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Thread: Test Global Warming?

  1. #1 Test Global Warming? 
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    If I want to test whether or not CO2 affects the temperature how would I go about doing this?

    Hypothesis: CO2 makes the temperature warmer.

    Method: Obtain three containers...
    Container A, would have no CO2 inside it
    Container B, would have CO2 concentration that is currently in our environment (control)
    Container C, would have significantly more CO2 then the one in our environment.

    Leave the three containers out in the sun and collect the temperatures of each container every 2 hours.

    Compare the temperatures of each containers.

    Now the problem with this test...
    Because I need the ratio of CO2 and normal gas in each containers to be different but the total amount of gas in each containers to be same.

    Would it be accurate to say that, if the air pressure of Container A is the same as the air pressure of Container B, then the total amount of gas in both container would be the same?

    If it isn't, then how can I make this test work? I can't just put the same "total" amount of gas, but different air pressures because I read somewhere in my physics book that air pressures affect temperatures (such as the temperature at which the water boils is different at different pressure)


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  3. #2  
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    Failed design. In these cases, the container would act as a greenhouse, so you will derive no useful data. The atmophere is a massive semi-open system, extending from the surface to 15-100 km, depending on where you want to draw the line, with hundreds of physical processes going on, all over the entire surface of the planet. The greenhouse effects of CO2 and other greenhouse gases are well known.


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKRTJDWLS91 View Post
    Hypothesis: CO2 makes the temperature warmer.
    Flawed hypothesis as well. Poorly worded and loosely defined. The important thing is to measure the absorption of infra-red radiation by CO2. Here is one possible experiment: Experiment - The Greenhouse Effect
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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  5. #4  
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    I was watching my local news last night. And this story came up, a group of scientists came out and said, "global warming and habitat destruction ex. ex." will damage Earth, as much as an asteroid hitting Earth.

    Not good!!!
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne View Post
    Failed design. In these cases, the container would act as a greenhouse, so you will derive no useful data. The atmophere is a massive semi-open system, extending from the surface to 15-100 km, depending on where you want to draw the line, with hundreds of physical processes going on, all over the entire surface of the planet. The greenhouse effects of CO2 and other greenhouse gases are well known.

    Well... technically, Earth's atmosphere does the same thing as a greenhouse according to NASA.

    Earth's atmosphere does the same thing as the greenhouse. Gases in the
    atmosphere such as carbon dioxide do what the roof of a greenhouse does. During
    the day, the Sun shines through the atmosphere. Earth's surface warms up in the
    sunlight. At night, Earth's surface cools, releasing the heat back into the air.
    But some of the heat is trapped by the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
    That's what keeps our Earth a warm and cozy 59 degrees Fahrenheit, on
    average.
    Source link: Climate Kids: What is the greenhouse effect?

    (P.S. If you disagree with this statement you are also disagreeing with NASA)

    The question is whether or not the presence of CO2 causes increase in temperature.

    If I get two containers, one filled with CO2 and other container without CO2 and shine it with a consistant heat source...
    (Imagine the container being the earth and the heat source being the sun)

    Then measure the temperature inside both of these containers after it has reached equilibrium (stable temperature inside each container)
    would the container filled with CO2 be hotter then the Container filled with gases other then CO2?

    Other question would be, which container heats up faster... which container heats up slower

    Edit: After some more thinking, I think it would be best if I also hang a black spherical object inside the container to act as the ground, as majority of the heat from the sun is absorbed by the ground which then dissipates to the atmosphere (main reason why it is colder the higher up you go... you get further and further from the ground which absorbs majority of the heat.)

    This would also allow the observation of Day/Night...

    For example, shine the heat/light source on one side of the sphere, then measure the difference in temperature in the other side of the sphere...

    the place on the sphere where the light is shining is day, where it is not shining is the night
    Last edited by QKRTJDWLS91; June 11th, 2012 at 07:27 PM.
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  7. #6  
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    QKR...... , do you know how labs usually measure the amount of carbon dioxide in an air sample? By infrared gas sensors that look at the long wave radiation absorption at certain frequencies.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    QKR...... , do you know how labs usually measure the amount of carbon dioxide in an air sample? By infrared gas sensors that look at the long wave radiation absorption at certain frequencies.
    well, I kinda have an idea on how to do this now

    Air tight container (imagining it to be cubic see-through) , String, Black Sphere, Thermometer, Washable marker, ruler, something like a spray can that shoots out CO2... (Can't really think of anything that does...).]

    1. Use the ruler and measure out the center of the outer side of the cube and make a mark on the center
    (One way to do this would be by marking the half of width and length of all four the square side, and drawing straight line across from the marked sides)
    2. Measure the and cut string so that its length is a bit longer then [ (Height of the container) - (Diameter of the Sphere/2) ] extra length is there so that one can attach the string to the container and the sphere
    3. Attach one end of the string to the marked "center" of the cube from the inside and other end to the center/top the sphere. (Gotta look into how to do this)
    Close the lid fo the container

    Make another copy of this but this time, before closing the lid of the container, spray the inside with CO2 so that it displaces almost if not all the air in the container then close the lid before too much air seeps into the container

    Finding a canned CO2 would be tricky...
    I am wondering if blowing into a "big balloon" or "multiple balloons" and blowing the air that was int he balloon into the container would work, (since we breath out CO2...) I doubt it though
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  9. #8  
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    Finding a canned CO2 would be tricky...
    Chunks of dry ice aren't that hard to find.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKRTJDWLS91 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne View Post
    Failed design. In these cases, the container would act as a greenhouse, so you will derive no useful data. The atmophere is a massive semi-open system, extending from the surface to 15-100 km, depending on where you want to draw the line, with hundreds of physical processes going on, all over the entire surface of the planet. The greenhouse effects of CO2 and other greenhouse gases are well known.

    Well... technically, Earth's atmosphere does the same thing as a greenhouse according to NASA.
    My point was, that is not the same thing as your "experiment" That's all. Confining greenhouse gases in glass jars is not the same as a freely circulating atmosphere. That's what I said. Try reading it again.

    Your "test" is invalid by design.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by QKRTJDWLS91 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne View Post
    Failed design. In these cases, the container would act as a greenhouse, so you will derive no useful data. The atmophere is a massive semi-open system, extending from the surface to 15-100 km, depending on where you want to draw the line, with hundreds of physical processes going on, all over the entire surface of the planet. The greenhouse effects of CO2 and other greenhouse gases are well known.

    Well... technically, Earth's atmosphere does the same thing as a greenhouse according to NASA.
    My point was, that is not the same thing as your "experiment" That's all. Confining greenhouse gases in glass jars is not the same as a freely circulating atmosphere. That's what I said. Try reading it again.

    Your "test" is invalid by design.
    I see, So, the source of heat should be from below the container.

    The gas which is heat up will rise to the top of the container, while the " cooler gas at the top of the container" will fall down toward the heat source... Thus creating circulation.

    Problem would be in adjusting the intensity of the heat source
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Finding a canned CO2 would be tricky...
    Chunks of dry ice aren't that hard to find.
    Oh right! didnt think of that
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  13. #12  
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    No the problem is that a confined container is nothing like the atmosphere!
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  14. #13  
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    If you want to do this test for yourself, first have a look at all the various ways other people have done it. Conceptually it's pretty straightforward, but you do have to take some care in the way you set it up to be certain you're really testing what you think you're testing.

    Here's one example from a geology professor. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ot5n9m4whaw

    Google infrared absorption CO2 and check out the various descriptions and videos.

    If you're super keen to get on top of the science itself, go to Google Scholar and do the same thing. This is one area where the science is so well established that it won't matter if you choose a paper that's pretty old - go for one with lots of citations.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKRTJDWLS91 View Post
    Finding a canned CO2 would be tricky...
    The setup I linked to above appeared to be using something like calcium carbonate and acid to generate the CO2.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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