencies for all of their activities (change inserting produced certain frequencies: google Red Boxing for more info). John Draper figured out that by whistling at a certain frequency he could make free long distance calls. Eventually he was caught ... jail ... Sorry so brief but I'm in a hurry now.
    - sploit -
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  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree invert_nexus's Avatar
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    I'm sure you can google it
    Or you could could follow my links. (They're hard to see, aren't they?)


    Anyway, it wasn't Captain Crunch who was blind, but rather that he was told about the whistle and how it could be modified by a blind friend. And the frequency was 2600 hz. And, yes, it is a damned shame that they fixed it, but then again it's probably for the best or a lot more people would be doing jail time because of it. Knowledge is everywhere these days. Back then it was a bit more exclusive.

    The new protocol used to operate the long distance lines is called ss7 and (in the US at least) isn't even carried on the same wires as the phone signal anymore. In Europe it's still embedded in the main line but not accessible to the subscriber in the way it used to be.

    Since making my post earlier, I've been reading up on Phreaking and the ins and outs of the phone system. Interesting stuff. And complicated.


    Did you know that the first automated switching system was invented by a Kansas City mortician who thought the operators were sending calls intended for his business to his rivals instead?

    Plastic whistles and paranoid morticians. This is the stuff of history.

    (Reminds me of The Secret Life of Machines. Loved that show.)
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by spidergoat
    I know someone who can pick locks, and the fact is most locks are horribly insecure. They depend only on slight differences in the height of the pins.
    Yeah, that is the normal principles of locks...so, that Kryptonite locks can be openend in about 7 seconds. Well, that can be seen as quite secure...I can open a normal lock for bicycles in about 2 seconds, all you need is a screwdriver and a hammer, in fact you just bust the locking mechanism through brute force. So those Kryptonite locks are still somewhat more secure than a normal lock.

    (I am used to opening bicycle locks because I worked in a bicycle shop, not because I tend to steal other people's belongings. )
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  10. #9  
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    I remember seeing the video on how to crack those licks with a bic pen over a year ago...

    I owned one and I soon got rid of it.
    Peace

    Ode to Sci
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