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Thread: Our Ocean What is there to study?

  1. #1 Our Ocean What is there to study? 
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    Ive been doing some person researching into regions of unexplored ocean. I would like some help identifying some researching activities that could be performed out at sea. My idea would be use cameras to monitor fish populations. However, I'm sure there many other options out there and i need some help identifying some.

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated.


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    Where to start!! Contact some Oceanography academic people. I will tell you one thing...friend of mine and his dad sailed from LA to Hilo side......said there is more freaking garbage in the ocean than you can shake a stick at....maybe your focus should be cleaning it up for the fish!


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    Most cities that are located on the ocean front use the ocean for sewage waste disposal with outfalls that dump "treated "sewage into the oceans. That creates many problems including outbursts of fecal contamination which kills fish and sickens people who swim in that place. That would be a good place to study to find better ways to stop polluting the oceans in that manner. Of course there are many other ways so just keep looking around like:

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...54176721,d.eWU

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...54176721,d.eWU
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    My idea would be use cameras to monitor fish populations.
    A lot of this stuff is nowadays done by a combination of satellite imaging and by semi-static recording on known migration routes as well as monitoring by fishing fleets and their scouting vessels.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    there is a lot of monitoring being done off shore....but not deep sea
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    What research could be done in the deep sea then? Observation of ocean floor? Wildlife?
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    Nothing much can be done in the deep sea. Oceanographers have in recent years become a bit more safety conscious so they don't do some of the extraordinary dangerous things on the surface that they used to have to do. Deep ocean stuff requires laaarge funding for super duper expensive equipment and, sometimes, specialist divers and they're not free either.

    Most of this work is done by reasonably sized research teams, not by individuals working alone.

    If I were you I'd do a job search for marine research or fisheries research. Not to find your ideal project, but to get an idea of the sorts of things that do get researched and what is involved in various kinds of research activities.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Quote Originally Posted by morosj View Post
    What research could be done in the deep sea then? Observation of ocean floor? Wildlife?
    How about clean up ...and how waste is dumped there...with film it's horrible...every sailor who has made the 3 week sail....says they can't believe the crap
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  10. #9  
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    how to build an island in deep sea.

    building school and roads for fish

    helping to build UNO type organiation of all marine organisms to sort their issues themselves

    good luck
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  11. #10  
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    personally;
    I'd like to see more continental shelf archeology
    down to 180 meters
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    You could study the behavior of certain type of fishes in different weather patterns. Or you could study the relationship from one group of fish to another.
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    Reading this, I am now very eager to continue researching.

    If I was to design a research vessel with access to any resource, what else would you study?

    Are there any other things? Waste seems to be an issue so ill look into that
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    Set up slow release points of CO2 near the sea bed and conduct inventories of life, CO2 concentration and acidity.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    personally;
    I'd like to see more continental shelf archeology
    down to 180 meters
    great Idea!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stargate View Post
    You could study the behavior of certain type of fishes in different weather patterns. Or you could study the relationship from one group of fish to another.
    Fish "Run" certain times of the years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Set up slow release points of CO2 near the sea bed and conduct inventories of life, CO2 concentration and acidity.
    Can you explain a little more? Si vous plait!
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Set up slow release points of CO2 near the sea bed and conduct inventories of life, CO2 concentration and acidity.
    Can you explain a little more? Si vous plait!
    Our oceans are becoming increasingly acidic in response to increasing atmosphere CO2 because dissolved CO2 turns into carbonic acid in water. There's a lot of lab work showing a wide range of effects on marine life, shell fish that can't reproduce and behavior changes in fish. There isn't much field experimentation though which is where I'm going with slowly releasing CO2 and measuring the effects on the ecology nearby. Shell fish species are already going local extinction along the Washington State coast--the native oyster beds that used to cover the bays are already disappearing unable to reproduce and commercial oyster having to import larva. It might well be the most devastating impact of burning fossil fuels but we just don't know yet.

    Since Hawaii is the de facto standard for measuring atmosphere CO2, scientist are also measuring dropping ocean pH there. Red is CO2, light blue is pH.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Set up slow release points of CO2 near the sea bed and conduct inventories of life, CO2 concentration and acidity.
    Can you explain a little more? Si vous plait!
    Our oceans are becoming increasingly acidic in response to increasing atmosphere CO2 because dissolved CO2 turns into carbonic acid in water. There's a lot of lab work showing a wide range of effects on marine life, shell fish that can't reproduce and behavior changes in fish. There isn't much field experimentation though which is where I'm going with slowly releasing CO2 and measuring the effects on the ecology nearby. Shell fish species are already going local extinction along the Washington State coast--the native oyster beds that used to cover the bays are already disappearing unable to reproduce and commercial oyster having to import larva. It might well be the most devastating impact of burning fossil fuels but we just don't know yet.

    Since Hawaii is the de facto standard for measuring atmosphere CO2, scientist are also measuring dropping ocean pH there. Red is CO2, light blue is pH.
    Mahalo!
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  20. #19  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Set up slow release points of CO2 near the sea bed and conduct inventories of life, CO2 concentration and acidity.
    Can you explain a little more? Si vous plait!
    Our oceans are becoming increasingly acidic in response to increasing atmosphere CO2 because dissolved CO2 turns into carbonic acid in water. There's a lot of lab work showing a wide range of effects on marine life, shell fish that can't reproduce and behavior changes in fish. There isn't much field experimentation though which is where I'm going with slowly releasing CO2 and measuring the effects on the ecology nearby. Shell fish species are already going local extinction along the Washington State coast--the native oyster beds that used to cover the bays are already disappearing unable to reproduce and commercial oyster having to import larva. It might well be the most devastating impact of burning fossil fuels but we just don't know yet.

    Since Hawaii is the de facto standard for measuring atmosphere CO2, scientist are also measuring dropping ocean pH there. Red is CO2, light blue is pH.
    Could the gasses released by the volcano's have anything to do with that? It is always in action!
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    There are also places around the world where nature is conducting these experiments for us. Locating more of them and seeing the differing effects on the various ecologies in those places is a good project.

    "We conducted a study in Papua New Guinea, where subsurface volcanic activity has caused naturally-occurring CO2 to continuously bubble up from the seabed. These "CO2 seeps" have created localised changes to seawater acidity similar to those expected throughout the world's oceans by the end of this century if CO2 emissions continue unabated.
    "These seeps provide important clues to what the marine world might look like in the future,"

    Early victims of ocean acidification could go extinct this century - Latest News - AIMS
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Could the gasses released by the volcano's have anything to do with that? It is always in action!
    Only if their activity was changing significantly. If they're just pottering along doing what they always do, they can't force the kind of rapid change we're seeing. (And anyway, our emissions are massively more than even the worst volcanic eruptions.)
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  23. #22  
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    hmm this looks interesting ill look into this aswel! these suggestions are great
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Could the gasses released by the volcano's have anything to do with that? It is always in action!
    Only if their activity was changing significantly. If they're just pottering along doing what they always do, they can't force the kind of rapid change we're seeing. (And anyway, our emissions are massively more than even the worst volcanic eruptions.)
    They aren't quite piddling along. They are spewing stuff in the air!!! UGH!! HVO Photos & Video
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    Doesn't matter what they do. They're not in the same league as us.


    From here. Do volcanoes emit more CO2 than humans?
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  26. #25  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Doesn't matter what they do. They're not in the same league as us.


    From here. Do volcanoes emit more CO2 than humans?
    THey have a vent of their own.
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  27. #26  
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    why earth does not have exhaut fan for CO2?
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    why earth does not have exhaut fan for CO2?
    1. It's never needed one until now. The biological and geological systems for cycling and recycling CO2 and other gases managed to remain in reasonable balance until we completely mucked up the geological cycle. Releasing 3 million years worth of sequestered carbon each and every year is a major disruption to the geological cycling of CO2 through rocks.

    2. Because the whole planetary and atmospheric system is more or less self-contained. (If CO2 could escape, so could oxygen - not such a good idea for oxygen dependent life forms.) Otherwise there'd be no atmospheric gases left after 3 and a half billion years, or a lot less than there is now. The other gas planets in our solar system would be steadily decreasing in size also if that was the way it worked.

    Pick No 1 or No 2 or both.
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  29. #28  
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    THey have a vent of their own.
    And they emit just 65-319 million tonnes of CO2 through those vents.

    Or are you asking another question.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  30. #29  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    THey have a vent of their own.
    And they emit just 65-319 million tonnes of CO2 through those vents.

    Or are you asking another question.
    It was a play on words.
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    OK. I missed that.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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    Guys this is great! If i was to design something to moniter CO2 and PH levels in the sea what else could i include with this?
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    First find out how it's being monitored already. This is a big, huge area well covered by several major research organisations.

    Unfortunately the biggest ocean monitoring system, the Argo floats, doesn't monitor pH, but there are a couple of large scale monitoring projects as well as dozens looking at acidification in various environments. All the way from tropical reefs to the Antarctic.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  34. #33  
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    morosj, I am pleased you are finding useful suggestions. May I ask what this is for? It sounds a lot like a homework project. Just curious.
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    As much as I might like to think, unfortunately, my school isn't that creative. Our school is wanting to build a new school science building, which is great, however, without anything to research or to do apart from teach in this new building, there really inst much point in building one.
    I am researching into a few issues and writing up a few proposals to my school, of which I hope they gather some interest and hopefully support me in developing some solutions. As I am in Australia, we don't really have any scientific research of our own, nor a global perspective of the problems out there. This is why I am asking for problems related to the sea, as Australia is surrounded by water.
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    And i must add, thankyou for sharing some of the global problems out there related to the sea!
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    As I am in Australia, we don't really have any scientific research of our own, nor a global perspective of the problems out there. This is why I am asking for problems related to the sea, as Australia is surrounded by water.
    Well, we do have the Bureau of Meteorology. And every state and territory except the ACT have a Fisheries Dept in one form or another.

    And we do have the University of Queensland's Centre for Marine Science Centre for Marine Science - The University of Queensland, Australia

    The Centre for Marine Science comprises one of the largest and diverse group of marine
    scientists and engineers in Australia, with over 50 independent research group leaders, 50
    postdoctoral researchers and 200 PhD students.
    The University of Tasmania has the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies. About IMAS - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies - University of Tasmania, Australia

    IMAS brings together 200 staff and 140 graduate students from:
    • The Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute (TAFI)
    • The Institute for Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies (IASOS), and
    • Some marine and Antarctic scientists from the academic Schools of UTAS

    Then there's Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg's Marine Science group at the Global Change Institute.

    Pretty well every major university has some projects or even whole institutes devoted to the ocean in one way or another.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    However, any deep sea marine exploration isn't really being covered, just a number of research stations set up, mainy around Antarctica and great barrier reef. In open ocean, im sure there is more to be done. Thats why im really looking into this.
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  39. #38  
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    Well, the current research vessel, Southern Surveyor, is being replaced by a bigger, better, fancier ship which can carry twice as many people and stay at sea for most of the year. Meaning a lot more buoys and other monitoring devices can be deployed and retrieved once it gets going.

    Catalyst: Southern Surveyor - ABC TV Science
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    thats great, ive got alot to look into now
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