Notices
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: 2017 - A Year of Noticeably Dramatic Weather in Canada and elsewhere.

  1. #1 2017 - A Year of Noticeably Dramatic Weather in Canada and elsewhere. 
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,055
    The weather in much of Canada has been rather extreme to put matters mildly. Central B.C. is experiencing the worst fire season in six decades and there have been numerous emergency evacuations. Fire- fighters from across the nation have been deployed to assist.

    Fuel to the fire

    The story of how things got like this is a slow-speed disaster of climate change, a beetle invasion, and the unintended consequences of well-meaning policy gone wrong.
    https://www.newscientist.com/article...ire-emergency/


    Thus far, Yukon has been spared much fire activity though the recent 10 days of 25-29C weather has the forest tinder dry. Cooler weather is returning and hopefully a bit of rain.

    There will be ripple effects from the fire devastation, including lost tourism and other employment revenue as well as affected agriculture and livestock numbers which will result in higher prices for certain foods.

    I invite others to share what effects the regional, national and global weather may be having in their part of the world.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Senior pineapples's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ireland someplace
    Posts
    359
    Not much to report in Ireland. Weather fairly mundane standard 18C. When it rains, it doesn’t pour much. When’s it’s sunny, it’s just warm enough not to wear your jacket. Our tornedoes will knock over a chair at best and our earthquakes are so rare and mild you’d be forgiven for thinking it was your stomach.

    Apparently though there’s a serious heatwave hitting parts of Europe dubbed ‘Heatwave Lucifer’. And we’re not getting it


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Samurai of Logic Falconer360's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in Washington
    Posts
    378
    Spokane Washington has just broken a record from 1894 of 15 days in a row over 90 degrees. Meanwhile Seattle just broke it's record for most consecutive days without rain, 52 consecutive days. The record was set at 51 back in 1951. And both streaks are still going.
    "For every moment of triumph, for every instance of beauty, many souls must be trampled." Hunter S Thompson

    "It is easy to kill someone with a slash of a sword. It is hard to be impossible for others to cut down"
    - Yagyu Munenori

    "Only a warrior chooses pacifism; others are condemned to it."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,055
    One point of interest is that even in this age of connectivity and near instant news available through multiple media, including the device that many have on their person most of the day, some folks just do not seem capable of connecting the dots.

    "Why are there no fresh cherries on the shelf?"

    Firstly, most of our cherries come from B.C. and much of that province and transportation network has been affected by the fire situation of many weeks duration.

    Secondly, did you read the multiple notices around the store that the highway has been closed for 24 hours because of a tanker spill on the Alaska Highway? Our fresh produce arrives daily and when cherries are on sale for $2.98/lb, they are sold out at the end of each day. Cherries are perishable and space is limited. We have no space to warehouse extra product and this town no longer even has a fresh warehouse which means that when the trucks are not able to get through, the choicest fresh goods will be out of stock within 24 hours.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post

    I invite others to share what effects the regional, national and global weather may be having in their part of the world.
    North central US

    Spring was cloudy, wet, and cool, slowing green-up leaf out significantly. But it was consistent enough that we did not get significant frost damage to native plants. Not so much for the gardeners trying to get their produce going. Stunted plants early, plus significant root damage from the too wet conditions and slowed field planting. My wild blackberries were 7-10 later than usual. Impacts on wildlife as nest failure was moderate to high for the early nesting birds, however, many produced a second batch, which just means less mature birds for migration (anecdotal). Still within the low end of 'normal'.

    Frog/toad numbers seem to be down, usually my yard is a moving mass of babies headed out from nearby waters. Butterfly and bee numbers were down early but OK now. Ladybug numbers were low but seem to be rebounding, typically I do not have an aphid problem but this year I did (resolved now with the ladybug rebound). Many of these insects seem to be a bit on the smaller side and I attribute that to the cold wet spring. Anecdotal again.

    Became a bit dry in June/july with some heat moving in, but again, within parameters.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,309
    I agree with the OP. It seems to be human nation to remember and begin to accept longer trends only when there's some type of extreme--regardless of whether that one extreme really represents "evidence" in its own right (it usually doesn't). I'm in Western Washington States Olympic Peninsula and recorded 0.03 inches of rain over the past 2 months, only broken by last nights welcome light rain. Owners, including myself, lost many new trees; we've had smoke for weeks from BC fires all adding up to a memorable summer. And for the first time I've actually heard discussions about climate change in market lines. For a lot of people--this might well be the year, they opened their minds.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    4,055
    Another phenomenon of note this year is that the balsam poplar trees are shiny with a sticky liquid, to the point that it is dripping off and puddling on driveways, creating a gluey mess.

    At first the popular opinion was that it was from the tree itself in response to the wildly vacillating weather we have been experiencing. My mother took it upon herself to contact our local forestry extension services
    and learned that this sticky liquid was from aphids which are an absolute plague in town this year and have taken a fancy to the poplars. Out in the countryside where I reside, we have the usual run of leaf miners
    which leave their silver tell tale trails on many of the leaves but do not seem to harm the tree significantly.

    To date, I have not found a single aphid in my veggie garden and for that, I am very happy. Once the little nasties get into my lettuce, I find them very off-putting and then the horses get the rest of the lettuce but so far, so good.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    1,970
    Our summer (San Diego) was very warm until a few weeks ago, when we started getting June gloom almost every day (low clouds in the morning from off the ocean.) It's very unusual this time of year, and it reduces temperatures a little since it doesn't burn off until 11am or so.

    Side note - Greenland has been so hot and dry that there is a 1000+ acre wildfire burning there right now. That's never happened before, and scientists aren't even sure what's burning and how large it will get. Strange days indeed.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,782
    Quote Originally Posted by billvon View Post
    Our summer (San Diego) was very warm until a few weeks ago, when we started getting June gloom almost every day (low clouds in the morning from off the ocean.) It's very unusual this time of year, and it reduces temperatures a little since it doesn't burn off until 11am or so.

    Side note - Greenland has been so hot and dry that there is a 1000+ acre wildfire burning there right now. That's never happened before, and scientists aren't even sure what's burning and how large it will get. Strange days indeed.
    Got a link for where they wonder what is actually burning?
    Is it not the underground peat quite often?

    I found this but it doesn't seem to address that question.

    https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/g...-icy-greenland
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    1,970
    Quote Originally Posted by geordief View Post
    Got a link for where they wonder what is actually burning?
    Is it not the underground peat quite often?
    I found this but it doesn't seem to address that question.
    They think it's peat, but aren't sure, because there's a lot of new vegetation growing there due to the warmer climate.

    From MJ Weather Desk:

    Though west Greenland, where the fire is burning, is a semi-arid region, rainfall and temperatures there have been increasing, helping to foster more dense vegetation. Box says this is part of the “shrubification” of the entire Arctic as temperatures warm and the growing season lengthens. Denser vegetation is making large fires more likely, in combination with the simultaneous tendency for longer and more intense droughts and the rise in thunderstorm likelihood due to erratic weather patterns.
    . . .
    Mottram says that if the fire is burning in peatland, it could rage for weeks.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    1,970
    duplicate
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. multi-year ice and weather
    By sculptor in forum Environmental Issues
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 26th, 2014, 11:35 PM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: July 29th, 2013, 09:30 PM
  3. Dramatic sea level rises from the past
    By Lynx_Fox in forum Earth Sciences
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: August 10th, 2009, 01:59 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •