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Thread: Rewilding

  1. #1 Rewilding 
    Forum Masters Degree LuciDreaming's Avatar
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    A good case for reintroducing wild species and a bit more support for the Gaia hypothesis.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/george_monb...the_world.html


    "And we should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once. And we should call every truth false which was not accompanied by at least one laugh" Nietzsche.
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  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    Just hope they have enough room to survive and that humans are not going to be able to kill them off.


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  4. #3  
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    Not too found of the Gaia hypothesis because it's been taken up by too many extreme environmentalist who put emotion over reason; when it's just a useful metaphor to think about ecology, like "selfish genes" and others.

    The examples though are extraordinary though and excellent examples of just how complex things can be. Never heard of fecal plumes before...which got me thinking about how much fecal mater there probably is out of a 100 ton mammal. (eek!)

    The changing Yellowstone river reminded me of several rivers in the Pacific Northwest which had documented river bottom changes between the early 20th century when their watershed was mostly virgin wilderness and now where it's almost entirely 2nd and 3rd cut forest. Could those also recover to a less flood vulnerable states if given a chance?
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    yes
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Much of the Yukon remains as undeveloped and our population, by today's standards, remains sparse. Many people like to come here to vacation and visit to enjoy this closer experience of nature, to the effect that some of the venues have placed limits on the numbers of persons that can travel through, the Chilkoot Trail being one, and people have to book an appointment in advance.

    The resident long term population has and continues to oppose rapid development of our resources, holding all agencies up to close public scrutiny when proposals come forward for we seek to safeguard these treasures for the generations to come. Our wildlife populations are also an important source of wild harvest for many living in the rural communities and our regulations reflect the interests of a sustainable harvest with various closures, restrictions, permit hunt zones and reporting mechanisms for all users.

    We are not all a bunch of rabid tree huggers as some pro-development factions would name us but we can be a pain in the posterior for any who think to rape and pillage one of the few remaining reservoirs of natural systems in Canada. Rational and progressive development is the order of the day and environmental stewardship is expected with today's technology.
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  7. #6  
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    The speed of rewilding depends on the extent of the damage to the original climax ecosystem plus the extent of the geographical area damaged, all other things being equal. Pripyat/Chernobyl shows how fast a surrounding wilderness can take over an urban environment, however, a friend who has studied rainforest ecology at the Durrell institute at Canterbury told me that current best estimates for full restoration of climax rain forest in logged out swathes of SE Asia and South America are in excess of twenty thousand years.
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