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Thread: Learning Physics

  1. #1 Learning Physics 
    Forum Professor Obviously's Avatar
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    I have a slight interest in physics and would like to understand the maths behind it. In order to do that I would have to learn the math (obviously). I'm not able to choose physics as a subject at school which is part of the reason I made this topic. The reason why I can't choose the subject is because I'm going on the "music-line" (directly translated) and thus there's just no way to fit the subject in to a weekly schedule.

    I would very much appreciate any suggestions on where to start learning physics, be it from the internet or from books. I have no idea where to start.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Hanuka's Avatar
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    Trust me, schoolz are rubbish. Yah better off reading books.

    Just type in google "physics ebook" (for pirated stuff add "megaupload.com" or "rapidshare.com").

    I'd assume that there'll be some good basic/med-lvl stuff there, but for advanced physics
    I'd suggest looking through real bookz... generally ebooks are gr8 for
    niche topics(like dating, tying knots, cheating in games) and all areas of computer
    sciences(haxxz0ring, site design, etc..)


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  4. #3  
    Forum Bachelors Degree Demen Tolden's Avatar
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    A year ago I thought exactly the same thing. I'll list off what I did for you, and let you know what I think about the path I took now.

    A year ago..
    I picked up a book called "Physics DeMystified" by Stan Gibilisco. This book explained physics in a way that assumed the reader might not know very much math. The subjects began with Newtonian mechanics and ended with reletivity. This was a very good book for me at the time, but it in no way was a book that would teach me how to perform my own physics calculations.
    I next borrowed a physics text book from a friend of mine. One glance at the book was enough to convince be there was no way I was going to understand it without learning calculus.
    I next borrowed Early Calculus Transcendentals by James Steward which turned out to be an excellent idea. With this book and the help of our forum members, especially serpico jr, I was able to learn calculus 1 and half of calc 2 before I decided I should get school credit for what I was doing.
    This fall I've started school. The two subjects I am taking are calc 1 which I basically already know I guess, and Calculus Based Physics 1. Based on my experience in this class, I highly recommend that before you learn physics, you get yourself to a calc 2 math level. If you do not do this, you will not fully understand some important physics concepts.

    The best first step to learning physics is to pick up a math text book that will help you get to a high enough math level. If you want my help in learning calc on this forum, I'd be glad to.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Professor Obviously's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hanuka
    Trust me, schoolz are rubbish. Yah better off reading books.

    Just type in google "physics ebook" (for pirated stuff add "megaupload.com" or "rapidshare.com").

    I'd assume that there'll be some good basic/med-lvl stuff there, but for advanced physics
    I'd suggest looking through real bookz... generally ebooks are gr8 for
    niche topics(like dating, tying knots, cheating in games) and all areas of computer
    sciences(haxxz0ring, site design, etc..)
    I've actually already download Physics ebooks which includes: mechanics, Quantum, chemistry, Thermodynamics, problems and formulas. I'm not sure what I can do with it yet though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Demen Tolden
    A year ago I thought exactly the same thing. I'll list off what I did for you, and let you know what I think about the path I took now.

    A year ago..
    I picked up a book called "Physics DeMystified" by Stan Gibilisco. This book explained physics in a way that assumed the reader might not know very much math. The subjects began with Newtonian mechanics and ended with reletivity. This was a very good book for me at the time, but it in no way was a book that would teach me how to perform my own physics calculations.
    I next borrowed a physics text book from a friend of mine. One glance at the book was enough to convince be there was no way I was going to understand it without learning calculus.
    I next borrowed Early Calculus Transcendentals by James Steward which turned out to be an excellent idea. With this book and the help of our forum members, especially serpico jr, I was able to learn calculus 1 and half of calc 2 before I decided I should get school credit for what I was doing.
    This fall I've started school. The two subjects I am taking are calc 1 which I basically already know I guess, and Calculus Based Physics 1. Based on my experience in this class, I highly recommend that before you learn physics, you get yourself to a calc 2 math level. If you do not do this, you will not fully understand some important physics concepts.

    The best first step to learning physics is to pick up a math text book that will help you get to a high enough math level. If you want my help in learning calc on this forum, I'd be glad to.
    "Physics DeMystified" and "Early Calculus Transcendentals". I'll start there then. Thanks a lot. :-D

    I'll be sure to come to the math sub-forum if I encounter any problems. :wink: Don't expect me anytime soon though. I have yet to find the time to do this. I'm also quite lazy. :?
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  6. #5  
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    Maybe this might be useful, maybe it won't.
    http://www.thescienceforum.com/Calcu...ions-8994t.php
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  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    I guess a good starter is:

    Halliday, Resnick, Walker: Fundamentals of Physics

    It's quite expensive though.
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  8. #7  
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    I know how you feel, I have the same problem, cause I dont have physics for 2 years in school and I want to study it... try with books for school... they are not expensive and they have everything for a start, then when you learn everything from them, go on internet and get some other stuff to learn some more... If you are lazy like me, and dont want to "dig" for E-book, go to wikipedia and you will find the most of thing...
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster
    I guess a good starter is:

    Halliday, Resnick, Walker: Fundamentals of Physics

    It's quite expensive though.
    Expensive? Hmm... I googled it and found many editions. This site might be useful, yes?

    http://bcs.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?ac...newwindow=true

    I think I found an ebook though:

    http://www.mininova.org/tor/1309902

    Is this it?

    EDIT:

    As far as I understood from Demen Tolden, I would have to learn calculus first right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mascha
    I know how you feel, I have the same problem, cause I dont have physics for 2 years in school and I want to study it... try with books for school... they are not expensive and they have everything for a start, then when you learn everything from them, go on internet and get some other stuff to learn some more... If you are lazy like me, and dont want to "dig" for E-book, go to wikipedia and you will find the most of thing...
    I don't think Wikipedia is good enough for learning though. So I'm aiming at buying books.

    I hope I have time for this stuff though. Perhaps I could take an hour each day? I think I could sacrifice some time off watching series to learning physics.
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  10. #9  
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    ...I sacrifice my social life... I had to choose between watching series and going out... I chose series and physics :S

    well... I dont have money to buy every book that interest me... so I try to find it on wiki or google and than discuss it with my uncle who finished theoretic physics...

    Its so complicated when you learn on your own..

    you got interesting lectures on youtube... I will post you some url's these days...
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dishmaster
    I guess a good starter is:

    Halliday, Resnick, Walker: Fundamentals of Physics

    It's quite expensive though.
    I have that!

    Also:

    Physics - Kane and Sternheim

    Calculus - Howard Anton

    Statics - William F Riley and Leroy D Sturges

    Not sure how they compare though.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obviously
    Expensive? Hmm... I googled it and found many editions. This site might be useful, yes?

    http://bcs.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?ac...newwindow=true

    I think I found an ebook though:

    http://www.mininova.org/tor/1309902

    Is this it?
    It looks like the first link is an on-line add-on to the book. From the info I read there, the second link probably points to an e-book version of the printed issue, but I don't want to support illegal downloads.
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  13. #12  
    Forum Professor Obviously's Avatar
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    So I've gotten a book on calculus, but now I notice that I should refresh my knowledge on more advanced 'Algebra' (more specifically I need to learn how to use square root). I also need to learn 'Analytic Geometry' (which I really don't remember ever learning). Refreshing my memory on 'Functions' wouldn't be too bad either.

    Also, in school I chose practical math instead of theoretical math. Obviously I made the wrong choice and I didn't learn Trigonometry. So that needs to be in order as well.

    Ugh... Does anyone have any books to recommend? :P
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  14. #13 Re: Learning Physics 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obviously
    I have a slight interest in physics and would like to understand the maths behind it. In order to do that I would have to learn the math (obviously). I'm not able to choose physics as a subject at school which is part of the reason I made this topic. The reason why I can't choose the subject is because I'm going on the "music-line" (directly translated) and thus there's just no way to fit the subject in to a weekly schedule.

    I would very much appreciate any suggestions on where to start learning physics, be it from the internet or from books. I have no idea where to start.
    ive got the same slight interest in physics mainly because my friend talks to me about physics everyday near enough.... and most of it is interesting and im seriously kicking myself for NOT choosing as a subject at school..... because he makes it sound so interesting!!!! and most of it makes sense..... its just the maths that put me off physics and because i was failing maths (BADLY!!!!! ) and so i chose business studies instead.... bad choice... but nothing else tickled my fancy...
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  15. #14  
    sox
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    Hmm a good start physics textbook is University Physics by Harris Benson.

    As for maths... To get you started you probably only need calculus and trigonometry. Linear Algebra is probably beyond what you need to know right now.

    I would reccomend a basic highschool textbook. Once you've learned the calculus the physics should become clearer.

    If you want a giggle, look into some really nasty advanced textbooks. Might be an incentive to work hard.

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  16. #15  
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    Can I ask, are you wanting to go on to study physics at a proper university level? If so continue what you're doing and try and get into some kind of course.

    But if not, why not just read popular science books? Brian Green's books are quite accessible and there are plenty more besides.

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  17. #16  
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    I'm terrible at anything higher than Algebra but I need to take a few Physics courses to get my Bio degree..will I still be able to get good grades?
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  18. #17  
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    Hi,

    I think the best method to learn physics by your own is to read general physics books, if there you see some maths that you don't understand you can find help on internet. You don't need to know all the maths to follow this kind of books. Go slowly , understand the concepts and stop every time you need more math and check them on internet.

    Which book?
    My advice is to study/read by your own the Feyman books about general physics. There you can find "all" the physics in general terms, also at the end of the book you can find an appendix with some math you need.

    You don't need to buy it, you can find the book on the internet. When you find it you can check if it is what you want and then you can buy the printed book.

    Good luck! :wink:

    PS: I didn't read all the replies then I don't know if someone else said the same thing.
    PS2: Sorry for my English, I'm learning!
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  19. #18 Smart learning 
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    We have developed an android application just for users like you. The application is free of cost and provides practice papers as well as learning material for physics.
    You can download it from the following link

    https : // play.google.com/store/apps/ details?id=technologies.com.angular.jeephysics

    Since the app is currently under development we would greatly appreciate your review and suggestions.
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  20. #19  
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    Just came across this: The Theoretical Minimum

    Also available as a book: http://www.amazon.com/The-Theoretica.../dp/046502811X
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  21. #20  
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    This looks pretty good Strange. I took a look at one of the first lectures and actually understood it. Perhaps I'm getting smarter.
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