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Thread: Why Fukushima Reactor So Close to the Sea?

  1. #101  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by galexander
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    I can see why folks are frustrated. A forum isn't a good way to learn basics of thermodynamics.
    --

    But try to think of it this way. After spinning the turbines you get a lot of steam that's no longer in a useful form to do any more work. You can dump all that steam directly into the environment, much like a 19th century locomotive, and wasteful of water, or leverage the environment to cool it down using the cooling towers so you retain most of the water.

    At that point you can re-use the water, use energy to turn it back into high-pressure steam so it can in-turn be used to do work to turn turbines to produce electricity etc.
    But you have failed to acknowledge my point that the Condenser is also carrying out a vital role in the energy production.

    It is creating the suction effect which is driving the turbine.

    Without the suction at the Condenser the pressure from the steam would quickly come to an equilibrium in the closed system.
    Thats one of the reasons that the reactors have pumps on the water supply system (which went out at Fukashima, hence the water supply problems)
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  2. #102  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum
    Quote Originally Posted by galexander
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox
    I can see why folks are frustrated. A forum isn't a good way to learn basics of thermodynamics.
    --

    But try to think of it this way. After spinning the turbines you get a lot of steam that's no longer in a useful form to do any more work. You can dump all that steam directly into the environment, much like a 19th century locomotive, and wasteful of water, or leverage the environment to cool it down using the cooling towers so you retain most of the water.

    At that point you can re-use the water, use energy to turn it back into high-pressure steam so it can in-turn be used to do work to turn turbines to produce electricity etc.
    But you have failed to acknowledge my point that the Condenser is also carrying out a vital role in the energy production.

    It is creating the suction effect which is driving the turbine.

    Without the suction at the Condenser the pressure from the steam would quickly come to an equilibrium in the closed system.
    Thats one of the reasons that the reactors have pumps on the water supply system (which went out at Fukashima, hence the water supply problems)
    Returning to the subject of Fukushima, it is quite apparent from the above discussions that the Japanese did not have to build the reactor on the coastline as they did.

    They could easily have built it further inland on higher ground near a river or lake.

    However the reactor hit by the tsunami at Fukushima is not the only nuclear reactor at the coast in Japan. There is a whole string of them.
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