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Thread: Use of Co2 for Oil Recovery

  1. #1 Use of Co2 for Oil Recovery 
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    While the world is making all out efforts to ensure that we emit as little CO2 as possible into the atmosphere, there is one industry that is already pumping and storing CO2 into the ground, and for a useful purpose. And that is - surprise, surprise - the oil industry.

    In the process known as EOR (enhanced oil recovery), oil companies have been pumping CO2 into oil reservoirs to enhance the amount of oil that can be recovered from that oil field. And it appears the use of CO2 for oil recovery this could be a multibillion biz opportunity.

    OK, let's be honest. EOR cannot take care of all our CO2 emissions, which run into about 35 billion T per year. So the traditional methods of carbon sequestration will have to play a role, or someone needs to come up with a way of making many more such products out of CO2.

    What are your thoughts?


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  3. #2  
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    So the traditional methods of carbon sequestration
    There really aren't any in common use right now.


    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
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  4. #3  
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    It's not a straight forward things.
    The physics of CO2 mixing with oil is really complex. The behaviour of reservoirs fluids during EOR (enhanced Oil Recovery) operations with CO2 is not trivial, especially the mobility and the sweep of the CO2.
    One other method for carbon sequestration is the re-injection of CO2 in the ground. Storage of CO2 in geological reservoir rocks is a very viable option and it is used already in many places in the world.

    What is important to look at is the cycle of the CO2 storage solution. Because one day or another, it will be going in the atmosphere. The important is to find a solution with a longer storage cycle, not to 'eliminate' the CO2, this is impossible. BTW, plants are not eliminating CO2. When they die, they release most of their carbon in CO2 and a part get trapped in the ground for a longer cycle.
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  5. #4  
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    One thing that's sometimes overlooked is that natural, which produces less CO2 than oil when burned, often produces a lot of CO2 at the wellhead, which is vented to the atmosphere. In Wyoming, for example, the state govt. is finally beginning to force gas producers to find alternatives to dumping their CO2 in the air. These include pipelines to oilfields for EOR, and another technology that's ExxonMobil has been using for their feelgood ads on TV called Controlled Freeze Zone, where the CO2 is frozen out of the natural gas stream.
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  6. #5 Updates on Exxon Mobil CFZ Cryogenic CO2 Separation Process? 
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    I heard about a cryogenic process (CFZ) for separation of CO2 a few months back; this effort was being pioneered by ExxonMobil.

    While at first sight it looks like an effective idea, I wonder how much it could cost given that it could take a considerable amount of energy to cryogenically cool the CO2. And how well the costs will compare to other separation / capture mechanisms such as the amine based capture mechanisms.

    Any thoughts?
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  7. #6  
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    The basic idea of CFZ (which I mentioned in your other thread) is to increase energy efficiency compared to conventional amine processes. In amine systems the gas is reduced from reservoir pressure to essentially atmospheric so that the CO2 can be boiled off from the amine. It is then vented to atmosphere. If the acid gas (CO2 + H2S) is to be captured and reinjected it has be recompressed, and cooled to remove heat of compression, which all uses a great deal of energy.

    CFZ maintains a relatively high pressure through the process and the acid gas product is a cold liquid so additional compression and cooling is greatly reduced. The economics still depend on several other issues.
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  8. #7  
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    Power_guy was a spammer and his/her account has been terminated. He/she made a pretense for wanting discussion, but the only intent was to unfairly promote and drive traffic to his/her own blog.

    This effort was dishonest and deceptive and, as such, you one might be inclined to take anything written at that blog-site with a grain of salt. Keep in mind this is a non-iodized salt and, therefore, you might find yourself becoming weak, tired and depressed since the thyroxine and triiodothyronine in your thyroid isn't being properly regulated.
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  9. #8  
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    Well, I didn't visit his/her blog, being sufficiently skeptical to generally avoid such siren calls. Apparently the cretinism hasn't quite crept in yet. My salt is iodized.
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