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Thread: "POWER for all"

  1. #1 "POWER for all" 
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    HEY GUYS THIS IS MY ATTEMPT TO DO SOMETHING FOR MY EARTH.The major factor that is depleting the earth of its evergreen nature is our hunt for energy.
    its time to get innovative all i want u is to suggest me ways to save power(electricity) or generate cheap n clean source of energy to power a home.even a milliwatt of power saved or generated in a single home can make a huge dfference.
    ideas like power generated from urine using a hydrogen oxygen fuel cell can bring a revolution where each home can produce its own cheap electricity at home i.e one step to greener earth. [/b]


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  3. #2 Re: "POWER for all" 
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    can u plz solve these queries
    1.Considering a regular refrigerator with compressor evaporator cooling chamber nd expansion valve.how much heat and temperature does the commpressor produce at each cycle?can this heat be utilized by passing cold water through the pipe to extract the heat from compressor and the high pressure n temperature gas before it reachs cooling chamber for heat exchange and can it be used in water heater if yes then how much power can be saved?


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  4. #3  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Yes, it is theoretically possible to use a water-cooled heat exchanger instead of the air-cooled condenser that hangs off the back of your fridge.

    http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/Xplore/lo...hDecision=-203

    However there are potential practical problems. In most houses the fridge is not very close to the hot water tank, and the tank may be at a lower level, i.e. in the basement. This would mean you'd have to use a small pump and run water piping around the house to circulate the water. The pump's power consumption would reduce the potential savings. You would want a control system to shut off the pump when the compressore is not running. The water has to be cold enough to cool the refrigerant in a compact size heat exchanger, but hotter than the water in the hot water tank.

    Another point to consider is that in cold weather the fridge actually helps to heat the house, so reducing central heating costs.

    Still, it's an idea worth pursuing.
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  5. #4  
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    Neat idea.
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  6. #5  
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    Speaking of fridges, architects could better accomodate these major appliances. We cram them into dustbunny-gathering alcoves, so that airflow through the condenser coils is choked... the fridge must run and run... then the fridge manufacturer answers by including a wasteful fan to draw air under the fridge and hopefully over the top if that's not blocked with normal domestic clutter.

    Better do fridges as two parts: the main cabinet, and a detached condenser rack that may be mounted, say, in louvred exterior wall cavity. Then in winter you would hardly need a phase change to cool the fridge. In summer you would have shaded exposure to natural air convection. And the entire fridge package would take a bit less kitchen floorspace too.

    We don't do this because appliance manufacturers would have to work with home builders, come up with some standards. Also manufacturers would have to trust installers not to do something stupid.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  7. #6  
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    how abt ths idea.again considering a regular refridgerator. if the refigerant is divided and passed through many different conducting tubes,at different instances of time,such that a small amount of refrigerant is compressed in a compressor while the other tubes that gain heat from evaporator chamber r passed through this high temperature tubes(this can act as a coolant to certain extent as its temperature is much lower than compressed refrigerant )so that they can gain enough heat to minimize the compression required and the cycle continues....this can reduce the size and load to compressor while the exceess heat will also not be wasted...this could directly lead to low power consumption by compressor hence ...high gain...
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  8. #7  
    Time Lord
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    I didn't follow exactly, but that sounds wrong, sorry. If expanding that method to ideal embodiment results in fantastic energy recycling, then it's probably perpetual motion.

    The major problem with fridges is they're stand-alone, off-the-shelf products expected to perform wherever we park them. In the 30's when they entered homes we failed to integrate them with the house. Contrast built-in heating, water, and especially traditional food storage like root cellars, cold cupboards and larders.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  9. #8  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Large industrial compressors have multiple stages with intercooling. This greatly increases efficiency. Perhaps this is what you are getting at? It wouldn't really be practical on the tiny scale of a domestic refrigerator.
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  10. #9  
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    I don't think there's any doubt that it would work. It's a question of what sort of efficiency could we expect and what would be the return on the investment. I've read several articles that did similar projects such as putting the heat exchanger of a frig outside to reduce the compressors load during the winter months--they are reported to work very well. Another similar idea is shower heat recovery units which use a heat exchanger near the drain to heat the return cold water intake of the hot water tank.
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