Notices
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Oil spill assistance

  1. #1 Oil spill assistance 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7
    This thread is designed to facilitate discussion on ways to stop the flow of oil into the ocean.

    Surely this is an engineering challenge that a group of enlightened minds like this board must be able to solve ?


    My opinion is that they could create a new ocean floor over top of the leak to stop the flow.

    Why not use super tankers dropping large volumes of new ocean floor material over the leak. Any material that would best stop the flow. Maybe heavy sand ?

    Maybe you could even pump a material directly down to the source of the problem. Like freeze it in a block of ice sort of idea ??


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2 Re: Oil spill assistance 
    Forum Professor Wild Cobra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,140
    Quote Originally Posted by HashGod
    This thread is designed to facilitate discussion on ways to stop the flow of oil into the ocean.

    Surely this is an engineering challenge that a group of enlightened minds like this board must be able to solve ?


    My opinion is that they could create a new ocean floor over top of the leak to stop the flow.

    Why not use super tankers dropping large volumes of new ocean floor material over the leak. Any material that would best stop the flow. Maybe heavy sand ?
    How would you keep the natural pressure from blowing through anything you place over it?
    Quote Originally Posted by HashGod
    Maybe you could even pump a material directly down to the source of the problem. Like freeze it in a block of ice sort of idea ??
    Have to get to the fallen pipe first.
    Quote Originally Posted by HashGod
    Tell me what you think; I've got grave fears about that leak.
    I don't know how such problems are engineered to be solved. I'm sure someone has a working theory done, and maybe used it before.

    First of all, it's deep enough, a robotic submarine needs to be used. I would guess the solution make a strait cut across the pipe and thread it. Then screw an open valve to it, and close it. Not knowing any of the engineering aspects, maybe the pipe isn't think enough to be threaded. Then it would have to be welded. Now another concern, it is even strong enough to hold the pressure? I will assume it is, but I don't know.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: Oil spill assistance 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by HashGod
    This thread is designed to facilitate discussion on ways to stop the flow of oil into the ocean.

    Surely this is an engineering challenge that a group of enlightened minds like this board must be able to solve ?


    My opinion is that they could create a new ocean floor over top of the leak to stop the flow.
    BP and the company I work for and a host of others are in the process of doing exactly this. The plan is to have them in place in 12 days. A containment structure is being built around and over the two worst of the three leaking areas.

    Why not use super tankers dropping large volumes of new ocean floor material over the leak. Any material that would best stop the flow. Maybe heavy sand ?
    Won't work, the pressure is too great, one would need about a 4000 foot mountain of material to hold back the pressure. During drilling, the pressure is held back by very heavy mud in the well .... about 15,000 vertical feet of it. If the mud is not the right density it flows into the open sand formations allowing gas and light oil from the well to take its place in the well bore, the pressure holding the well back is lost and the well blows out. This is what happened. Huge hydraulic BOP (blow out preventer) valves are in place to detect this "gas kick" and slam shut..... They failed.

    A containment structure that channels the oil and gas to large risers and then flares the gas and vacuums up the oil is being devised. It is unfortunate and short sighted we did not have one ready to deploy.

    It was also short sighted not to have fireproof booms to deploy. Damn we are ignorant.

    Maybe you could even pump a material directly down to the source of the problem. Like freeze it in a block of ice sort of idea ??
    Yes precisely what is being done and has been done for 50 years to kill a blowout. Two relief wells are now being drilled, one started yesterday. They will intercept the blowout and relieve pressure so mud can be pumped back into the well to kill it. Unfortunately it could take 30-90 days to drill and kill.

    Tell me what you think; I've got grave fears about that leak.
    Me too.... We are doing all we can. Just wish we did all we could have done.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 Re: Oil spill assistance 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Cobra
    I don't know how such problems are engineered to be solved. I'm sure someone has a working theory done, and maybe used it before.

    First of all, it's deep enough, a robotic submarine needs to be used. I would guess the solution make a strait cut across the pipe and thread it. Then screw an open valve to it, and close it. Not knowing any of the engineering aspects, maybe the pipe isn't think enough to be threaded. Then it would have to be welded. Now another concern, it is even strong enough to hold the pressure? I will assume it is, but I don't know.
    There are now 8 ROV's (Remotely operated underwater vehicle) onsite. Two are still trying to repair the blowout preventer the others are working to build structures over the leaks.

    The riser is kinked and is holding back flow so they don't want to disturb it for fear that the well will cut loose with all it has and then we would have a real mess. That well is able to flow about 10-15 times as much as it is currently flowing. Cut the pipe and it just might do that.

    The pipe is not strong enough to hold back the well, It was a drilling riser never intended for the pressure and it is in a crumpled mess. Good questions though.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7
    What about dynamiting the shaft?

    If you triggered the explosion deep enough in a drill hole next to the leak surely you could collapse the well shaft in on itself
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,191
    Too much energy coming up and out of the well. It shreds anything you can stuff down it. This is the first major subsea blowout and the biggest issue with getting something down the well in the past has been that you cant get anything over the top of the well. Running small pipe down the well and pumping mud from the bottom might have been an option except for the crumpled drilling riser and nobody is going to risk removing that.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7
    Surely a blow out preventer has failed before without an entire rig just exploding and disappearing under the ocean.

    Those oil men have to appreciate the limits of society's technology and operate their activities in a safe manner. Deep sea drilling on rigs that cant handle small accidents without literally vaporizing has to stop even if it means managers forgoing big cash out options.

    Greed in its current form is a sociopath that left unchecked will destroy the world.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7
    Post was edited
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7
    Its called the hummers into the sea plan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    This is the first major subsea blowout and the biggest issue with getting something down the well in the past has been that you cant get anything over the top of the well. .
    Really. I had put you on ignore, but I decided to take a look at what nonsense you were spouting in a subject area I know something about.

    You don't consider Ixtoc a major subsea blow out? You don't think the eventual capping of that well with a large metal hemisphere was 'getting anything over the top of the well'.

    It seems your knowledge of well control is about as patchy as that on global warming. You may sound informed to the uneducated, but for someone who has been involved with well control operations (who has taught basic well control procedures to oil industry personnel) you come across as pretty flaky.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11 Re: Oil spill assistance 
    Forum Masters Degree Twit of wit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    553
    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    BP and the company I work for and a host of others are in the process of doing exactly this.
    Great news that such brilliant minds work on this problem! That means it will definitely cross the ocean! Great news indeed!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hashgod
    Those oil men have to appreciate the limits of society's technology and operate their activities in a safe manner. Deep sea drilling on rigs that cant handle small accidents without literally vaporizing has to stop even if it means (oh my god) forgoing immediate profit.
    It's worse. It seems there supposed to be some additional safety mechanism, but BP did not use it to save money.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7
    bump
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by Ophiolite
    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    This is the first major subsea blowout and the biggest issue with getting something down the well in the past has been that you cant get anything over the top of the well. .
    Really. I had put you on ignore, but I decided to take a look at what nonsense you were spouting in a subject area I know something about.

    You don't consider Ixtoc a major subsea blow out? You don't think the eventual capping of that well with a large metal hemisphere was 'getting anything over the top of the well'.
    Feel free to correct any errors you see. I intended to say of a subsea production well implyinging a mudline wellhead flange and a subsea BOP. Ixtoc, if I remember was an exploratory well. I may be wrong but the BOP was at the surface was it not?

    It seems your knowledge of well control is about as patchy as that on global warming. You may sound informed to the uneducated, but for someone who has been involved with well control operations (who has taught basic well control procedures to oil industry personnel) you come across as pretty flaky.
    Again correct my prose if you wish. I am not a well control expert nor am I any longer involve in drilling operations. I was attempting to keep it simple and understandable. I am happy I continue to amuse you with my nonsense.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by cypress
    Feel free to correct any errors you see. I intended to say of a subsea production well implyinging a mudline wellhead flange and a subsea BOP. Ixtoc, if I remember was an exploratory well. I may be wrong but the BOP was at the surface was it not?
    You are correct that it was an exploratory well, but drilled from a Sedco vessel, a semi-submersible or a drill ship. I think the former. In either case a sub-sea stack was in use. In that instance a kick occured during tripping because of swab effects, was not spotted early enough and - if I recall correctly - was never shut in at any time. Fortunately, on that occassion no lives were lost.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,191
    ok my bad
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Professor Wild Cobra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,140
    I have a question.

    I have heard an unverified account that 18 of 39 problems in the gulf had to do with the cementing process. Do any of you in the field know if this is a process required for actual quality, or something regulated to do out of fear?

    Seems to me a natural seal the ocean floor provides for itself would be better.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Cobra
    I have a question.

    I have heard an unverified account that 18 of 39 problems in the gulf had to do with the cementing process. Do any of you in the field know if this is a process required for actual quality, or something regulated to do out of fear?

    Seems to me a natural seal the ocean floor provides for itself would be better.
    WC, the cement is pumped into the void space between the casing (pipe) that lines the hole that is drilled and the rock wall of the hole itself. The casing prevents the hole from collapsing in on the production tubing like buried conduit and wires so you can pull the tubing later to work on the well. The cement prevents the hydrocarbon from migrating up the outer casing into other zones or to surface. So the cement is a must have. Can't do without it, it is required for the integrity of the well.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •