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Thread: UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change : We could be in for some very big problems (or are there already).

  1. #1 UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change : We could be in for some very big problems (or are there already). 
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    BBC News is reporting* the latest findings from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and it is not a pretty picture, as most already know just by watching the news.

    Many others don't need to watch any news as they are directly impacted by fires, floods, and droughts, etc. But the IPCC reports that if we act quickly, we may be able to reverse this trend.

    While we have been talking about doing something about all this, these recent major events indicate we need to stop talking and start doing something big time, right now.

    What are the chances we can turn this around? Presently, they appear to be slim-to-none.

    Stay tuned, if you can.


    "Climate change: IPCC report is 'code red for humanity'"

    * https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-58130705


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    Wildfires in Siberia are bigger than all the others in the world combined. They are releasing vast quantities of carbon, and adding to global warming in a horrific feedback. Smoke from these fires has reached the north pole for the first time*.

    Predictions indicate that the fires around the world will increase in the future. It seems the only thing that will stop them is when they run out of fuel.

    It would appear that Mother Nature is not amused with humans and their activities.

    What other paybacks are in store for us?! Time will tell.



    "Smoke from Siberia wildfires reaches north pole in historic first"

    * https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...historic-first


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    ox
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    Temp of 48C in Sicily is believed to be Europe's highest.
    Wild fires in Algeria have taken a death toll.

    How much do you trust politicians and theologians as custodians of this planet with climate change?
    0/10 for me.

    How much do you trust politicians?
    0.1/10, but I think I'm over optimistic.

    How much do you trust theologians?
    As these people are downright dangerous, I won't even give them 0/10.

    How much do you trust scientists?
    Not sure about this, because they also have their own agendas.
    I'll say 6/10.

    Greta?
    9/10.
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    According to Fred Pearce in his new book A Trillion Trees, that's how many more we need right now.
    At the dawn of "civilisation" our planet had 6 trillion, and we've felled half of those.
    If my maths are correct we've lost 3 trillion trees in under 10,000 years.
    But of course, trees are a damn nuisance as they stand in the way of our "progress".
    Pearce thinks we should go for re-wilding, and not plant any.

    With time running out is there enough time?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    According to Fred Pearce in his new book A Trillion Trees, that's how many more we need right now.
    At the dawn of "civilisation" our planet had 6 trillion, and we've felled half of those.
    If my maths are correct we've lost 3 trillion trees in under 10,000 years.
    But of course, trees are a damn nuisance as they stand in the way of our "progress".
    Pearce thinks we should go for re-wilding, and not plant any.

    With time running out is there enough time?
    How many trillion more will burn in the coming years?

    And where do we get the rain for the new trees to grow? Lack of rain due to climate change is the main problem.

    The burned out areas are perfect for growing them with all the open space, and likely many nutrients from the ashes. But that rain problem......

    Water is the key to putting out all these fires, and growing more trees. So much water on the planet, but so little for the trees!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    The Great Green Wall certainly is ambitious, and may help a lot of people. It also helps that these projects are in areas which receive sufficient rain. From the website, they claim to have replanted almost 24 million trees.

    But tree losses due to recent global fires are in the billions. Estimated losses for last year's fires in Siberia alone are in the billions. That is several orders of magnitude greater than those trees planted in Africa. It would seem an unlikely solution to the global fires.

    Still, The Great Green Wall looks good for those living in Africa. They can use a break. But for all those burning dry places, what are we going to do?

    Sadly most of the world's leaders are playing Nero's fiddle - and it sounds rather out of tune.....

    Perhaps these catastrophic events result from the "fire and brimstone" which has threatened us all for so many centuries. (Or not).
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    2006 - Al Gore, An Inconvenient Truth.

    2006 - James Lovelock, Revenge of Gaia.

    1859 - Charles Darwin, Origin of Species.

    There's a bit of a gap there where people forgot about how life works on this planet.
    If you believe Lovelock it's not only organisms that evolve. the whole planet is evolving.

    How about science as the culprit?
    With engineering technology it has shown us how to fell a tree in seconds.
    It has produced vaccines to fight viruses, but they are there for a purpose - to help stabilise the Earth's ecosystem.
    Cancers are also there for a purpose, to keep populations under control, but we are winning the battle against them.
    TB was a big killer until a drug came along...

    In the last 80 years the world's population has doubled, and let's not forget it was fairly stable for long periods.

    COP 26, don't make me laugh.
    Popularist politicians and egg headed scientists with their own agendas will be there but where are the people?
    Delegates will just make pledges, junket, then fly home.
    Extinction Rebellion will be outside with banners about net zero by 2025, but it won't happen.
    Even Australia won't commit to 2050.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ox View Post
    In the last 80 years the world's population has doubled, and let's not forget it was fairly stable for long periods.

    Actually the world population has roughly tripled from 1950 (ca. 2.5 billion) to the current level of ca. 7.6 billion. (But what is a few extra billion +/- ?!)

    This growth of the human scourge on the planet is clearly the most significant driver of climate change, pollution, over-fishing, etc., etc., etc.

    And yes, science and technology has brought most of these problems to us with medicines, vaccines, increased food production and nutrition, along with air and water pollution, etc., allowing for such a human abundance.

    Many religions also share in the blame for their collective mandate : "And you, be ye fruitful, and multiply; Bring forth abundantly in the earth, and multiply therein". (And we did, we did!)

    Now we are suffering payback time, it appears. We are our own (and the world's) worst enemy, and it seems very unlikely enough of us will make peace with ourselves and the world.

    Solutions to all the world's problems appear beyond our reach. But looking at a bleak future, there remains in some of us hope that advances can be made to mitigate the disasters.

    Without hope, we are surely lost.

    Those who are religious have plenty of hope. "Life ever after." Perhaps we should envy them, even if we cannot join them in their delusions.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Helix View Post
    Actually the world population has roughly tripled from 1950 (ca. 2.5 billion) to the current level of ca. 7.6 billion. (But what is a few extra billion +/- ?!)
    Hmm..that's worse than I thought. I was born in 1950 and I'd been led believe it was half then compared to today.
    No wonder I remember cycling in the countryside and seeing little traffic even on main roads in Warwickshire. The verges were alive with wild flowers, the trees were in blossom. Then came the age of the car and pesticides, and most beautiful nature almost gone.
    Going back a few hundred years and this area was nearly all forest. I imagine that a man could wander into it and get lost, but markings on trees would point to the desired path.
    The Forest of Arden is just left with a a few small areas of trees. There is some replanting, but too late. I have also witnessed beautiful woodland ripped out for a motorway.

    This growth of the human scourge on the planet is clearly the most significant driver of climate change, pollution, over-fishing, etc., etc., etc.
    Human infestation of the planet without control is not Darwinian. Wars do appear to be a way to control population, so diplomacy also adds to climate change.
    When George Price realised war had to be because of genetics, he took his own life.

    And yes, science and technology has brought most of these problems to us with medicines, vaccines, increased food production and nutrition, along with air and water pollution, etc., allowing for such a human abundance.
    Many religions also share in the blame for their collective mandate : "And you, be ye fruitful, and multiply; Bring forth abundantly in the earth, and multiply therein". (And we did, we did!)
    The Holy Bible, the most destructive book of selected texts ever, based on a god who drowned every man, woman and child except for one family. What does that tell you about the gullibility of humans?

    There is a price to be paid for everything which steps out of line with nature.
    We are like chain smokers who too late realise their folly.

    July 2021 - the hottest month ever recorded on Earth.

    PS. I realise now that Richard Dawkins's drum banging for the wonders of science is wrong, because science more than anything has contributed to the climate crisis.
    Who are most likely to suffer? The little people of course.
    Last edited by ox; August 15th, 2021 at 07:54 AM.
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