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View Poll Results: Will this whole mining operation work?

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  • Yes

    3 75.00%
  • No

    1 25.00%
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Thread: He3

  1. #1 He3 
    Forum Sophomore Skiyk's Avatar
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    Scientists have found the isotope, He3 on the moon in abundance. This isotope has 2 protons and 1 neutron which is uncommon here on Earth. They are hoping to use this in nuclear fusion as our 2nd-generation power source. I think the mining begins in the year 2020. Yes...mining on the moon.


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  3. #2  
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    Wow! Fusion must be an extremely powerful source of energy indeed if it even makes it economically viable to send spaceships to the Moon and back just to get the principal raw material.


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  4. #3  
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    I don't want them to mine the moon

    They gonna ruin that next?
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  5. #4 Re: He3 
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skiyk
    I think the mining begins in the year 2020.
    I think you are mistaken.
    We may return to the moon by 2020. That return may lead, eventually to helium isotope mining. It is not an initial goal.

    Moreover, it would probably make sense to have the technology to use the helium before we spent money mining it. We are still twenty years away from a practical working fusion reactor. It is interesting to note that we have been twenty years away for each of the last thirty years. 8)
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  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore Skiyk's Avatar
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    The date was what I was not sure of. Anyways, there are trying to get it as soon as possible. In my opinion, it think it is a great idea as long as the mining does not alter the moon's orbit.
    A biophysicist talks physics to the biologists and biology to the physicists, but then he meets another biophysicist, they just discuss women.
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  7. #6  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    At the risk of repetition 'they' are not trying to get it as soon as possible. All that has happened is that various parties have expressed an interest in the possibility. There is no project to mine helium. There is no budget to mine helium. There are no substantive plans to mine helium. All there is, is a rough outline of a sketch of a concept.

    The helium is in the surface layers of the moon, in the regolith. The amount that would be removed would have no detectable effect on the lunar orbit.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Sophomore Skiyk's Avatar
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    I meant the process of mining would alter it and some parties have expressed view that they want to get there very soon. I'm not just talking about America or wherever you are from. Other nations do plan to get there immediately preceeding building a large scale nuclear fusion reactor.
    A biophysicist talks physics to the biologists and biology to the physicists, but then he meets another biophysicist, they just discuss women.
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  9. #8  
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    Helium-3 (He-3) is chemical which is a light, non-radioactive isotope of helium with two protons and one neutron, rare on Earth, sought for use in nuclear fusion research.
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  10. #9  
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    I think yes , but only on the basis that the oil companies etc don't stop it .
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