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Thread: Big Question

  1. #1 Big Question 
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    Look I've been thinking about this idea. I know that turbo-charged motors use the expelled gases of combustion to move a propel an suck more fuel to generate more power, but, is there any other use to these gases. What if, instead of leaving them in the atmosphere to generate more pollution, collect them in a container to process them later? I know there are a lot of gases in there like carbon monoxide and even unburned fuel. So, is there any use that could be given to these gases, or the only option is throw them to the atmosphere and continue global warming?


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  3. #2 Re: Big Question 
    Forum Professor Wild Cobra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vincero
    Look I've been thinking about this idea. I know that turbo-charged motors use the expelled gases of combustion to move a propel an suck more fuel to generate more power, but, is there any other use to these gases. What if, instead of leaving them in the atmosphere to generate more pollution, collect them in a container to process them later? I know there are a lot of gases in there like carbon monoxide and even unburned fuel. So, is there any use that could be given to these gases, or the only option is throw them to the atmosphere and continue global warming?
    Wow...

    Why is the assumption that these gasses cause Global Warming? Did you attend the University of Indoctrination?

    First of all. automotive technology has come a long ways. Catalytic converters change the unburned hydrocarbons, NOx, and CO to harmless gasses. The only time they don't do this is before they warm up, and if they are defective. At some point, the government will likely mandate the newer expensive designs that operate cold as well.

    Now as for carbon Dioxide. It is good for us to increase it. Just like we need oxygen to breath, plants need carbon dioxide. They are more productive for our food supply as we increase the CO2 in the atmosphere.

    As for Global Warming, there is no evidence that CO2 has anything but an insignificant increase to temperature. Two proven factors that the left and those who indoctrinate refuse to acknowledge are the increases the sun has had in emitted radiation, and the effect soot has on the albedo of the norther ice cap that Asia has been producing. These two factors alone account for more than 75% of the global warming attributed to CO2.

    One more thing. Do you drink you soda's warm or cold? I'll bet cold. Fluids to atmospheric equilibrium of gasses changes dramatically with temperature. Water can hold a rather high percentage of a gas near freezing. That diminishes to zero at boiling. When it comes to a soda, it holds CO2 real well at refrigeration temperatures around 40 F, but become very flat at 70 F. A very dramatic difference. Just the warming of the oceans over the last 300 years have caused them to release CO2. Even if we didn't have any carbon emissions of our own, we would probably have around 350 ppm because of warming.

    Warming causes increased CO2. CO2 does not cause but minimal warming. Study the Carbon Cycle and Solubility of gasses in water, and Henry's Law.


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  4. #3 Re: Big Question 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Cobra
    Just the warming of the oceans over the last 300 years have caused them to release CO2. Even if we didn't have any carbon emissions of our own, we would probably have around 350 ppm because of warming.
    Rubish.
    First off the oceans are nowhere near to saturated with Co2. Over the past they've been taking in Co2--as very clearly indicated by their increasing acidity of appx 0.1 ph (+25%).

    http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/200...GB002247.shtml
    http://royalsociety.org/displaypagedoc.asp?id=13314 (and others)

    The oceans, at least so far have been taking up Co2 as the atmosphere has been warming and so far have absorbing something like 50% of the fossil carbon we've put into the air. Due to Henry's law and surface warming, (which you mention) there's some concern the oceans ability to take up even more Carbon will diminish in the future.



    The other nail in the ocear release hypothesis is we've got a clear record of droping isotope ratios of Carbon 13 to Carbon 12 ever closer to that of fossil wood and plants which would be very different from that of ocean released carbon isotopes.

    There's virtually no doubt that the atmosphere's rising Co2 is mostly due to increase anthropomorphic burning of fossil fuels.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Vincero,

    The exhaust gases from internal combustion engines consist overwhelmingly of nitrogen, water vapor, excess oxygen and carbon dioxide. The unburned hydrocarbons and CO are extremely diluted by the main gases and it is really impractical to collect them and do anything useful with them.

    The good thing is that increased engine efficiency and catalytic converters have hugely reduced the amount of unburned HCs and CO as well as NOx.
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