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Thread: Industrial Hemp and Biofuel

  1. #1 Industrial Hemp and Biofuel 
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    I once did some research on industrial hemp and I read that it can be used to make biofuel. I found some details that sounded like a great alternative to fossil fuels. For one it's nontoxic, it's safer to store because it has a flashpoint around 325 degrees Fahrenheit(my memory is a little foggy), and it can be used in current combustion engines with "little modification". Most importantly, it consumes carbon dioxide because it's a plant, so any CO2 created during combustion has already been consumed from the plant growth. Because industrial hemp contains very little tetrahydrocannabinol (about .4% where marijuana contains about 18%), so you cannot get high from it, why is this plant not utilized for a fuel source? the only reason I can think of is due to corporate greed that has control over the fuel industry. Any perspective on something I may be missing?


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  3. #2 Henry knew it way back when... 
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    Henry Ford developed an auto that utilized hemp derived products in its manufacture and operation:

    Hemp plastic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    74 Years Ago, Henry Ford Predicted Hemp Cars Powered by Biofuels - Green Living Ideas

    As Android41 stated the hemp used does not have a high percentage of the chemical that makes you high. (I am NOT a stoner!)

    Hemp seems to be a valuable resource that needs to be exploited in order to cut our dependency on fossil fuels.


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  4. #3  
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    Great! I'm glad someone agrees. From my research I found that when marijuana prohibition was introduced, hemp was also part of the prohibition (inexplicably). It is inferred that hemp would threaten the oil and cotton industry, therefore it was banned with marijuana. This gives me faith that global warming and oil dependency can be solved because we have the tools right in front of us, the world just has to decide to use them... >_>
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  5. #4  
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    The anti-weed people suffer from terrible paranoias. If I'm not mistaken, the predicted problem is that weed would get grown in the same fields as hemp, and the police would be unable to detect it because of it not looking different enough. However, I'm pretty sure the plants do look substantially different. That's just how paranoia works.

    When you've got a large group of people who are all organized to fight something, it's really hard to convince them to pass up an opportunity for battle.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman efbjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Android41 View Post
    Great! I'm glad someone agrees. From my research I found that when marijuana prohibition was introduced, hemp was also part of the prohibition (inexplicably). It is inferred that hemp would threaten the oil and cotton industry, therefore it was banned with marijuana. This gives me faith that global warming and oil dependency can be solved because we have the tools right in front of us, the world just has to decide to use them... >_>
    Just remembering about some some of things I read about that can be produced from hemp:

    Plastics, biodiesel, ethanol, paper, fabrics, rope, and the remainder of the hemp that is not processed can be used for animal feed.

    You can see where a lot of industries would be impacted positively, and negatively, by using hemp production:

    Foreign and domestic oil production would be reduced by using hemp-derived plastics, biodiesel and ethanol.

    Domestic food production (eg.- meat) would benefit from reduced production costs and lower prices to the consumer, as corn and soybean crops now being used for fuel ethanol production were returned to the feeding of livestock. The hemp byproducts would also be used to feed the livestock.

    Paper and fabric production would benefit from a cheaper source of raw material.
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