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Thread: Oyster farms, and aquaculture would benefit salt water yes?

  1. #1 Oyster farms, and aquaculture would benefit salt water yes? 
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    I believe it does.


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  3. #2  
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    Only if you can find areas of ocean water that are

    1) shallow and near enough to shore for efficient farming
    2) unaffected, and unlikely to be affected, by agricultural or urban storm, sewage, fertiliser, animal waste runoff
    3) not subject to the ocean acidification currently wrecking oyster farming on the NW Pacific coast of the USA.

    I have no idea what benefits "salt water" might need - other than reduction of the multitudinous varieties of human caused pollution of waters entering the sea and reducing atmospheric CO2 to get the acid-base balance of ocean waters back to the levels of 50-100 years ago.


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    We grow most of California'a oysters in our Bay. We've been farming them for years, and I have known a few of the farmers. They are far secluded out in the bay, and yes in salt water. They are not located anywhere close to people or even fishing boats. Today, Humboldt Bay's five shellfish growers produce more oysters than anywhere else in California; some are consumed locally, but many are exported. In 2009, the California Legislature called Humboldt Bay the Oyster Capital of California. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch refers to Humboldt-grown oysters as a "best-choice" seafood because, among other things, the harvest of them has a low impact on the ecosystem and other habitats -- a nod, you could say, to those changes in farming practices.
    Humboldt Bay also is the only estuary in California free of the diseases that have impacted shellfish elsewhere, and thus is the only place in the state certified to grow clam and oyster seed for export, said longtime local shellfish grower Ted Kuiper. (Kuiper has since retired and sold off his business and leases to other farmers. He now serves as a mentor for up-and-comers.) Three of Humboldt Bay's growers export seed to some 60 farms along the West Coast from British Columbia to Mexico.
    Another fun fact: One oyster can filter 17 gallons of water a day. And you don't have to do anything other than put them out there in the water -- carefully, minding those other inhabitants -- where they can do their thing.
    All it takes is "clean water, naturally occurring phytoplankton, tide energy and sunlight" to grow shellfish, The World Is Yours, Oyster Farmer | News | The Journal
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    Good for salt water...bad for the native species of oysters which are displaced by the non-native commercial varieties.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Good for salt water...bad for the native species of oysters which are displaced by the non-native commercial varieties.
    It is my understanding, that that started with native species. They grow however others also, I believe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Good for salt water...bad for the native species of oysters which are displaced by the non-native commercial varieties.
    It is my understanding, that that started with native species. They grow however others also, I believe.
    The native oysters are nearly gone.
    Once-abundant West Coast oysters near extinction - SFGate
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  8. #7  
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    I think aquculture is a very good thing to feed a hungry world but it requires clean ocean water, it does not generate it. In fact I think I read something about the "food" introduced to feed the crop animal actually causing eutriphication (sp) and destroying all fish life in the effected localities.
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    Most activities involved with aqua culture impact the surrounding areas and in some cases introduction of new species creates competition or disease to the existing species. Oysters do clean the waters in areas they are farmed but the use of chemicals to control spartina or burrowing shrimp might not. I don't think any of these activities affect salinity in ocean water.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    I think aquculture is a very good thing to feed a hungry world but it requires clean ocean water, it does not generate it. In fact I think I read something about the "food" introduced to feed the crop animal actually causing eutriphication (sp) and destroying all fish life in the effected localities.
    Considering we are a fishing town....if that were the case they fishermen would be up in arms to say the least. They have depended on it forever. We take care of our streams and our fish. It is one of our only major industries. Fish, farming, dairy and tourism ...that is it, where I live in Cali. Marine Biology is a huge point of study at HSU
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    Rather than oysters (particularly oysters) being good for water quality, I think it's the other way around. If you can grow oysters commercially in a particular area that meets the usual location requirements for growing oysters, that's a good sign that the water quality is pretty good.

    If you've previously been able to grow them and they start dying on you, it might be increasing acidity or temperature, but it's more often pollution from urban or agricultural runoff.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Rather than oysters (particularly oysters) being good for water quality, I think it's the other way around. If you can grow oysters commercially in a particular area that meets the usual location requirements for growing oysters, that's a good sign that the water quality is pretty good.

    If you've previously been able to grow them and they start dying on you, it might be increasing acidity or temperature, but it's more often pollution from urban or agricultural runoff.
    They have been growing them here for about 30 plus years with no problem. We are not industrial. We are rural, fishing, ranching, dairy and tourism mostly.
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    Oyster beds in SW Washington have used pesticides on sand shrimp and herbicides on grasses that over take oyster beds. http://longbeach.wsu.edu/shellfish/documents/chrisgrueuwtoxicclass2007.pdf

    A
    tlantic salmon have escaped net pens and have returned to spawning grounds.
    http://wdfw.wa.gov/ais/salmo_salar/

    P
    en raised fish in open water have been the cause of parasitic infections and disease, occasionally spreading the problem to the indigenous species.
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    Quote Originally Posted by pineapple007 View Post
    Oyster beds in SW Washington have used pesticides on sand shrimp and herbicides on grasses that over take oyster beds. http://longbeach.wsu.edu/shellfish/documents/chrisgrueuwtoxicclass2007.pdf

    A
    tlantic salmon have escaped net pens and have returned to spawning grounds.
    http://wdfw.wa.gov/ais/salmo_salar/

    P
    en raised fish in open water have been the cause of parasitic infections and disease, occasionally spreading the problem to the indigenous species.
    Doesn't apply here. I can't speak for WA state or Long beach...I only know what they do here.
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  15. #14  
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    Aquaculture is like any other human activity. It can be good or bad. Some forms are excellent, with water being purified in the process. Other kinds are bad. Salmon farming, for example, requires food to be given to the salmon. That food is often ground up wild fish, which increases the fishing pressure on wild stocks. Sometimes it is Antarctic krill, which means whale food is being removed, reducing the chances of whale stocks to improve.

    Here in New Zealand, we culture shellfish. Green lipped mussels grow big, and are a very healthy food, brimming with omega 3 fatty acids and protein, and assorted vitamins and minerals. They are grown in clean ocean water, and simply filter feed in the good old natural way. Ditto for our oyster farms.

    Other forms of aquaculture may be harmful. Each must be judged on its own merits.
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeptic View Post
    Aquaculture is like any other human activity. It can be good or bad. Some forms are excellent, with water being purified in the process. Other kinds are bad. Salmon farming, for example, requires food to be given to the salmon. That food is often ground up wild fish, which increases the fishing pressure on wild stocks. Sometimes it is Antarctic krill, which means whale food is being removed, reducing the chances of whale stocks to improve.

    Here in New Zealand, we culture shellfish. Green lipped mussels grow big, and are a very healthy food, brimming with omega 3 fatty acids and protein, and assorted vitamins and minerals. They are grown in clean ocean water, and simply filter feed in the good old natural way. Ditto for our oyster farms.

    Other forms of aquaculture may be harmful. Each must be judged on its own merits.
    Ours are farmed the same in Hawai'i and in ACV. I won't eat farmed salmon. Farmed trout, however is raised differently from what I understand. Please correct me if I am wrong.
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