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Thread: Does biochar application really can combat climate change?

  1. #1 Does biochar application really can combat climate change? 
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    In recent years, biochar production and application have been widely performing over the world. Therefore, numerous papers have documented that biochar application could substantially mitigate GHGs emissions, and thus as a powerful measurement for combating climate change in the future! Personally, I just want to konw whether this method is "green" measurement?[/b]


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  3. #2  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    What is "green measurement?" I'm completely unfamiliar with that term, whether in context of terra preta, biochar, or other.


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    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    What is "green measurement?" I'm completely unfamiliar with that term, whether in context of terra preta, biochar, or other.
    I am so sorry, my english is poor. I want to describe that whether biochar applications will be result in some other negative effects on eco-enviroment.
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  5. #4  
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
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    No, I don't think so, but am not certain. Maybe you can learn more here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta
    http://terrapreta.bioenergylists.org/
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  6. #5  
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    Thank you so much! I recently focus on the effect of biochar appliction on nitrogen and carbon processes from rice fields, and thus I want to communicate with others about this issue.
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  7. #6 Research & Policy 
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    Agriculture allowed our cultural accent and Agriculture will now prevent our descent.

    Wise Land management; Organic farming and afforestation can build back our soil carbon,

    Biochar allows the soil food web to build much more recalcitrant organic carbon, ( living biomass & Glomalins) in addition to the carbon in the biochar.

    Every 1 ton of Biomass yields 1/3 ton Charcoal for soil Sequestration (= to 1 Ton CO2e) + Bio-Gas & Bio-oil fuels = to 1MWh exported electricity, so is a totally virtuous, carbon negative energy cycle.

    Biochar viewed as soil Infrastructure; The old saw;
    "Feed the Soil Not the Plants" becomes;
    "Feed, Cloth and House the Soil, utilities included !".
    Free Carbon Condominiums with carboxyl group fats in the pantry and hydroxyl alcohol in the mini bar.
    Build it and the Wee-Beasties will come.
    Microbes like to sit down when they eat.
    By setting this table we expand husbandry to whole new orders & Kingdoms of life.
    ( These oxidised surface charges; carbonyl. hydroxyl, carboxylic acids, and lactones or quinones, have as well a role as signaling substances towards bacteria, fungi and plants.)

    This is what I try to get across to Farmers, as to how I feel about the act of returning carbon to the soil. An act of penitence and thankfulness for the civilization we have created. Farmers are the Soil Sink Bankers, once carbon has a price, they will be laughing all the way to it.
    Unlike CCS which only reduces emissions, biochar systems draw down CO2 every energy cycle, closing a circle back to support the soil food web. The photosynthetic "capture" collectors are up and running, the "storage" sink is in operation just under our feet. Pyrolysis conversion plants are the only infrastructure we need to build out.

    For those looking for an overview of biochar and its benefits, These authors have done a very nice job of distilling a great deal of information about biochar and applying it to the US context:

    US Focused Biochar report: Assessment of Biochar's Benefits for the USA
    http://www.biochar-us.org/pdf%20file...ort_lowres.pdf

    NASA’s Space Archaeology; $364K Terra Preta Program
    http://archaeologyexcavations.blogsp...satellite.html


    Another significant aspect of low cost Biomass cook stoves that produce char is removal of BC aerosols and no respiratory disease emissions. At Scale, replacing "Three Stone" stoves the health benefits would equal eradication of Malaria & Aids combined.
    Three serious efforts at producing biochar by cookstoves are the efforts by Nat Mulcahy's WorldStove; http://worldstove.com/
    Paul Anderson's Champion TLUD (and offshoots from that design); http://www.bioenergylists.org/andersontludconstruction
    Rob Flanagan's design efforts mainly in China, Flana Stove; http://bionecho.org/tptut/en/production.php
    and Dr. Reddy's GoodStove; http://www.goodstove.com/

    Hillary Has gotten on the Biochar Bus;
    100 million clean-burning stoves in kitchens around the world.
    http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2010/09/147494.htm

    The Biochar Fund:
    Exceptional results from biochar experiment in Cameroon
    http://scitizen.com/screens/blogPage...tribution=3011
    The broad smiles of 1500 subsistence farmers say it all ( that , and the size of the Biochar corn root balls )
    http://biocharfund.org/index.php?opt...d=55&Itemid=75

    WorldStoves in Haiti ; http://www.charcoalproject.org/2010/...ove-a-mission/ and

    NSF Awards $1.6 million in grants;
    BREAD: Biochar Inoculants for Enabling Smallholder Agriculture
    http://iapnews.wordpress.com/2010/09...search-grants/





    Biochar data base;
    TP-REP
    http://terrapreta.bioenergylists.org/?q=node

    Disscusion Groups;
    The group home page location, General orientation:
    Biochar (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/biochar/
    Biochar POLICY;
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biochar-policy
    Biochar Soils;
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/biochar-soils/
    Biochar Production;
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/biochar-production/

    Earth Science Terra Preta Forum, Great for students;
    Terra Preta - Science Forums
    http://hypography.com/forums/terra-preta/
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  8. #7 Whole ecological Services 
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    Recent NATURE STUDY;
    Sustainable biochar to mitigate global climate change
    http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal...comms1053.html

    Not talked about in this otherwise comprehensive study are the climate and whole ecological implications of new , higher value, applications of chars.

    First,
    the in situ remediation of a vast variety of toxic agents in soils and sediments.
    Biochar Sorption of Contaminants;
    http://www.biorenew.iastate.edu/even...vironment.html

    Dr. Lima's work; Specialized Characterization Methods for Biochar http://www.biorenew.iastate.edu/even...erization.html
    And at USDA;
    The Ultimate Trash To Treasure: *ARS Research Turns Poultry Waste into Toxin-grabbing Char
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/IS/AR/archiv...5/char0705.htm

    Second,
    the uses as a feed ration for livestock to reduce GHG emissions and increase disease resistance.

    Third,
    Recent work by C. Steiner showing a 52% reduction of NH3 loss when char is used as a composting accelerator. This will have profound value added consequences for the commercial composting industry by reduction of their GHG emissions and the sale of compost as a nitrogen fertilizer.


    Since we have filled the air , filling the seas to full, Soil is the Only Beneficial place left.
    Carbon to the Soil, the only ubiquitous and economic place to put it.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Professor Wild Cobra's Avatar
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    I would be curious what the cost of such plans would be, and how the costs would be rated.
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  10. #9 Ball Park Figures 
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    Here are the BallPark numbers for a dairy & poultry farm next door;

    The combination of Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) grants &
    Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) &
    Nutrient credits for N & P, and
    Exported electricity &
    Compost & Biochar sales is a hefty income stream from Gasification/Pyrolysis manure management.
    The rough figures I've seen show for a 16 tons/day livestock manure feedstock =
    Electricity.....................................$ 125K / year
    REAP & BCAP....................................60K / year
    Nutrient Credits...............................200K / year
    4Tons/Day Compost/chars............... 250K /year

    This is a base load of 2MW , animals doo 24/7

    The farmer now rents land just to rid himself of the manure, with haulage, that cost him now $100K per year.

    Three to 5 year pay back period, than all the doo is gravy
    Whats not to like?

    Once Carbon Has a price; say a conservative $30 /Ton CO2e, that would add another $30K per year
    (Gasifier char is only 20% carbon. While Pyrolysis chars are 90% carbon and would yield $117K , but 1/3 less electricity produced)

    Companies;......... http://terrapreta.bioenergylists.org/company

    Products;............ http://terrapreta.bioenergylists.org/materials

    Cheers,
    Erich
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  11. #10 A GREAT BOOK ABOUT BIOCHAR 
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    I hope this it will help you
    http://biochar-books.com/
    In the book you will read about the challenges of designing low-emissions biochar production systems from small-scale stoves to farm-scale pyrolyzers. Another section of the book is devoted to explaining simple tests to characterize biochar and methods for conducting valid field trials.
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  12. #11  
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    Another thread about water aeration caused me to think about the biochar initiative. On the one-hand, I see great potential in its application. On the other hand, I am also disturbed by the apparent lack of testing that has been done compared to the amount of lobbying.

    The proposed use of biochar in the U.S. is for no-till methodology in large-scale agricultural practices. Most of the reports available on biochar come from those who stand to make a lot of money on its application, especially if used in the wake of implemented carbon markets. What one sees very little of in these reports is the study of the proposed methods (no-till) or confirmed results of nutrient immobility. Most of the beneficial aspects reported have been short-term and/or tested within the historically used structured soils, not the no-till methods proposed. The no-till method would have largely different dynamics.

    I would love for unbiased study to confirm all of the "save the world" hype that the political initiative has injected, because if it does, there could be a very beneficial decreased necessity for applications of fertilizers due to a reduction of leached pollutants into our watershed. If it does not, and nutrient immobility kicks in, we are left with a much larger problem of not only infertile, but polluted soils which would then have to be left to decompose on their own. The natural process of degradation would then release drastically increased amounts of carbon, as well as previously locked nutrients. If any studies fully addressing these concerns are made available, I might be able to change my mind, but as of yet, all I see at work is a large political machine.
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  13. #12  
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    See: Biochar effects on soil biota - A review

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...38071711001805



    Johannes Lehmann, Matthias Rillig, Janice Thies, Caroline A. Masiello, William C. Hockaday, David Crowley



    a b s t r a c t

    Soil amendment with biochar is evaluated globally as a means to improve soil fertility and to mitigate

    climate change. However, the effects of biochar on soil biota have received much less attention than its

    effects on soil chemical properties. A review of the literature reveals a significant number of early studies

    on biochar-type materials as soil amendments either for managing pathogens, as inoculant carriers or for

    manipulative experiments to sorb signaling compounds or toxins. However, no studies exist in the soil

    biology literature that recognize the observed large variations of biochar physico-chemical properties. This

    shortcoming has hampered insight into mechanisms by which biochar influences soil microorganisms,

    fauna and plant roots. Additional factors limiting meaningful interpretation of many datasets are the

    clearly demonstrated sorption properties that interfere with standard extraction procedures for soil

    microbial biomass or enzyme assays, and the confounding effects of varying amounts of minerals. In most

    studies, microbial biomass has been found to increase as a result of biochar additions, with significant

    changes in microbial community composition and enzyme activities that may explain biogeochemical

    effects of biochar on element cycles, plant pathogens, and crop growth. Yet, very little is known about the

    mechanisms through which biochar affects microbial abundance and community composition. The effects

    of biochar on soil fauna are even less understood than its effects on microorganisms, apart from several

    notable studies on earthworms. It is clear, however, that sorption phenomena, pH and physical properties

    of biochars such as pore structure, surface area and mineral matter play important roles in determining

    how different biochars affect soil biota. Observations on microbial dynamics lead to the conclusion of

    a possible improved resource use due to co-location of various resources in and around biochars. Sorption

    and thereby inactivation of growth-inhibiting substances likely plays a role for increased abundance of soil

    biota. No evidence exists so far for direct negative effects of biochars on plant roots. Occasionally observed

    decreases in abundance of mycorrhizal fungi are likely caused by concomitant increases in nutrient

    availability, reducing the need for symbionts. In the short term, the release of a variety of organic molecules

    from fresh biochar may in some cases be responsible for increases or decreases in abundance and activity

    of soil biota. A road map for future biochar research must include a systematic appreciation of different

    biochar-types and basic manipulative experiments that unambiguously identify the interactions between

    biochar and soil biota.

    _ 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved



    The utility of high-P manure char as in situ sorbents of heavy metals in conjunction with biomass chars to stimulate MYC & plant growth for
    phytoremed*iation, offers a unique set of tools for both concentrat*ion & vitrified sequestrat*ion and binding toxic agents uptake in the food cycle.

    Biochar Ontario has recognized the Biochar silver lining for Japan's disaster. The positive PR for Char as solution for this seemingly impossible task would far surpass the 2008 NGM article on soils.

    The Nuclear Forest Recovery Zone
    Paul Stamets, mycologist
    His short essay explains how an ecological approach can use mushrooms and native deciduous trees to literally "suck up" the radioactiv*ity from a nuclear fallout area which eventually leads to capturing with intent to refine the radioactiv*e mushrooms into ash or Biochar and thus trap in glass or other materials, rendering it inactive
    http://www*.justmeans*.com/-Nucl*ear...ne/47319*.html

    Note that our Japanese partners in the Japan Biochar Associatio*n - JBA have worked on project for the bioremedia*tion of radioactiv*e substances with some specialist*s in the field, and have some data that show that various soil inhabiting fungi, including some edible mycorrhiza*l fungi, will take up the substances like cesium

    Cd uptake in Rice

    IBI just posted this 2 year study on reduced Cd uptake in Rice. The abstract doesn't say what the yields were but I guess that's besides the point of 50% reduced Cd uptake.;

    http://ojs.cnr.ncsu.edu/index.php/Bi...Rice_Cd_Uptake

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